SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

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    SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY


    The 9/11 Story Told at Bedrock, Powerful as a Punch to the Gut


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     



    Sept. 11 Memorial Museum at Ground Zero Prepares for Opening
    By HOLLAND COTTERMAY 14, 2014



    After a decade marked by deep grief, partisan rancor, war, financial boondoggles and inundation from Hurricane Sandy, the National September 11 Memorial Museum at ground zero is finally opening ceremonially on Thursday, with President Obama present, and officially to the public next Wednesday. It delivers a gut-punch experience — though if ever a new museum had looked, right along, like a disaster in the making, this one did, beginning with its trifurcated identity.


     


    Was it going to be primarily a historical document, a monument to the dead or a theme-park-style tourist attraction? How many historical museums are built around an active repository of human remains, still being added to? How many cemeteries have a $24 entrance fee and sell souvenir T-shirts? How many theme parks bring you, repeatedly, to tears?


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     



    FEATURED COMMENT


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    J New York, N.Y.
    Having lived here in NYC during that time I most assuredly will never visit this museum. I do not need it to remember nor do I want to remember it.

    Because that’s what the museum does. The first thing to say about it, and maybe the last, is that it’s emotionally overwhelming, particularly, I expect, for New Yorkers who were in the city on that apocalyptic September day and the paranoia-fraught weeks that followed, but almost as certainly for the estimated two billion people around the globe who followed the horror unfolding on television, radio and the Internet.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     



    Anguished, angry questions about the museum, raised by families of some of the 2,983 people who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and in the 1993 attack on the World Trade Center, have been widely reported. Debates over purpose, propriety and protocol are still in the air. At times, they have threatened to derail the project, or delay it indefinitely. But the work inched forward, and the museum that emerged is true to its initial and literally fundamental goal: to tell the Sept. 11 story at ground zero bedrock.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    While the accompanying National September 11 Memorial — two granite basins of cascading water that fill the twin tower footprints — is viewable from a street-level plaza, the museum is almost entirely subterranean. The bulk of it, some 110,000 square feet of gallery space, is 70 feet below ground, where the foundations of the towers met raw Manhattan schist.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    Invisibility can make for strong drama. A descent into darkness is the stuff of suspense. It’s also the classic route of religious ritual and regeneration, bringing images of the tomb and the seedbed to mind. The museum makes full use of these associations and reveals itself slowly.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    The drama starts, low key, on the plaza level with an aboveground entry pavilion midway between the memorial fountains. Designed by the Norwegian architectural firm Snohetta, it’s a glass box set at a sharp, dizzy tilt, like a tipping building or a listing ship. The blond-wood atrium, with its coat checks, a small cafe and a closed-off room for the use of Sept. 11 families, is atmospherically neutral, even bland, but offers an unmistakable sight: two of the immense steel trident columns that were the signature features of the twin tower facades.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    Once aluminum-covered, now rusted, this pair survived the collapse of the north tower. And although they dwarf the atrium, you’re only seeing a small section of them. Peer over a balcony, and you can follow their lines plunging several stories down, the direction you will now take to a second lobby area below plaza level, out of the range of natural light, and not so neutral in feeling.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    Among other things, the fraught global politics of Sept. 11 and the World Trade Center are hinted at here in an astonishing quotation, emblazoned on a wall, by Minoru Yamasaki, the architect of the towers, in which he declares the buildings “a monument to world peace.” Suffice it to say, not everyone bought this utopian gloss. To many people, these quarter-mile-high structures were at best two cold, giant vertical bars of silver bullion, at worst obscene gestures of capitalist might.