So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

  1. This post has been removed.

     
  2. This post has been removed.

     
  3. This post has been removed.

     
  4. This post has been removed.

     
  5. This post has been removed.

     
  6. This post has been removed.

     
  7. This post has been removed.

     
  8. This post has been removed.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    Employer-based premiums just had the lowest increase in over 15 years.  Obamacare gets part (not all) of the credit.

    Employers blaming the rise of costs on Obamacare are just making excuses, while simultaneously forcing their employees to bear more of the burden.

    Most of them (the ones complaining) care more about their profits than about the benefits they provide to their employees...

    ...benefits which are still the #1 factor for retaining high-skilled workers.

    My premiums went up $1 ppp this year.  Four years ago, the increase was over $20.

     

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    Most of them (the ones complaining) care more about their profits than about the benefits they provide to their employees...

    ...benefits which are still the #1 factor for retaining high-skilled workers.

    My premiums went up $1 ppp this year.  Four years ago, the increase was over $20.

     

    You are so clueless as to how business works it pathetic.

    What business/company can stay competitive in any industry by charging more for healthcare to their employees than others in the industry??

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    Most of them (the ones complaining) care more about their profits than about the benefits they provide to their employees...

    ...benefits which are still the #1 factor for retaining high-skilled workers.

    My premiums went up $1 ppp this year.  Four years ago, the increase was over $20.

     

    You are so clueless as to how business works it pathetic.

    What business/company can stay competitive in any industry by charging more for healthcare to their employees than others in the industry??

     The industry will dictate. Companies (mostly small) that contract out to bigger companies must stay competitive to survive. The bigger companies WILL NOT increase their rates when the economy is on the verge of a recession!! So, the companies MUST find other ways to control cost (more part time workers etc) just to stay in business.

    Service companies will be hit the hardest! Its NOT about greedy corporations like you try to sell!!

     




     
  12. This post has been removed.

     
  13. This post has been removed.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    Or, you could look at it this way...

    The more valuable your insurance plan is, then the more your total compensation is.

     

    And even more on the bright side, the prospect of millions more insured is having positive ripple effects in the health care delivery market, where companies are starting to set up urgent care clinics and other health services in places where before there were none or very little.

    All of those empty blockbuster and circuit city stores will soon be filled, putting to work doctors, nurses, clerks and all manner of newly trained technicians and assistants.

    Pretty soon, hospitals will be mostly limited to longer-term care and major surgery, while the emergency and incidental services will be more widely distributed.

    The positive impacts of this and later reforms will be felt for decades to come.

     

     
  15. This post has been removed.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    Most of them (the ones complaining) care more about their profits than about the benefits they provide to their employees...

    ...benefits which are still the #1 factor for retaining high-skilled workers.

    My premiums went up $1 ppp this year.  Four years ago, the increase was over $20.

     

    You are so clueless as to how business works it pathetic.

    What business/company can stay competitive in any industry by charging more for healthcare to their employees than others in the industry??

     The industry will dictate. Companies (mostly small) that contract out to bigger companies must stay competitive to survive. The bigger companies WILL NOT increase their rates when the economy is on the verge of a recession!! So, the companies MUST find other ways to control cost (more part time workers etc) just to stay in business.

    Service companies will be hit the hardest! Its NOT about greedy corporations like you try to sell!!



    I know more than you think, because that's exactly what they're doing, albeit to varying degrees.  My company remains very competitive in a rapidly changing industry (IT), and benefits is one method.  Acquring other companies to spread the risk is another.

    But don't ask me, ask the OP and the Florida fast food tycoon who's surcharging customers (!) to pay for his employee's benefits.

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to WhichOnesPink2's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    Or, you could look at it this way...

    The more valuable your insurance plan is, then the more your total compensation is.

     

    And even more on the bright side, the prospect of millions more insured is having positive ripple effects in the health care delivery market, where companies are starting to set up urgent care clinics and other health services in places where before there were none or very little.

    All of those empty blockbuster and circuit city stores will soon be filled, putting to work doctors, nurses, clerks and all manner of newly trained technicians and assistants.

    Pretty soon, hospitals will be mostly limited to longer-term care and major surgery, while the emergency and incidental services will be more widely distributed.

    The positive impacts of this and later reforms will be felt for decades to come.

     



    Do you have links to articles about this? I had heard anything about this. Thanks!



    Sorry, but I heard it on the radio about a company basically setting up urgent care facility franchises (the name of the company escapes me...MaxiCare for something).  The model is similar to Aspen Dental, et al. - the growth of which was driven largely by the proliferation of employee-sponsored dental plans.  I didn't look into it further, but it makes sense given other health care market trends, like radiology facilities, drug stores, etc.

    During the past few years and during the recession, the only sector with continued growth has been health care, and the staggered implementation of Obamacare is part of the reason (along with the money to be made).

    And to your other question, as I understand it, the wider adoption of alternative health plans, including HDHP plans, is partially resulting from changes in the ACA law.  More plans with lower premiums end up lowering the increases of premiums for other, existing plans.  This is to say nothing of the tax implications/savings from FSAs, which were high to start with in order to alleviate the shock to carriers but are now being reduced as coverage continues to flatten.

    I'll defer to your own industry experience to correct or affirm these points, but I'm pretty sure I rightly explained what I heard from others on the insurance side.

     

     
  18. This post has been removed.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

    Get ready to pay more for your Grand Slam.

    A Florida restaurateur who operates roughly 40 Denny’s locations and five Hurricane Grill & Wings franchises throughout the state intends to add a 5 percent surcharge to customers’ bills to offset costs from ObamaCare beginning in January 2014 when the Affordable Care Act is fully implemented.

