WSJ: at least 41% improperly claimed 'Obamaphone'; program cost $2.2 billion...

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    Re: WSJ: at least 41% improperly claimed 'Obamaphone'; program cost $2.2 billion...

    In response to WhichOnesPink2's comment:

    Airborne missing the actual point of the OP...what a shocker...




    The point of this thread is to childishly inject the word 'Obamaphone'

     
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    Re: WSJ: at least 41% improperly claimed 'Obamaphone'; program cost $2.2 billion...

    http://www.humanevents.com/2013/02/12/a-billion-dollars-in-obamaphone-fraud/

    Forty-one percent.  If that percentage holds up across the TracFone and Nexus subscriber bases, we’re talking about nearly a billion dollars in ObamaPhone fraud.  The FCC thinks its tougher new eligibility requirements – which any sane manager would have put into effect on Day One, assuming this insane giveaway program should exist at all – will save $2 billion over the next three years.  They’re also trying to crack down on corporate fraud related to the program.

    “The program rules we inherited were designed for the age of the rotary phone and failed to protect the program from abuse,” said FCC chairman Julius Genachowski.  Gee, ya think?  Guess you guys never saw this newfangled “cell phone” technology coming!  It only took this brain-dead bureaucracy four decades to figure out the rotary-phone era was over.  But let’s put them in charge of health care!

    And while we’re on the subject, at what point in that bygone rotary-phone error did anyone with a lick of common sense think a “self-certified” welfare program with lifetime no-questions-asked membership was a good plan?  Follow-up question: what happened to the original idea of putting land-line phones in the homes of the poor?  That should be good enough to give them access to the communications technology they need to search for jobs, or call for emergency assistance.  Ah, but you see, it’s not fair to “stigmatize” them in a world where everyone else has a phone in his pocket.  And the task of wiring homes for land lines is relatively finite – the project would near completion and spending would diminish.  That simply won’t do in this age of ever-expanding Big Government!  Much better to have a completely open-ended program that will spend money forever, on the perpetual quest to slip the latest cell phone tech into every beneficiary pocket.

    The idea that any provider would be allowed to keep their results confidential, or that any Obamaphone subscriber would be allowed to take a pass on responding to the eligibility survey, is absolutely absurd.  I can’t think of a more profound gesture of contempt toward the taxpayers who fund this garbage.  The notion that hard-working Americans would be asked to surrender another dime in higher taxes to fund programs sick with fraud and abuse, programs that have brought us the lunacy of welfare dependents chatting away on “free” cell phones, is offensive.

     
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    Re: WSJ: at least 41% improperly claimed 'Obamaphone'; program cost $2.2 billion...

    In response to airborne-rgr's comment:

    Only a wingnut could whine about a program THEY put in place, which was riddled with waste and abuse, and then try and blame the only admin in 30yrs that has actually done something to eliminate fraud and save money.

     Geepers you are freakin HILARIOUS!!!!!



    The Obamaphone program tripled in size during the Obama Administration, and you claim that Obama's bureaucrats are "eliminating fraud and saving money". Only on Planet Moonbat!

     
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