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We torture another one to death.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from sprague1953. Show sprague1953's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    I absolutely agree with NWDYW that the government should not have the right to torture people. No matter which side you are on the death penalty, hopefully you agree with this.

    These botched executions are the result of the shortage of one key lethal injection drug. Sodium thiopental.

    Last month, Hospira—the sole U.S. company approved to manufacture the drug—announced it will no longer produce sodium thiopental.

    A nationwide shortage of sodium thiopental, an anesthetic that is part of the three-drug cocktail used in lethal injections, has thrown capital punishment in the United States into disarray, delaying executions and forcing the change of execution protocols in several states.

    Until the problem caused by the massive shortage of sodium thiopental is properly solved, IMO I believe all executions should be put on hold so we do not have any more situations such as Arizona, Ohio or Oklahoma.

     

     

     

     

    Lethal Injection Drug Shortage
    By Jennifer Horne CSG Associate Director of Policy and Special Libraries


    Texas has 317 inmates on death row, but only enough of a key lethal injection drug to execute two of them.

    Ohio has just one dose of the drug left.


    A nationwide shortage of sodium thiopental, an anesthetic that is part of the three-drug cocktail used in lethal injections, has thrown capital punishment in the United States into disarray, delaying executions and forcing the change of execution protocols in several states.


    Last month, Hospira—the sole U.S. company approved to manufacture the drug—announced it will no longer produce sodium thiopental. This move followed a global campaign by death penalty opponents and pressure by Italian government officials after the company sought to shift production of the drug to an Italian plant.
    The shortage of sodium thiopental has forced the 35 states using lethal injection to scramble for any remaining stock and to explore alternatives.


    “Many states will have to change their method of execution, which means regulatory changes that have to be approved and lengthy court challenges,” says Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center. “In many states, this could take months, if not years, delaying executions.”


    Some states—including California, Arizona and Nebraska—were able to obtain the drug from suppliers in England and India. The British government has since banned such shipments. A class-action lawsuit against the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to allow the importation of the drug into the country without adequate inspection or quality checks is pending. Death penalty opponents have raised questions about the quality of the drugs, arguing that if the drugs were expired or otherwise failed to work effectively, inmates could suffer significant pain, violating the ban on cruel and unusual punishment.


    Whether executions will have to be delayed depends largely on the ability of states to make changes to their lethal injection protocols without legislative or regulatory changes.


    In some states, switching to a new drug protocol is easily done. For an execution in December, Oklahoma replaced sodium thiopental with pentobarbital, a drug commonly used to euthanize animals. It is believed to be the first time the drug was used in a lethal injection. Ohio plans to do away the three-drug cocktail altogether..Beginning in March, the state will use a single dose of pentobarbital, becoming the first state to use the drug alone. This protocol is untested and many states are watching Ohio before changing their own protocols.


    Tennessee is considering such a drug switch, which would not take long for the state to implement. Dorinda Carter, spokeswoman for the Tennessee Department of Correction, said such a change does not require new legislation and could be done after a departmental review.
    However, other states have long regulatory and review processes. In Maryland, for instance, the current protocol under review has been withdrawn because changes will be so substantial that the rules will have to be completely revised.


    “Our current proposed regulations have been withdrawn, so the process for writing new proposed regulations starts again. There is no set timetable for that process," said Rick Binetti, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services,
    Dieter explained that many other states face a lengthy regulatory process, including California and Kentucky. In addition, any change in the drug or its supplier will likely lead to lawsuits from inmates facing execution.

    Dieter said he expects there will be legal challenges in almost every state currently using sodium thiopental.
    “Lawyers will challenge the use of new drug protocols or drugs that are imported from overseas,” he said “Either way, there is enough of a change to warrant a challenge.”
    In the meantime, states continue to seek additional sources of sodium thiopental. On Jan. 25, 13 states asked the U.S. Department of Justice for help in identifying sources for the scarce drug or by making federal supplies available to states.

     

    http://www.csg.org/pubs/capitolideas/enews/issue65_4.aspx

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hansoribrother. Show Hansoribrother's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    They should either get the drug protocol right or use a firing squad. 