    “People are trying to find ways to avoid the penalties and to avoid having to pay for ObamaCare,” John Metz told FoxNews.com. “Everyone’s looking for a way to not have to provide insurance for their employees. It’s essentially a huge tax on all us business people.”

    To further offset the costs, Metz, who oversees roughly 1,200 employees as president and CEO of RREMC Restaurants, LLC, said he also will slash most of the staff's time to fewer than 30 hours per week. That change will be announced to employees next month, he said.

    “I want to explain it to everybody, to let them know what’s coming down the pike,” he said. “We like to keep our employees informed.”

    The changes will force some front-of-the-house employees to look for second jobs, Metz said, but he simply cannot afford the penalties associated with ObamaCare.



    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/11/15/florida-restaurateur-to-impose-surcharge-for-obamacare/#ixzz2CJ7M02dN




    Well..first..I never eat at Denny's. It's remarkable that it's still in business..really.

    If my local diner suddenly raised the price of my chocolate chip pancakes or french toast breakfast by 5% in order for the nice waitress who serves my food, fills my coffee and engages in friendly chat, is able to have a quality health care plan...then I say go for it. I mean..the average breakfast costs..what 5-10 dollars all told? So..what are we talking about..an extra  50 cents or so? You mean to tell me that it's not worth 50 cents to for that waitress to have quality health care?


    My point is...let the companies pass on the cost to the customers. We are not talking big bucks here.

     

    BTW...businesses are always looking for ways not to pay costs. This is nothing new. If employers are slashing jobs or people to cut corners to pay for increased health coverage for their employees..then they either don't know how to run a business..or better yet..it's a valid argument for a single payer system which takes the employer right out of the equation.

     

    Refresh my memory..how many jobs did Romneycare cost in MA? Are MA businesses just better run..?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Reubenhop. Show Reubenhop's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

    Hardworking American taxpayers paying extra to provide health care for tens of millions of criminals sounds.. fair (to the criminals).

    If I stole into this country.. what motivation do I have to do anything. I don't have to work, I get free housing, food, education, insurance, no taxes, no tax penalties....

    There no incentive.



    Obamacare has not changed whether illegal immigrants get medical treatment.  Your rant is per usual mindless.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to WhichOnesPink2's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to WhichOnesPink2's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    Or, you could look at it this way...

    The more valuable your insurance plan is, then the more your total compensation is.

     

    And even more on the bright side, the prospect of millions more insured is having positive ripple effects in the health care delivery market, where companies are starting to set up urgent care clinics and other health services in places where before there were none or very little.

    All of those empty blockbuster and circuit city stores will soon be filled, putting to work doctors, nurses, clerks and all manner of newly trained technicians and assistants.

    Pretty soon, hospitals will be mostly limited to longer-term care and major surgery, while the emergency and incidental services will be more widely distributed.

    The positive impacts of this and later reforms will be felt for decades to come.

     



    Do you have links to articles about this? I had heard anything about this. Thanks!



    Sorry, but I heard it on the radio about a company basically setting up urgent care facility franchises (the name of the company escapes me...MaxiCare for something).  The model is similar to Aspen Dental, et al. - the growth of which was driven largely by the proliferation of employee-sponsored dental plans.  I didn't look into it further, but it makes sense given other health care market trends, like radiology facilities, drug stores, etc.

    During the past few years and during the recession, the only sector with continued growth has been health care, and the staggered implementation of Obamacare is part of the reason (along with the money to be made).

    And to your other question, as I understand it, the wider adoption of alternative health plans, including HDHP plans, is partially resulting from changes in the ACA law.  More plans with lower premiums end up lowering the increases of premiums for other, existing plans.  This is to say nothing of the tax implications/savings from FSAs, which were high to start with in order to alleviate the shock to carriers but are now being reduced as coverage continues to flatten.

    I'll defer to your own industry experience to correct or affirm these points, but I'm pretty sure I rightly explained what I heard from others on the insurance side.

     



    The only way lower premiums from other plans can have an affect on a given employers current plans is if those other lower premium plans are offered. That's not always the case. And even if that happens, a current insurer can't go too low or they will lose money outright. The current insurer always has the benefit of knowing the groups claims experience. I ran into this many times where another carrier would try to "buy" the business by undercutting the current insurers rates. Only thing that would do is cause the next year renewal to be even higher because of the original rates offered being too low. It's a big game.

    Like I said, many, many factors go into underwriting coverage. Not as simple to say one thing (not saying you are saying this) is causing this or that.

     




    Fair enough.  I didn't intend to draw a direct causation-correlation line without couching it in terms you describe more specifically than I could...except by way of saying that, the way the law is constructed and the way the law is being implemented gradually are bound to exert downward pressure on premiums even as health care costs increase.

    I think we've seen that both premiums and costs are still rising but much more slowly than before.  As you say, more time will pass before we know the causes for certain, especially since the major provisions (and state exchanges) are not yet fully in effect.

     

     

     
  22. This post has been removed.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: So besides driving the cost of healthcare UP and forcing businesses to cut employee hours BACK...

    In response to NO MO O's comment:

     It may be a global economy but we cannot afford to become the human trashcan for the world. Our generosity and kindness has been used against us.



    You're still here, aren't you...?  Be thankful.

    That is, until you emigrate or secede or whatever you do to get away from all the brown people you can't stand....

     

     
  24. This post has been removed.

     
  25. This post has been removed.

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share