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    And even as you read the architect’s words, you hear the Sept. 11 narrative being introduced nearby in a dark hallway leading farther into the museum. Projections of global maps and stricken faces line the path. Voices of people giving clipped, urgent accounts of catastrophe crowd the air.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    Recorded sound, once inadmissible in conventional museums, plays a major role in this one. So does scale. You emerge from the corridor’s close, oppressive aural cloud onto a platform overlooking a yawning space and an archaeological monolith: a 60-foot-high exposed section of the World Trade Center’s slurry wall. This thick, foundational barrier of poured concrete, laid before construction began in 1966, was, and is, the bulwark between the trade center and the Hudson River.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    When the twin towers collapsed, there was fear that the wall would give, flooding the site. It didn’t give. It cracked, but held, and was quickly claimed as an emblem of indomitability and resilience. Daniel Libeskind, when he was hired as master planner for a new trade center complex in 2003, spoke of the slurry wall as the soul of his design, and by then it had already served as a multipurpose symbol of urban recovery, democracy, communal strength, the human spirit, not to mention the virtues of sound engineering.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    Metaphorical thinking was rife in the days and months after Sept. 11. Everything was framed in terms of darkness and light, wounding and healing, death and rebirth. The interior design of the museum, by the New York firm Davis Brody Bond, preserves this kind of thinking in several of its features, notably in a long, descending ramp that leads visitors down seven stories, between the gigantic sunken cubes of the memorial pool basins, to true ground zero.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    The ramp was inspired by an access road that was created during the early recovery phase and eventually took on a sacral aura. But in the museum context, the ramp becomes a processional path, lined with anticipatory vistas and projected versions of the “Missing” posters that papered the post-Sept. 11 city for weeks.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    And when the path finally ends at bedrock, it leaves a choice of ways to go, toward a subdued exhibition commemorating those killed by the terrorist attacks or toward a disturbingly vivid evocation of the events themselves. It’s at this point that the conflicted character of the museum starts to become clear.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    The commemorative display is, basically, the equivalent of a communal, life-honoring memorial service perpetually in progress. Photographs of nearly 3,000 people cover the walls of a gallery. The same faces, along with biographical portraits and spoken reminiscences, can be pulled up on touch screens and projected large in another room. Some 14,000 still unidentified or unclaimed Sept. 11 remains reside, unseen, in an adjacent repository, at the request of a vast majority of families.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    VIDEO FEATURE
    9/11 Artifacts, and the Stories They Tell
    At the National September 11 Memorial Museum, artifacts help tell the story of the nearly 3,000 people who died that day. A collection of videos looks at a few of those objects.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    OPEN VIDEO FEATURE
    A smaller group has protested the presence of the remains here. Families of some victims have balked at the idea of a museum — especially one that will inevitably swarm with casual tourists — doubling as a mortuary. Others fear that a building that took on 11 feet of water during Hurricane Sandy could flood again. Finally, the fact that the remains are not technically entombed but in storage, and subject to removal for testing, under the auspices of the city’s chief medical examiner, inevitably compromises any sense of repose.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    Repose is the last word you’d associate with the museum’s other, larger exhibition, addressing that September day itself. Winding through several galleries, it calls on videos, audio recordings, photographs and hundreds of objects to document, minute by minute, the events of that Tuesday, from 8:46 a.m., when American Airlines Flight 11 slammed into the north tower, and on past 10:28 a.m., when that tower fell, by which time three other planes were pulverized, the Pentagon was in flames, and thousands of people were gone.


