Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to chiefhowie's comment:

    In response to ppannos' comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to andiejen's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to ppannos' comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     


    1. Does anyone really believe it will improve the dismal performance of Boston students

    2. What will it cost?

     

     

     



    Do you really think it is not worth trying?

     

     

     

    If it were your children in the Boston public school system, what would you want?

    What will it cost if nothing is done? Think back to your school days. Do they resemble the Boston public school system experience?

    I know mine do not. And I thank my lucky stars they do not. I have no idea who I would be if I had had to survive K-12 in that. Maybe I would have be fortuate enough to attend a charter school or Boston Rindge and Latin but, not spaces for everyone in those schools.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I reasonably asked 2 questions.

     

     

    We can't continue to chase political  Pegasus ideas without facts, budgets and goals.

    What metrics will be applied BEFORE we whack the taxpayers again aka Stimulus, renewable energy, etc

     

    I attended BPS in days when they produced good students.. not argueably the case today.

    Following that thought.. WHY the poor quality of education?

    I think we share the common goal of improving education but owe it to ourselves and the children to KNOW where the system failed them... or is this possibly a move from the corrupt teachers unions to grab cash.   

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Lot of good schools around in the Old Days. When Teachers were thought of with respect ,like Doctors.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    chiefhowie,

    Agreed there were a lot more good schools as well as good teachers if we go back.

    Statistics show that it is often the students towards the bottom of their class that go into teaching. 

    Well, that is just great. The poorer students become the bulk of the teachers. Reasons given are relatively low pay as well as the low prestige you mentioned.

    There are programs designed to help give professionals a chance to pivot into teaching. There you have the chance for the more successful students who have had real world experience who now want to teach to enter our classrooms for reasons of their own.

    Forgiveness of debt for teachers who hang in there for a number of years helps attract smarter students to this profession.

    My father taught high school for 40 years. It was no picnic...not even in a nice R.I suburb. But it certainly exposed me to a lot of what teachers, students and their families go through to get a decent education.

    But that is nothing compared to getting one in the Boston public school systems.

    I spent 1st grade in a Providence school that taught K-12 before we moved to the suburbs. It was completely night and day. I still feel I survived 1st grade as opposed to attended 1st grade and that was many many years ago.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to ppannos' comment:

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to ppannos' comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     


    1. Does anyone really believe it will improve the dismal performance of Boston students

    2. What will it cost?

     

     



    Do you really think it is not worth trying?

     

     

    If it were your children in the Boston public school system, what would you want?

    What will it cost if nothing is done? Think back to your school days. Do they resemble the Boston public school system experience?

    I know mine do not. And I thank my lucky stars they do not. I have no idea who I would be if I had had to survive K-12 in that. Maybe I would have be fortuate enough to attend a charter school or Boston Rindge and Latin but, not spaces for everyone in those schools.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I reasonably asked 2 questions.

     

    We can't continue to chase political  Pegasus ideas without facts, budgets and goals.

    What metrics will be applied BEFORE we whack the taxpayers again aka Stimulus, renewable energy, etc

     

    I attended BPS in days when they produced good students.. not argueably the case today.

    Following that thought.. WHY the poor quality of education?

    I think we share the common goal of improving education but owe it to ourselves and the children to KNOW where the system failed them... or is this possibly a move from the corrupt teachers unions to grab cash.   

    [/QUOTE]


    You seem to be assuming the unions would be in favor of longer school days.

    I think that is a rather large assumption.

    Many teachers prefer the current hours. It works much better in having a job and a family. 

    Also, there could be a push to get longer hours without more compensaton. Or very little extra compensation. 

    One thing is for sure. The more we play around with this, the more students get passed through with terrible educations.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ppannos. Show ppannos's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    In response to ppannos' comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

    In response to ppannos' comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     


    1. Does anyone really believe it will improve the dismal performance of Boston students

    2. What will it cost?

     

     

     



    Do you really think it is not worth trying?

     

     

     

    If it were your children in the Boston public school system, what would you want?

    What will it cost if nothing is done? Think back to your school days. Do they resemble the Boston public school system experience?

    I know mine do not. And I thank my lucky stars they do not. I have no idea who I would be if I had had to survive K-12 in that. Maybe I would have be fortuate enough to attend a charter school or Boston Rindge and Latin but, not spaces for everyone in those schools.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I reasonably asked 2 questions.

     

     

    We can't continue to chase political  Pegasus ideas without facts, budgets and goals.

    What metrics will be applied BEFORE we whack the taxpayers again aka Stimulus, renewable energy, etc

     

    I attended BPS in days when they produced good students.. not argueably the case today.

    Following that thought.. WHY the poor quality of education?

    I think we share the common goal of improving education but owe it to ourselves and the children to KNOW where the system failed them... or is this possibly a move from the corrupt teachers unions to grab cash.   

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

    You seem to be assuming the unions would be in favor of longer school days.

    I think that is a rather large assumption.

    Many teachers prefer the current hours. It works much better in having a job and a family. 

    Also, there could be a push to get longer hours without more compensaton. Or very little extra compensation. 

    One thing is for sure. The more we play around with this, the more students get passed through with terrible educations.

    [/QUOTE]


    Now we need the unions permission..

    Will a longer day with poor teacgers improve anything ?