    In the meantime a claim of torture? How do you know?

    tor·ture
    ˈtôrCHər/Submit
    noun
    1.
    the action or practice of inflicting severe pain on someone as a punishment or to force them to do or say something, or for the pleasure of the person inflicting the pain.
    synonyms: infliction of pain, abuse, ill-treatment, maltreatment, persecution; More
    great physical or mental suffering or anxiety.
    "the torture I've gone through because of loving you so"
    synonyms: torment, agony, suffering, pain, anguish, misery, distress, heartbreak, affliction, scourge, trauma, wretchedness; More
    a cause of suffering or anxiety.
    plural noun: tortures
    "dances were absolute torture because I was so small"
    verb
    verb: torture; 3rd person present: tortures; past tense: tortured; past participle: tortured; gerund or present participle: torturing
    1.
    inflict severe pain on.
    "most of the victims had been brutally tortured"
    synonyms: inflict pain on, ill-treat, abuse, mistreat, maltreat, persecute

     

    Just because he was gasping for air does not mean he was conscious or in pain. 

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    anybody ever see the movie " No Escape" ..... that is the answer ... put all the violent criminals on an island and let them fend for themselves .

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.


    Death penalty opponents point to the interminable delays before the death penalty is implemented. Very valid point. However, the decades-long delays are caused by death penalty opponents, throwing up endless roadblocks and endless appeals.

    Death penalty opponents point to the problems with obtaining the drugs needed for executions, resulting in botched executions. Very valid point, it is wrong to have an execution take two hours.

    But again, the reason is death penalty opponents, intimidating drug companies, filing lawsuits, etc.

    Instead of convincing the public of the validity of their position, death penalty opponents gum up the system making executions virtually impossible. 

    And they have succeeded. The public supports the death penalty, but dont seem to care that the system is broken, few are executed and it takes endless millions of dollars in appeals and decades to implement... 

    As a society, we are better off not having the death penalty,than the current joke of a system...

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hansoribrother. Show Hansoribrother's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    Doesn't the Constitution require a quick and speedy trial? That isn't just for the defendant. It is for the public and for justice. 25 years between the original sentence and execution of the sentence is not very speedy.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from sprague1953. Show sprague1953's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    anybody ever see the movie " No Escape" ..... that is the answer ... put all the violent criminals on an island and let them fend for themselves .



    Sister,

    We do not have to see a movie.

    Britain already did that when they turned Australia into a penal colony.

    And are there not two major points of imprisoning human beings. Punishment AND rehabilitation.

    Where is the rehabilitation in "No Escape"?

    Most people who go to prison do come out one day. Just punishment is not the answer. These people will be walking your and my streets at some point. Without continued attempts at rehabilitation, who do you think they are going to take it out on? 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from sprague1953. Show sprague1953's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    We are the ONLY first world country...the ONLY...that still allows the death penalty.

    At the very least we should be sure when the government is putting a human being to death, there are no more botched executions as we have recently had in Ohio, Oklahoma and now in Arizona.

    These people are not going anywhere. We need to wait until a new protocol can be developed that is as effective and humane as the former protocol.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to sprague1953's comment:

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    anybody ever see the movie " No Escape" ..... that is the answer ... put all the violent criminals on an island and let them fend for themselves .



    Sister,

    We do not have to see a movie.

    Britain already did that when they turned Australia into a penal colony.

    And are there not two major points of imprisoning human beings. Punishment AND rehabilitation.

    Where is the rehabilitation in "No Escape"?

    Most people who go to prison do come out one day. Just punishment is not the answer. These people will be walking your and my streets at some point. Without continued attempts at rehabilitation, who do you think they are going to take it out on? 




    I'll meet you halfway because that is the kind of guy that I am ..... habitual violent criminals

    "fool me once shame on you , fool me twice same on me " - unknown

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from sprague1953. Show sprague1953's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    In response to sprague1953's comment:

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    anybody ever see the movie " No Escape" ..... that is the answer ... put all the violent criminals on an island and let them fend for themselves .



    Sister,

    We do not have to see a movie.

    Britain already did that when they turned Australia into a penal colony.

    And are there not two major points of imprisoning human beings. Punishment AND rehabilitation.

    Where is the rehabilitation in "No Escape"?

    Most people who go to prison do come out one day. Just punishment is not the answer. These people will be walking your and my streets at some point. Without continued attempts at rehabilitation, who do you think they are going to take it out on? 




    I'll meet you halfway because that is the kind of guy that I am ..... habitual violent criminals

    "fool me once shame on you , fool me twice same on me " - unknown



    Sister,

    At least we are getting closer. 

    Btw, I helped get one of your posts restored.

    "I love how people gloat about millions of people losing healthcare coverage .

     

    "The idea that some lives matter less is the root of all that is wrong with the world" .... Dr Paul Farmer"

    The above post had been removed from the federal courts deal blow to Obamacare thread.

    I reported it to that new Moderator thread. MM restored it. It obviously did not violate BDC posting policy.