    The installation is the work of a team of designers led by the museum’s director, Alice M. Greenwald, formerly an official at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington. It is culled from over 10,000 artifacts in the museum’s collection, and some of them are devastating: recordings of last phone calls; photographs of doomed firefighters heading into action; surveillance videos of hijackers passing — no problem — undetected through airport security. Certain material, like video stills of people leaping from the towers, are set in alcoves with advisory notices, but even things not usually considered shocking can leave you dumbstruck. For some reason, the largest objects — an intact fire truck with carefully folded hoses but a burned-out cab; a steel column plastered with prayer cards; a storefront jeans display still covered with World Trade Center ashes — are the easiest to take, maybe because of their public identity, or even their resemblance to contemporary sculpture. The hundreds of small, battered personal items, many donated by families of the victims, are another story. Their natural realm is the purse, the pocket, the bedside drawer at home; they feel too ordinary and intimate to have ended up under plexiglass. Infused with lost life, they make the experience of moving through this museum at once theatrical, voyeuristic and devotional.


     


     


    Its nearest equivalent I can think of is the dynamic of religious pilgrimage sites, whether Christian churches, Buddhist temples or Sufi shrines. There, the mortal remains of saints, and objects sanctified by their touch, are the focus of attention. Here, you also walk a long, sanctified route, stopping at the equivalent of side chapels and altars, contemplating icons, talismans and embodied miracles: a pair of crossed steel ground zero girders that to some eyes formed a crucifix, a Bible found fused to a hunk of steel and opened to a passage that warns against repaying violence with violence.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     



    The prevailing story in the museum, as in a church, is framed in moral terms, as a story of angels and devils. In this telling, the angels are many and heroic, the devils few and vile, a band of Islamist radicals, as they are identified in a cut-and-dried, contextless and unnuanced film called “The Rise of Al Qaeda,” seen at the end of the exhibition.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    The narrative is not so much wrong as drastically incomplete. It is useful history, not deep history; news, not analysis. This approach is probably inevitable in a museum that is, to an unusual degree, still living the history it is documenting; still working through the bereavement it is memorializing; still attached to the idea that, for better and worse, Sept. 11 “changed everything,” though there is plenty of evidence that, for better and worse, this is not so. The amped-up patriotism set off by the attacks has largely subsided. So has the tender, in-this-together generosity that Americans extended to one another at the time.


    Still, within its narrow perspective, maybe because of it, the museum has done something powerful. And, fortunately, it seems to regard itself as a work in progress, involved in investigation, not summation. I hope so. If it stops growing and freezes its narrative, it will become, however affecting, just another Sept. 11 artifact. If it tackles the reality that its story is as much about global politics as about architecture, about a bellicose epoch as much as about a violent event, it could deepen all our thinking about politics, morality and devotion.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow">


     


                                                                

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName9. Show UserName9's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    Selling souvenir t-shirts seems tacky to me.

     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    One of my favorite comments that I feel is very poignant is the following, esp. the last paragraph:

    The world needs this museum. While many people were witnessing that morning's tragedy unfold from the surrounding streets of Manhattan, I and my colleagues were fearing for our lives as we descended 42 flights of stairs in a skyscraper a few blocks from the WTC, having just witnessed both planes crash into the towers. We feared that another plane could be headed for our own building, so going down the stairs felt like a race for our lives. I escaped Lower Manhattan on the 5 at Bowling Green. I was underground and oblivious. I "witnessed" the rest of 9/11 as I entered my boyfriend's apartment about an hour later. The news was on, and at that very moment I entered, the second tower fell. Though I was close to the epicenter of the day's events, I also experienced 9/11 the way most people around the world did, on TV. I think visiting this museum will help me personally meld those two spectrums of experience.

    My children are now 5 and 2. Clearly they are too young to visit the museum. But someday I will take them, so they can learn about an event that was a pivotal turning point in my life, and to pay their respects to the thousands of others who lost theirs. There are lessons to be learned from this museum: the destructive nature of hate, the resilience of the human spirit and the importance of preserving history so these lessons can continue to be passed on to future generations.

     

     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    Does the OP really have to have all that dead space??? Christ....pull your head out of your...

     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    Does the OP really have to have all that dead space??? Christ....pull your head out of your...



    Classy. Do you have anything valuable to say regarding the topic?

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    Does the OP really have to have all that dead space??? Christ....pull your head out of your...



    Classy. Do you have anything valuable to say regarding the topic?



    You mean like Username did??? Hypocrisy at its best

     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    For 46&2: No open spaces. Maybe now you can concentrate on the story and offer something.


     



    The 9/11 Story Told at Bedrock, Powerful as a Punch to the Gut
    Sept. 11 Memorial Museum at Ground Zero Prepares for Opening
    By HOLLAND COTTERMAY 14, 2014
    Photo


    Airplane fragments displayed at the Sept. 11 museum. Credit Damon Winter/The New York Times
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    After a decade marked by deep grief, partisan rancor, war, financial boondoggles and inundation from Hurricane Sandy, the National September 11 Memorial Museum at ground zero is finally opening ceremonially on Thursday, with President Obama present, and officially to the public next Wednesday. It delivers a gut-punch experience — though if ever a new museum had looked, right along, like a disaster in the making, this one did, beginning with its trifurcated identity.


    Was it going to be primarily a historical document, a monument to the dead or a theme-park-style tourist attraction? How many historical museums are built around an active repository of human remains, still being added to? How many cemeteries have a $24 entrance fee and sell souvenir T-shirts? How many theme parks bring you, repeatedly, to tears?


    Continue reading the main story
    FEATURED COMMENT


    J New York, N.Y.
    Having lived here in NYC during that time I most assuredly will never visit this museum. I do not need it to remember nor do I want to remember it.
    408 COMMENTS WRITE A COMMENT
    Because that’s what the museum does. The first thing to say about it, and maybe the last, is that it’s emotionally overwhelming, particularly, I expect, for New Yorkers who were in the city on that apocalyptic September day and the paranoia-fraught weeks that followed, but almost as certainly for the estimated two billion people around the globe who followed the horror unfolding on television, radio and the Internet.


