US Oil Production

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName99. Show UserName99's posts

    US Oil Production

    US may soon become world's top oil producer

     

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. oil output is surging so fast that the United States could soon overtake Saudi Arabia as the world’s biggest producer.

    Driven by high prices and new drilling methods, U.S. production of crude and other liquid hydrocarbons is on track to rise 7 percent this year to an average of 10.9 million barrels per day. This will be the fourth straight year of crude increases and the biggest single-year gain since 1951.

    The boom has surprised even the experts.

    ‘‘Five years ago, if I or anyone had predicted today’s production growth, people would have thought we were crazy,’’ says Jim Burkhard, head of oil markets research at IHS CERA, an energy consulting firm.

    The Energy Department forecasts that U.S. production of crude and other liquid hydrocarbons, which includes biofuels, will average 11.4 million barrels per day next year. That would be a record for the U.S. and just below Saudi Arabia’s output of 11.6 million barrels. Citibank forecasts U.S. production could reach 13 million to 15 million barrels per day by 2020, helping to make North America ‘‘the new Middle East.’’

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    we only use 19 million bbls a day

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    The ol' "Drain America First" strategy.  Personally, I think it's idiotic not to import as much oil as we can.  I would prefer being one of the last countries to use up all of it's oil and not the first.

     
  4. This post has been removed.

     
  5. This post has been removed.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName99. Show UserName99's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    In response to NO MO O's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Actually...

    Production has been rising for years and hits a new peak every year.

    Yet what good does that do us when we ship it our 'new' friends in China.

    Should not domestic production remain domestic thereby lowering the transportation cost?

    Should this increased volume translate to less imports and lower consumer prices?

    This writer wonders what the impact would be if we simply kept it all home?.. No more dirty Venezualian oil ? Minimal dependence on the Arabs?

    Energy independence is still only a phrase.

    [/QUOTE]


    So you would regulate who corporations can sell their product to?  Nationalize our oil maybe? 

     
  7. This post has been removed.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    In response to Newtster's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    WHat is the point? Are you now in favor of ramping up production? How about drilling in that park in Alaska? Off the coast of California, Virginia, you for that now? WHat happened to global warming?WHat about the pipeline? Are you for that now?

    Another phony moonbat. Oh look look, we like oil too! Liar.

    [/QUOTE]


    I am in awe of your ignorance !

     
  9. This post has been removed.

     
  10. This post has been removed.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    et what good does that do us when we ship it our 'new' friends in China.

     

    Well, for one thing it would lower our balance of trade problem with China.

     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    In response to NO MO O's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to UserName99's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to NO MO O's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Actually...

    Production has been rising for years and hits a new peak every year.

    Yet what good does that do us when we ship it our 'new' friends in China.

    Should not domestic production remain domestic thereby lowering the transportation cost?

    Should this increased volume translate to less imports and lower consumer prices?

    This writer wonders what the impact would be if we simply kept it all home?.. No more dirty Venezualian oil ? Minimal dependence on the Arabs?

    Energy independence is still only a phrase.

    [/QUOTE]


    So you would regulate who corporations can sell their product to?  Nationalize our oil maybe? 

    [/QUOTE]


    You mean like health care?

    [/QUOTE]


     

    You should take it up with the oil companies. While your at it..take up the high gas prices with them as well.

     
  13. This post has been removed.

     
  14. This post has been removed.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    No keeping all the oil we produce at home would increase costs because oil is globally traded commodity and the shock of taking US oil and oil demand off of the global market would immediately drive up costs everywhere else hurting our enemies and allies alike. 

    The result would be coordinated economic warfare on the US by every country feeling the pinch of the new inflated prices.  Countries with especially weak economies would be driven back into recession as larger countries followed suit and began either creating exclusive deals for access to oil, or similarly stopped exporting.  The global economy would grind to a halt.

    Nevermind the fact that the United States lacks the refining capacity to turn the crude into usable gasoline at a pace to satisify the needs of every driver in the country just trying to get to work or the grocery store.  How do we priorotize demand for the fuel required for buses, public transportation, military vehicles, air travel, and other needs.  The strategic reserve would quickly evaporate.  And in the years it would take to build an adequate capacity to just meet daily demand US gas prices would skyrocket to a degree that 4 dollar gas would quickly become the good old days. 

     
  16. This post has been removed.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    Yes the miracle pipleline that TransCanada has admitted will only create 6000 full time jobs for a period of 2 years or so.  That's a game changer right there.  Oh, and did you see the EXISTING pipeline was shut down for 5 days last week due to what TransCanada called "anomaly"?  The existing pipeline has had at least 12 spills since it was constructed. 

    As for the panacea of keeping all we produce, just ask Canada how that has worked.  Their oil consumption is almost 60% domestically produced (much higher than in the US) and yet their gas prices are actually higher than the US. 

     
  18. This post has been removed.

     
  19. This post has been removed.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    In response to WhichOnesPink2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DamainAllen's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Yes the miracle pipleline that TransCanada has admitted will only create 6000 full time jobs for a period of 2 years or so.  That's a game changer right there.  Oh, and did you see the EXISTING pipeline was shut down for 5 days last week due to what TransCanada called "anomaly"?  The existing pipeline has had at least 12 spills since it was constructed. 

    As for the panacea of keeping all we produce, just ask Canada how that has worked.  Their oil consumption is almost 60% domestically produced (much higher than in the US) and yet their gas prices are actually higher than the US. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Some would argue 6,000 jobs for even 2 years is a damn good thing. Those would be the people who are currently struggling to find steady work and would welcome any steady work even if just for two years. Because in two years the economy could be better and therefore other jobs pop up. I think you take for granted that you have a job.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    Certainly 6000 jobs is great for the 6000 people that would have them.  Now what of the millions of people across several states whose drinking water, viable farmland, and local environments would be jeopardized by pipeline technology that ALWAYS springs a leak sooner or later.  How do you explain to large population centers that their freshwater has been fouled because we just had to sacrifice safety so that we could add 6000 jobs for 2 years?  What is the price for clean water and land in America's heartland? I take it you beleive the answer is 6000 jobs?

    What about the objections of the states whose land the pipeline would have to travel over to get to the gulf of mexico?  And speaking of the gulf, why do you think they want the extension to go there.  The current pipeline terminates in Illinois.  If the extension is supposed to a boon for US domestic consumption then why does the oil need to travel to one of the world busiest shipping ports? 

     
  21. This post has been removed.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: US Oil Production

    In response to NO MO O's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Hang on the Damian... unlike Ambassador Stevens... help IS on the way. Marine Mittens will be here in a couple of months.

    Only 12 spills? Acceptable casualties.

    We can do better than Canada.

     

    I'll vote for an entrepreneur over a sack o manure.  

    [/QUOTE]


    The oil belongs to Canada.  Its Canada's project.  So what is it that "we" are doing aside from supplying labor and right of passage over US land?

    And 12 spills may be acceptable to you, but I imagine the people likely to be directly affected feel quite differently.  That may be why the Nebraska state legislature, GOP controlled and with a GOP governor were opposed to the pipleline extension going over their land.  They must be commies, right?

    Look, obviously you don't know what you are talking about, so I am not going to do this dance with you.  The facts are out there and serious people with skin in the game obviously don't have as cavalier an attitude as you about the potential risks the pipeline creates.  Especially when we know the existing pipeline, that is fairly new, has had so many leaks already. 

     

Share