    You can read what MM said in his/her thread. It looks like this is off to a pretty nice start. MM also wrote some other things which I guess are going to be part of the "transition". They sound pretty good.

    If I am reading MM right, the outside moderating company is on its way out of this forum, and more BDC staff members are coming in. So not like the Sox forum, where the posters run the show, but much better then now.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to sprague1953's comment:


    In response to Sistersledge's comment:


    In response to sprague1953's comment:


    In response to Sistersledge's comment:


    anybody ever see the movie " No Escape" ..... that is the answer ... put all the violent criminals on an island and let them fend for themselves .




    Sister,


    We do not have to see a movie.


    Britain already did that when they turned Australia into a penal colony.


    And are there not two major points of imprisoning human beings. Punishment AND rehabilitation.


    Where is the rehabilitation in "No Escape"?


    Most people who go to prison do come out one day. Just punishment is not the answer. These people will be walking your and my streets at some point. Without continued attempts at rehabilitation, who do you think they are going to take it out on? 





    I'll meet you halfway because that is the kind of guy that I am ..... habitual violent criminals


    "fool me once shame on you , fool me twice same on me " - unknown




    Sister,


    At least we are getting closer. 


    Btw, I helped get one of your posts restored.


    "I love how people gloat about millions of people losing healthcare coverage .


     


    "The idea that some lives matter less is the root of all that is wrong with the world" .... Dr Paul Farmer"


    The above post had been removed from the federal courts deal blow to Obamacare thread.


    I reported it to that new Moderator thread. MM restored it. It obviously did not violate BDC posting policy.


    You can read what MM said in his/her thread. It looks like this is off to a pretty nice start. MM also wrote some other things which I guess are going to be part of the "transition". They sound pretty good.


    If I am reading MM right, the outside moderating company is on its way out of this forum, and more BDC staff members are coming in. So not like the Sox forum, where the posters run the show, but much better then now.





    Thanks sprague 1953 .....


     


    btw I love using sarcasm to make a point

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from sprague1953. Show sprague1953's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    Sister,

    It was a great post. Both what you said and the quote you used. Probably more effective then a lot of the longer posts in that thread...including mine.

    I had replied to it to tell you so, so I had captured your post word for word and therefore was able to report it word for word to MM.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to sprague1953's comment:

    We are the ONLY first world country...the ONLY...that still allows the death penalty.

    At the very least we should be sure when the government is putting a human being to death, there are no more botched executions as we have recently had in Ohio, Oklahoma and now in Arizona.

    These people are not going anywhere. We need to wait until a new protocol can be developed that is as effective and humane as the former protocol.




    Well said!!

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    They should use the guillotine.  It's quick.  It's reliable.  I'd rather have my head taken in a split second than to die over a 2 hour span.  Plus it's gruesome.  If we are going to execute people, it should be shocking.  

     
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  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName9. Show UserName9's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to sprague1953's comment:

    We are the ONLY first world country...the ONLY...that still allows the death penalty.

    At the very least we should be sure when the government is putting a human being to death, there are no more botched executions as we have recently had in Ohio, Oklahoma and now in Arizona.

    These people are not going anywhere. We need to wait until a new protocol can be developed that is as effective and humane as the former protocol.




    Japan still kills its own citizens too.  But your point is valid.....we are not in good company when you look at the list of countries with the death penalty.

     
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  18. This post has been removed.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    I'm telling you - the guillotine.  Sure, at first it sounds ghoulish.  But is there anything faster or less painful?  Set it up so the they condemned never see it.  Give them a sedative.  strap them face down.  And swoosh - its over.  They never see it.  Sure, it's messy, which taking a person's life should be messy.  But for the condemned, it really is the quickest way to go.  It's faster than hanging.  Better than a firing squad, which could miss the heart.  Set it up so that at the appointed time, the blade comes down.

    If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to NowWhatDoYouWant's comment:

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

     

     

    I'm telling you - the guillotine.  Sure, at first it sounds ghoulish.  But is there anything faster or less painful?  Set it up so the they condemned never see it.  Give them a sedative.  strap them face down.  And swoosh - its over.  They never see it.  Sure, it's messy, which taking a person's life should be messy.  But for the condemned, it really is the quickest way to go.  It's faster than hanging.  Better than a firing squad, which could miss the heart.  Set it up so that at the appointed time, the blade comes down.

     

    If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.

     

     




    Agree fully.

     

     

    Guillotine or double-barreled shotgun blast to the back of the head.

     

    I don't think anyone who supports the death penalty has any business getting squeamish about it.