    Continue reading the main story
    INTERACTIVE FEATURE
    A New Story Told at Ground Zero
    A guided tour of the National September 11 Memorial Museum.



    OPEN INTERACTIVE FEATURE
    Anguished, angry questions about the museum, raised by families of some of the 2,983 people who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and in the 1993 attack on the World Trade Center, have been widely reported. Debates over purpose, propriety and protocol are still in the air. At times, they have threatened to derail the project, or delay it indefinitely. But the work inched forward, and the museum that emerged is true to its initial and literally fundamental goal: to tell the Sept. 11 story at ground zero bedrock.


    While the accompanying National September 11 Memorial — two granite basins of cascading water that fill the twin tower footprints — is viewable from a street-level plaza, the museum is almost entirely subterranean. The bulk of it, some 110,000 square feet of gallery space, is 70 feet below ground, where the foundations of the towers met raw Manhattan schist.


    Invisibility can make for strong drama. A descent into darkness is the stuff of suspense. It’s also the classic route of religious ritual and regeneration, bringing images of the tomb and the seedbed to mind. The museum makes full use of these associations and reveals itself slowly.


    The drama starts, low key, on the plaza level with an aboveground entry pavilion midway between the memorial fountains. Designed by the Norwegian architectural firm Snohetta, it’s a glass box set at a sharp, dizzy tilt, like a tipping building or a listing ship. The blond-wood atrium, with its coat checks, a small cafe and a closed-off room for the use of Sept. 11 families, is atmospherically neutral, even bland, but offers an unmistakable sight: two of the immense steel trident columns that were the signature features of the twin tower facades.


    Once aluminum-covered, now rusted, this pair survived the collapse of the north tower. And although they dwarf the atrium, you’re only seeing a small section of them. Peer over a balcony, and you can follow their lines plunging several stories down, the direction you will now take to a second lobby area below plaza level, out of the range of natural light, and not so neutral in feeling.


    Continue reading the main story
    PHOTOGRAPHS
    Where the Twin Towers Stood
    Architecture and artifacts from the Sept. 11 memorial and museum. Photographs by Andrew Moore



    OPEN PHOTOGRAPHS
    Continue reading the main story
    Among other things, the fraught global politics of Sept. 11 and the World Trade Center are hinted at here in an astonishing quotation, emblazoned on a wall, by Minoru Yamasaki, the architect of the towers, in which he declares the buildings “a monument to world peace.” Suffice it to say, not everyone bought this utopian gloss. To many people, these quarter-mile-high structures were at best two cold, giant vertical bars of silver bullion, at worst obscene gestures of capitalist might.


    And even as you read the architect’s words, you hear the Sept. 11 narrative being introduced nearby in a dark hallway leading farther into the museum. Projections of global maps and stricken faces line the path. Voices of people giving clipped, urgent accounts of catastrophe crowd the air.


    Recorded sound, once inadmissible in conventional museums, plays a major role in this one. So does scale. You emerge from the corridor’s close, oppressive aural cloud onto a platform overlooking a yawning space and an archaeological monolith: a 60-foot-high exposed section of the World Trade Center’s slurry wall. This thick, foundational barrier of poured concrete, laid before construction began in 1966, was, and is, the bulwark between the trade center and the Hudson River.


    When the twin towers collapsed, there was fear that the wall would give, flooding the site. It didn’t give. It cracked, but held, and was quickly claimed as an emblem of indomitability and resilience. Daniel Libeskind, when he was hired as master planner for a new trade center complex in 2003, spoke of the slurry wall as the soul of his design, and by then it had already served as a multipurpose symbol of urban recovery, democracy, communal strength, the human spirit, not to mention the virtues of sound engineering.


    Metaphorical thinking was rife in the days and months after Sept. 11. Everything was framed in terms of darkness and light, wounding and healing, death and rebirth. The interior design of the museum, by the New York firm Davis Brody Bond, preserves this kind of thinking in several of its features, notably in a long, descending ramp that leads visitors down seven stories, between the gigantic sunken cubes of the memorial pool basins, to true ground zero.