    I'm not against the idea but my questions stand unanswered

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to ppannos' comment:

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to ppannos' comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to andiejen's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

     

    In response to ppannos' comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

     


    1. Does anyone really believe it will improve the dismal performance of Boston students

    2. What will it cost?

     

     

     

     



    Do you really think it is not worth trying?

     

     

     

     

    If it were your children in the Boston public school system, what would you want?

    What will it cost if nothing is done? Think back to your school days. Do they resemble the Boston public school system experience?

    I know mine do not. And I thank my lucky stars they do not. I have no idea who I would be if I had had to survive K-12 in that. Maybe I would have be fortuate enough to attend a charter school or Boston Rindge and Latin but, not spaces for everyone in those schools.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I reasonably asked 2 questions.

     

     

     

    We can't continue to chase political  Pegasus ideas without facts, budgets and goals.

    What metrics will be applied BEFORE we whack the taxpayers again aka Stimulus, renewable energy, etc

     

    I attended BPS in days when they produced good students.. not argueably the case today.

    Following that thought.. WHY the poor quality of education?

    I think we share the common goal of improving education but owe it to ourselves and the children to KNOW where the system failed them... or is this possibly a move from the corrupt teachers unions to grab cash.   

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    You seem to be assuming the unions would be in favor of longer school days.

    I think that is a rather large assumption.

    Many teachers prefer the current hours. It works much better in having a job and a family. 

    Also, there could be a push to get longer hours without more compensaton. Or very little extra compensation. 

    One thing is for sure. The more we play around with this, the more students get passed through with terrible educations.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    Now we need the unions permission..

     

    Will a longer day with poor teacgers improve anything ?

    I'm not against the idea but my questions stand unanswered

    [/QUOTE]

    As for the unions...there are such a thing as contracts.

    As for poor teachers, that is a thread onto itself. How to improve the quality of teachers in our public school systems.

    Your 2 questions.

    1. Yes, some people do believe longer hours will improve performance.

    2. A cost study would have to be done. The parameters could vary. Say, start with a few schools...not the whole system. Evaluate the results down the line.

    Okie dokie on your two questions.

     

     
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  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from GregoryFromMeffa. Show GregoryFromMeffa's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    Now we need the unions permission..

    ---------------------------

    Unless its a charter, you betcha.

    Seems I got banned.  Imagine!

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to GregoryFromMeffa's comment:

    Now we need the unions permission..

    ---------------------------

    Unless its a charter, you betcha.

    Seems I got banned.  Imagine!




    Gregin,

    Wonder where you have been. I cannot believe you got banned.

    Maybe you should contact BDC and find out why?

    I am still going to call you Gregin, if you do not mind.

     
  8. This post has been removed.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to chiefhowie's comment:

    If you got the money go else where !!!

    None of My 6 G_kids go to public schools.

    it's all about money now. Just like DC.

     




    chiefhowie,

    Of course.

    Those of us who can, send our children to parochial or private schools for the most part.

    But that just is not an option for everybody. Further, those who attend those public schools are the future employees of our country. They are not our children, but they do affect our future and our children's future if you just look at it in a pragmatic way.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to jedwardnicky's comment:

    Interesting. As a former senior custodian in a school system I can say it's problematic. We had two months in the summer to clean our buildings from top to bottom. Nobody really considers that fact. They think it's easy to do. It's not.



    What does the idea of longer school days for improved education have to do with custodial work? Whether custodial work is "hard" or not has nothing to do with the educating of kids. The OP is suggesting longer days....not longer school year. Point being they'd still have the two months to do all that "hard" work.

     

     
  11. This post has been removed.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from GregoryFromMeffa. Show GregoryFromMeffa's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    Those of us who can, send our children to parochial or private schools for the most part.

    ---------------------

    Or Charters, which are of course public.  Its just the unions who hate them.

     
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  14. This post has been removed.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    [QUOTE]
    WDYWN,

     

    Children are far from stupid.



    I dunno. I recall a whole lot of stupidity surrounding and sometimes issuing from myself when growing up.....

     

     

    I think a longer school day could be a good thing, but a longer school year far more important. The first few months of each school year were spent reminding everyone what they learned about at the end of the last year, and promptly forgot about over summer vacation.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    ..and virtually all educational experts will agree with you!  If you look at the top educational systems in the world..they all go year round and longer days. Our school year is based on agrarian society  that simply no longer exists.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Should Boston Public Schools have longer days?

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    In response to chiefhowie's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to andiejen's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to chiefhowie's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

    Alabama public schools will be under a new state-created academic accountability system that sets different goals for students in math and reading based on their race, economic status, ability to speak English and disabilities.” Alabama’s Plan 2020 “sets a different standard for students in each of several subgroups — American Indian, Asian/Pacific islander, black, English language learners, Hispanic, multirace, poverty, special education and white.”


     

     

     



    chiefhowie,

     

     

     

    Interesting.

    Does this 2020 plan set lower standards for these subgroups?

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    According to the source  it does . "To accell those students". 

     

     

    I think it's  to save money.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    chiefhowie,

     

    Do you think it does a disservice to these "subgroups"? I think it does.

    [/QUOTE]


    You both should probably read the policy before speculating. It will..in all likelihood cost more money than their old system. Nowhere in the policy does it state that it sets lower standards for minority and other groups. In fact there it includes a plan to bring all "groups" to the same 100 percent proficiency.

    Their new 2020 education plan has been approved by the DOE. Alabama should be applauded for addressing known weaknesses and putting a plan in place for improvement for all students.

     

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