    Agree!!

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to NowWhatDoYouWant's comment:


    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:



     


    It's kind of messy and its tough on the condemned person's family.  I like the gas chamber not sure why they stopped using it.


    I'm telling you - the guillotine.  Sure, at first it sounds ghoulish.  But is there anything faster or less painful?  Set it up so the they condemned never see it.  Give them a sedative.  strap them face down.  And swoosh - its over.  They never see it.  Sure, it's messy, which taking a person's life should be messy.  But for the condemned, it really is the quickest way to go.  It's faster than hanging.  Better than a firing squad, which could miss the heart.  Set it up so that at the appointed time, the blade comes down.


     


    If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.


     


     





    Agree fully.


     


     


    Guillotine or double-barreled shotgun blast to the back of the head.


     


    I don't think anyone who supports the death penalty has any business getting squeamish about it.





    [object HTMLDivElement]


    From Slate the new best way to administer the death penalty.  Gas chamber filled with nitrogen, one experiences raptures of the deep before they expire.


     


    This new proposed method, known as nitrogen asphyxiation, seals the condemned in an airtight chamber pumped full of nitrogen gas, causing death by a lack of oxygen. Nitrogen gas has yet to be put to the test as a method of capital punishment—no country currently uses it for state-sanctioned executions. But people do die accidentally of nitrogen asphyxiation, and usually never know what hit them. (It’s even possible that death by nitrogen gas is mildly euphoric. Deep-sea divers exposed to an excess of nitrogen develop a narcosis, colorfully known as “raptures of the deep,” similar to drunkenness or nitrous oxide inhalation.)


     


    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html


     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:


    In response to NowWhatDoYouWant's comment:


    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:


     



     


    It's kind of messy and its tough on the condemned person's family.  I like the gas chamber not sure why they stopped using it.


     


    I'm telling you - the guillotine.  Sure, at first it sounds ghoulish.  But is there anything faster or less painful?  Set it up so the they condemned never see it.  Give them a sedative.  strap them face down.  And swoosh - its over.  They never see it.  Sure, it's messy, which taking a person's life should be messy.  But for the condemned, it really is the quickest way to go.  It's faster than hanging.  Better than a firing squad, which could miss the heart.  Set it up so that at the appointed time, the blade comes down.


    If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.


     





    Agree fully.


    Guillotine or double-barreled shotgun blast to the back of the head.


    I don't think anyone who supports the death penalty has any business getting squeamish about it.


     





    [object HTMLDivElement]


     


    From Slate the new best way to administer the death penalty.  Gas chamber filled with nitrogen, one experiences raptures of the deep before they expire.


     


     


     


    This new proposed method, known as nitrogen asphyxiation, seals the condemned in an airtight chamber pumped full of nitrogen gas, causing death by a lack of oxygen. Nitrogen gas has yet to be put to the test as a method of capital punishment—no country currently uses it for state-sanctioned executions. But people do die accidentally of nitrogen asphyxiation, and usually never know what hit them. (It’s even possible that death by nitrogen gas is mildly euphoric. Deep-sea divers exposed to an excess of nitrogen develop a narcosis, colorfully known as “raptures of the deep,” similar to drunkenness or nitrous oxide inhalation.)


     


     


     


    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html


     


     





    mmj,


    That is a very interesting article you found at slate. "Death By Nitrogen".  I read the whole article twice.


    This is an issue I have been struggling with greatly. Even more since the three botched executions in Ohio, Oklahoma and now Arizona.


    I of course knew about about the export ban , but not until these three states tried new protocols that went horribly wrong did I really realize what this was going to lead to. IMO I believe all execution should be put on halt until we find a protocol that is as humane as the former protocol.


    Since we are the only country in the first world that still sanctions the death penalty, I believe if we are still going to sanction the state killing of a human being, it must be in as humane a way as possible. What they did should have no bearing on it.


    I particularly liked the following from the same article.


     


    "You can oppose the death penalty and still see the merit in making executions more humane. As Boer Deng and Dahlia Lithwick argued in Slate, opponents of the death penalty inadvertently have made lethal injection less safe, by forcing prison officials into using inferior methods and substandard drug providers. As the states struggle to obtain drugs, such as pentobarbital, for lethal injections because of an export ban by the European Union, lethal injection has been turned from a method of execution into a medical experiment.


    Proponents say that death by nitrogen, by contrast, adheres to the constitutional prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. The condemned prisoner would detect no abnormal sensation breathing the odorless, tasteless gas, and would not undergo the painful experience of suffocation, which is caused by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream, not by lack of oxygen."