    The ramp was inspired by an access road that was created during the early recovery phase and eventually took on a sacral aura. But in the museum context, the ramp becomes a processional path, lined with anticipatory vistas and projected versions of the “Missing” posters that papered the post-Sept. 11 city for weeks.


    And when the path finally ends at bedrock, it leaves a choice of ways to go, toward a subdued exhibition commemorating those killed by the terrorist attacks or toward a disturbingly vivid evocation of the events themselves. It’s at this point that the conflicted character of the museum starts to become clear.


    Continue reading the main story
    RECENT COMMENTS


    Anthony 6 hours ago
    Let me first state that 9/11 (or 11/9) was horrifying -- I have nothing but absolute sympathy for the families of victims. That said, we...
    Mike 6 hours ago
    The 19 people who did 9/11, they had reasons for doing this. I hope that the museum at least attempts to delve into what motivated the...
    Martha Rickey 6 hours ago
    I was in the Twin Cities on 9/11, where news coverage included a kind of keeping-up-with-the-Jones's speculation about whether the Mall of...
    SEE ALL COMMENTS WRITE A COMMENT
    The commemorative display is, basically, the equivalent of a communal, life-honoring memorial service perpetually in progress. Photographs of nearly 3,000 people cover the walls of a gallery. The same faces, along with biographical portraits and spoken reminiscences, can be pulled up on touch screens and projected large in another room. Some 14,000 still unidentified or unclaimed Sept. 11 remains reside, unseen, in an adjacent repository, at the request of a vast majority of families.


    Continue reading the main story
    VIDEO FEATURE
    9/11 Artifacts, and the Stories They Tell
    At the National September 11 Memorial Museum, artifacts help tell the story of the nearly 3,000 people who died that day. A collection of videos looks at a few of those objects.



    OPEN VIDEO FEATURE
    A smaller group has protested the presence of the remains here. Families of some victims have balked at the idea of a museum — especially one that will inevitably swarm with casual tourists — doubling as a mortuary. Others fear that a building that took on 11 feet of water during Hurricane Sandy could flood again. Finally, the fact that the remains are not technically entombed but in storage, and subject to removal for testing, under the auspices of the city’s chief medical examiner, inevitably compromises any sense of repose.


    Continue reading the main story
    EXPAND


    Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
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    Repose is the last word you’d associate with the museum’s other, larger exhibition, addressing that September day itself. Winding through several galleries, it calls on videos, audio recordings, photographs and hundreds of objects to document, minute by minute, the events of that Tuesday, from 8:46 a.m., when American Airlines Flight 11 slammed into the north tower, and on past 10:28 a.m., when that tower fell, by which time three other planes were pulverized, the Pentagon was in flames, and thousands of people were gone.


    The installation is the work of a team of designers led by the museum’s director, Alice M. Greenwald, formerly an official at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington. It is culled from over 10,000 artifacts in the museum’s collection, and some of them are devastating: recordings of last phone calls; photographs of doomed firefighters heading into action; surveillance videos of hijackers passing — no problem — undetected through airport security. Certain material, like video stills of people leaping from the towers, are set in alcoves with advisory notices, but even things not usually considered shocking can leave you dumbstruck. For some reason, the largest objects — an intact fire truck with carefully folded hoses but a burned-out cab; a steel column plastered with prayer cards; a storefront jeans display still covered with World Trade Center ashes — are the easiest to take, maybe because of their public identity, or even their resemblance to contemporary sculpture. The hundreds of small, battered personal items, many donated by families of the victims, are another story. Their natural realm is the purse, the pocket, the bedside drawer at home; they feel too ordinary and intimate to have ended up under plexiglass. Infused with lost life, they make the experience of moving through this museum at once theatrical, voyeuristic and devotional.


    Its nearest equivalent I can think of is the dynamic of religious pilgrimage sites, whether Christian churches, Buddhist temples or Sufi shrines. There, the mortal remains of saints, and objects sanctified by their touch, are the focus of attention. Here, you also walk a long, sanctified route, stopping at the equivalent of side chapels and altars, contemplating icons, talismans and embodied miracles: a pair of crossed steel ground zero girders that to some eyes formed a crucifix, a Bible found fused to a hunk of steel and opened to a passage that warns against repaying violence with violence.


    CONTINUE READING THE MAIN STORY
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    The prevailing story in the museum, as in a church, is framed in moral terms, as a story of angels and devils. In this telling, the angels are many and heroic, the devils few and vile, a band of Islamist radicals, as they are identified in a cut-and-dried, contextless and unnuanced film called “The Rise of Al Qaeda,” seen at the end of the exhibition.


    The narrative is not so much wrong as drastically incomplete. It is useful history, not deep history; news, not analysis. This approach is probably inevitable in a museum that is, to an unusual degree, still living the history it is documenting; still working through the bereavement it is memorializing; still attached to the idea that, for better and worse, Sept. 11 “changed everything,” though there is plenty of evidence that, for better and worse, this is not so. The amped-up patriotism set off by the attacks has largely subsided. So has the tender, in-this-together generosity that Americans extended to one another at the time.


    Still, within its narrow perspective, maybe because of it, the museum has done something powerful. And, fortunately, it seems to regard itself as a work in progress, involved in investigation, not summation. I hope so. If it stops growing and freezes its narrative, it will become, however affecting, just another Sept. 11 artifact. If it tackles the reality that its story is as much about global politics as about architecture, about a bellicose epoch as much as about a violent event, it could deepen all our thinking about politics, morality and devotion.


     


     




    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/arts/design/sept-11-memorial-museum-at-ground-zero-prepares-for-opening.html

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    "Christ....pull your head out of your..."

    The epitome of class.

                                                                

     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    They have got to do something about the "white sea."

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to 2013soxchamps' comment:

    They have got to do something about the "white sea."



    Absolutely. This time was even stranger. In the OP, despite my use of the backspace key, it "took" but only in some spaces. It was very frustrating. So the 2nd time I did not edit the post at all. 

    Funny thing is it seemed to be getting better the last couple of days.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    I went to the memorial in OKC of the bombing of the federal building.  I couldn't stay.  The saddest place I've ever been to.  The negative vibe was overpowering.  They should have covered the whole area with dirt and turned it into a park.  And then create a memorial away for the site celebrating the lives of the people who died that day.  It was gut wrenching to be there.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName9. Show UserName9's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

    I went to the memorial in OKC of the bombing of the federal building.  I couldn't stay.  The saddest place I've ever been to.  The negative vibe was overpowering.  They should have covered the whole area with dirt and turned it into a park.  And then create a memorial away for the site celebrating the lives of the people who died that day.  It was gut wrenching to be there.



    Do you remember if they sold commemerative t shirts, bobble head dolls, or snow globes at the OKC site?

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    Next time I'm in NY I plan on attending.

    It was a very traumatic day, I had family members traveling out of Logan that morning and I remember being on my way to a meeting in Boston when I received a call from a colleague telling me to tune into the radio just before plane two hit the second tower.  At noon the city was empty as an F14 flew low in the empty sky.  My second most striking memory is a few years later when I traveled from Newark to the temporary WTC station, the train came through the Hudson River Tunnel and emerged into the edge WTC pit illuminated with construction lights in the early evening, very surreal. 

    ...the man who really counts in the world is the doer,...  TR 1891

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to UserName9's comment:

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

    I went to the memorial in OKC of the bombing of the federal building.  I couldn't stay.  The saddest place I've ever been to.  The negative vibe was overpowering.  They should have covered the whole area with dirt and turned it into a park.  And then create a memorial away for the site celebrating the lives of the people who died that day.  It was gut wrenching to be there.



    Do you remember if they sold commemerative t shirts, bobble head dolls, or snow globes at the OKC site?



    No - no gift shop.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

    Next time I'm in NY I plan on attending.

    It was a very traumatic day, I had family members traveling out of Logan that morning and I remember being on my way to a meeting in Boston when I received a call from a colleague telling me to tune into the radio just before plane two hit the second tower.  At noon the city was empty as an F14 flew low in the empty sky.  My second most striking memory is a few years later when I traveled from Newark to the temporary WTC station, the train came through the Hudson River Tunnel and emerged into the edge WTC pit illuminated with construction lights in the early evening, very surreal. 

    ...the man who really counts in the world is the doer,...  TR 1891



    When the constrution is done, it won't be so sureal and the reality of what happened will set in.  I've seen disasters that overwhelmed the senses - I saw the results of a huge tornado and was anticipating feeling sad but the level of destruction was awe inspiring (of course, that was done by nature). 

    I think memorializing sites of great evil seems morbid.  It's like we are honoring the deed.  I can see "not wanting to forget", but that means remembering the ugliness and evil.  The WWII concentration camps that have been memorialized in Europe strike me as being there as punishment to force people to see what they did.