     




 
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    In response to andiejen's comment:

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

     

     

    In response to NowWhatDoYouWant's comment:

     

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    It's kind of messy and its tough on the condemned person's family.  I like the gas chamber not sure why they stopped using it.

     

     

     

    I'm telling you - the guillotine.  Sure, at first it sounds ghoulish.  But is there anything faster or less painful?  Set it up so the they condemned never see it.  Give them a sedative.  strap them face down.  And swoosh - its over.  They never see it.  Sure, it's messy, which taking a person's life should be messy.  But for the condemned, it really is the quickest way to go.  It's faster than hanging.  Better than a firing squad, which could miss the heart.  Set it up so that at the appointed time, the blade comes down.

     

    If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.

     

     

     

     




    Agree fully.

     

     

    Guillotine or double-barreled shotgun blast to the back of the head.

     

    I don't think anyone who supports the death penalty has any business getting squeamish about it.

     

     

     




    [object HTMLDivElement]

     

     

     

    From Slate the new best way to administer the death penalty.  Gas chamber filled with nitrogen, one experiences raptures of the deep before they expire.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    This new proposed method, known as nitrogen asphyxiation, seals the condemned in an airtight chamber pumped full of nitrogen gas, causing death by a lack of oxygen. Nitrogen gas has yet to be put to the test as a method of capital punishment—no country currently uses it for state-sanctioned executions. But people do die accidentally of nitrogen asphyxiation, and usually never know what hit them. (It’s even possible that death by nitrogen gas is mildly euphoric. Deep-sea divers exposed to an excess of nitrogen develop a narcosis, colorfully known as “raptures of the deep,” similar to drunkenness or nitrous oxide inhalation.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/05/death_by_nitrogen_gas_will_the_new_method_of_execution_save_the_death_penalty.html

     

     

     

     

     



     

    mmj,

     

    That is a very interesting article you found at slate. "Death By Nitrogen".  I read the whole article twice.

     

    This is an issue I have been struggling with greatly. Even more since the three botched executions in Ohio, Oklahoma and now Arizona.

     

    I of course knew about about the export ban , but not until these three states tried new protocols that went horribly wrong did I really realize what this was going to lead to. IMO I believe all execution should be put on halt until we find a protocol that is as humane as the former protocol.

     

    Since we are the only country in the first world that still sanctions the death penalty, I believe if we are still going to sanction the state killing of a human being, it must be in as humane a way as possible. What they did should have no bearing on it.

     

    I particularly liked the following from the same article.

     

     

     

    "You can oppose the death penalty and still see the merit in making executions more humane. As Boer Deng and Dahlia Lithwick argued in Slate, opponents of the death penalty inadvertently have made lethal injection less safe, by forcing prison officials into using inferior methods and substandard drug providers. As the states struggle to obtain drugs, such as pentobarbital, for lethal injections because of an export ban by the European Union, lethal injection has been turned from a method of execution into a medical experiment.

     

    Proponents say that death by nitrogen, by contrast, adheres to the constitutional prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. The condemned prisoner would detect no abnormal sensation breathing the odorless, tasteless gas, and would not undergo the painful experience of suffocation, which is caused by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream, not by lack of oxygen."

     

     

     






    I think the point DWL, WDYWN and myself were trying to make is based on this line from DWL's comment above. ..."If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.

    In other words, less people would be advocating for the death penalty if it weren't such a "sterile" and removed process.

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  • You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    This shouldn't be that difficult, people do it everyday. Even accidently. If somehow I were in that position I'd want some heroin, a big pile of qualudes, and a couple of forties.

    See ya later, bu bye!

     

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    Think for yourself, question authority.

     
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from andiejen. Show andiejen's posts

    Re: We torture another one to death.

    miscricket,

    "I think the point DWL, WDYWN and myself were trying to make is based on this line from DWL's comment above. ..."If we are going to sentence people to death, the actual act should be disturbing.

    In other words, less people would be advocating for the death penalty if it weren't such a "sterile" and removed process."

    The three of you did make that point and I see the merits behind that way of thinking.

    IMO, a certain amount of people will advocate for the death penalty regardless of how it is administered.

    Some people now, who still advocate for the death penalty, believe that executions should be halted until we have a protocol that is as painless as the former protocol.

    Given human nature, some people might be even stronger supporters of the death penalty if it was not so "sterile". So many people feel that those who are executed just go to sleep while their victims suffered horribly. That life in prison is worse than lethal injection. 

    I already stated my view on this subject. 

     
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