    We have a Lincoln memorial in DC that celebrates his life.  We didn't put it on the site where he was assasinated.  They didn't turn the road and book depository in Dallas into a memorial for JFK.

    It's as if purple heart recipients have to wear their ribbon over their scar.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

    Next time I'm in NY I plan on attending.

    It was a very traumatic day, I had family members traveling out of Logan that morning and I remember being on my way to a meeting in Boston when I received a call from a colleague telling me to tune into the radio just before plane two hit the second tower.  At noon the city was empty as an F14 flew low in the empty sky.  My second most striking memory is a few years later when I traveled from Newark to the temporary WTC station, the train came through the Hudson River Tunnel and emerged into the edge WTC pit illuminated with construction lights in the early evening, very surreal. 

    ...the man who really counts in the world is the doer,...  TR 1891



    When the constrution is done, it won't be so sureal and the reality of what happened will set in.  I've seen disasters that overwhelmed the senses - I saw the results of a huge tornado and was anticipating feeling sad but the level of destruction was awe inspiring (of course, that was done by nature). 

    I think memorializing sites of great evil seems morbid.  It's like we are honoring the deed.  I can see "not wanting to forget", but that means remembering the ugliness and evil.  The WWII concentration camps that have been memorialized in Europe strike me as being there as punishment to force people to see what they did.

    We have a Lincoln memorial in DC that celebrates his life.  We didn't put it on the site where he was assasinated.  They didn't turn the road and book depository in Dallas into a memorial for JFK.

    It's as if purple heart recipients have to wear their ribbon over their scar.




    [object HTMLDivElement]

    I understand your point, as I've always been perplexed by the instant roadside shrines set up for traffic accidents.  But the 911 event is this era's Pearl Harbor and although I never visited Pearl Harbor and the Arizona Memorial over the sunken hunk along battle ship row, I've been told it is very moving.  I see the 911 WTC Memorial in that same light.  Those closest to the attack may have a very hard time with it while others may find some strong sense of peace.

     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

    Next time I'm in NY I plan on attending.

    It was a very traumatic day, I had family members traveling out of Logan that morning and I remember being on my way to a meeting in Boston when I received a call from a colleague telling me to tune into the radio just before plane two hit the second tower.  At noon the city was empty as an F14 flew low in the empty sky.  My second most striking memory is a few years later when I traveled from Newark to the temporary WTC station, the train came through the Hudson River Tunnel and emerged into the edge WTC pit illuminated with construction lights in the early evening, very surreal. 

    ...the man who really counts in the world is the doer,...  TR 1891



    When the constrution is done, it won't be so sureal and the reality of what happened will set in.  I've seen disasters that overwhelmed the senses - I saw the results of a huge tornado and was anticipating feeling sad but the level of destruction was awe inspiring (of course, that was done by nature). 

    I think memorializing sites of great evil seems morbid.  It's like we are honoring the deed.  I can see "not wanting to forget", but that means remembering the ugliness and evil.  The WWII concentration camps that have been memorialized in Europe strike me as being there as punishment to force people to see what they did.

    We have a Lincoln memorial in DC that celebrates his life.  We didn't put it on the site where he was assasinated.  They didn't turn the road and book depository in Dallas into a memorial for JFK.

    It's as if purple heart recipients have to wear their ribbon over their scar.




    [object HTMLDivElement]

    I understand your point, as I've always been perplexed by the instant roadside shrines set up for traffic accidents.  But the 911 event is this era's Pearl Harbor and although I never visited Pearl Harbor and the Arizona Memorial over the sunken hunk along battle ship row, I've been told it is very moving.  I see the 911 WTC Memorial in that same light.  Those closest to the attack may have a very hard time with it while others may find some strong sense of peace.



    It will be moving.  If it's anything like OKC, you will feel the evil of the deed and the sorrow that followed.  Maybe its different at WTC because no little kids were killed.  But I can't imagine ever going there.  Just thinking about the people who were trapped and the fear and terror as the flames came towards them.  I remember watching the first tower collapse and thinking about all of the firemen in the building.  I looked around at others watching the scene unfold and I couldn't tell if they were numb or if they just weren't comprehending what happened. 

    There was this episode of the Original Star Trek when Spock got this cosmic shock of emotion when a Vulcan ship was destroyed.  I keep thinking the same type of thing happened on 9/11 and the cosmic emotion is still at the site.  Or the ghosts of the people who haven't been identified still wander the area.

    I can't even watch video of the event.  It took me years before I could stand to see Tim McVeigh image on TV. 

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    "It will be moving. If it's anything like OKC, you will feel the evil of the deed and the sorrow that followed. Maybe its different at WTC because no little kids were killed. But I can't imagine ever going there. Just thinking about the people who were trapped and the fear and terror as the flames came towards them. I remember watching the first tower collapse and thinking about all of the firemen in the building. I looked around at others watching the scene unfold and I couldn't tell if they were numb or if they just weren't comprehending what happened.

    There was this episode of the Original Star Trek when Spock got this cosmic shock of emotion when a Vulcan ship was destroyed. I keep thinking the same type of thing happened on 9/11 and the cosmic emotion is still at the site. Or the ghosts of the people who haven't been identified still wander the area.

    I can't even watch video of the event. It took me years before I could stand to see Tim McVeigh image on TV."

     

    I very much understand your feelings and emotions. 

    Mine were different that day. I could not move away from the TV. I just could not. I could not believe it was happening. And I think like many, if these people were being forced to go thru this, who was I to turn away as hard as it was to watch.

    Also, the first thing I did was call close family. I read later millions of people did the same. The switchboards became jammed. If you remember, at the time we did not know how large an attack this would ultimately be. People just wanted to be with their loved ones. And many people did go home.

    I did not know anyone who died in the towers but my husband did. He looked at the photos in the article that did not transfer over to this site. He went a bit pale. 

    For those that do go, I believe for many, it is going to be a difficult museum to walk thru. I also believe there will be more than a few tears shed, by men as well as by women.

    I plan to go the next time we go to NYC. Do not know about the gift shop, UserName9. :)



     
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    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY


    9/11 Victim Families, Survivors Outraged by Memorial’s Gift Shop


     Thursday,May 15, 2014, in New York.
    Patrons visit the pools at The 9/11 Memorial near the World Trade Center in New York.Credit: AP
    By Roberto Scalese
    Boston.com Staff
    MAY 18, 2014 
    The 9/11 Memorial has opened in New York, giving the city and the world a place to reflect on the thousands of lives lost during the 2001 terrorist attack. And to buy tchotchkes.

    Survivors and family members have expressed outrage over the gift shop located on the memorial grounds, calling it “crass” and “insensitive,” according to the New York Post.

    Diane Horning, who lost her son when the World Trade Center towers collapsed, told the Post the 8,000 unidentified body parts kept at the site made it a tomb, and selling FDNY mugs and shirts trivialized the location.

    RELATED The Big Picture: The National September 11 Memorial Museum Share This Story

    "Here is essentially our tomb of the unknown. To sell baubles I find quite shocking and repugnant," said Horning, who also objects to the museum cafe.
    "I think it's a money-making venture to support inflated salaries, and they're willing to do it over my son's dead body."
    The proceeds from the shop go toward running the memorial, according to the Post. But John Feal, who runs a non-profit for 9/11 responders, told the Post that the shop should have stayed closed while family members toured the memorial.

    "These people are suffering, and they don't need to be reaching into their pockets," Feal said. "The museum could have gone six days without asking for money."



    http://www.boston.com/news/nation/2014/05/18/victim-families-survivors-outraged-memorial-gift-shop/tJxkqFex64d4fjQOEMUyCK/story.html

     
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  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    It's real simple. Don't buy any souvenirs and the store will go away and message will have been sent and received. Time will tell if we the people really are disgusted by this or not....

     
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  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from high-road. Show high-road's posts

    Re: SEPT 11 MEMORIAL MUSEUM AT GROUND ZERO PREPARES FOR OPENING ON THURSDAY

    In response to mossad-did-911's comment:

    just like norman finkelstein explained in his book "the holocaust industry", the event of 9/11 (not Chile, but America) is being milked and exploited for profit. the WTC buildings were owned by an Israeli (Larry Silverstein), they were knocked down by Israel (Mossad), and guess who was hired to to design the museum?...that's right, an israeli (Michael Harad). 

    it's an israeli celebration!!! well done israel!! you fooled us!!




    Wow, that was 'interesting'.

    Went right of the deep end with that one.

    See ya in the funny papers spanky.

     

     
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