Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Heisinberg. Show Heisinberg's posts

    Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    A real Independent party that people could go to when they realized that both parties are a pack of Liars ?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Heisinberg. Show Heisinberg's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    If only " Independents " had a party of their own instead of voting for the lesser of two evils .
     
  3. This post has been removed.

     
  4. This post has been removed.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from GerackObushma. Show GerackObushma's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    In Response to Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?:
    [QUOTE]A real Independent party that people could go to when they realized that both parties are a pack of Liars ?
    Posted by Heisinberg[/QUOTE]

    That party was the ORIGINAL Tea Party, before it was hijacked by the neo-fascist LIARS like Stepford Wife Sarah Palin and the rest of the establishment Republicrats.

    The ORIGINAL Tea Party was Anti War, Anti Big Government entitlement programs, pro small business, anti corporate fascism, pro feeedom.

    Both political crime families are totally against all of the above. as much as the sheep wish it weren't true, There's almost no difference between them.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Firewind. Show Firewind's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    In Response to Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Should there be a third party in U.S. politics? : That party was the ORIGINAL Tea Party, before it was hijacked by the neo-fascist LIARS like Stepford Wife Sarah Palin and the rest of the establishment Republicrats. The ORIGINAL Tea Party was Anti War, Anti Big Government entitlement programs, pro small business, anti corporate fascism, pro feeedom. Both political crime families are totally against all of the above. as much as the sheep wish it weren't true, There's almost no difference between them.
    Posted by GerackObushma[/QUOTE]

    Think:  Dick Armey.  That's all you need to know.  Before Murdoch&Ailes could find a leader, they constantly interviewed him about it.  You remember Dick Armey.  Of course you do.  The consummate Washington and republican party insider.  And they called it astroturf...
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Firewind. Show Firewind's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    In Response to Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?:
    [QUOTE]A real Independent party that people could go to when they realized that both parties are a pack of Liars ?
    Posted by Heisinberg[/QUOTE]

    Independent.  Another sham concept.  Republicans by another name.  They are inherently conservative -- at least what "conservative" used to mean.  People who look and look before they leap.  And they are looking for a reason to support, perhaps rejoin fellow conservatives: the republican party.  So Murdoch&Ailes continue to ask them their opinion, and make them important to the other media.  A prime example of their hammering at a point until it must be the truth (as they see it).  Too clever by half.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Firewind. Show Firewind's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    Now, as to the broader concept, yes, what a solution that would be.  I honestly agree that it's very attractive.  But you would also have to like the concept of a coalition government.  As one who might be the next to lead a third party would say:  How's that workin' for ya?  And for "independents" who think it would be a hoot: The closest we came to a third party in recent history - Mr. Perot's campaign - helped in a big way to de-elect Mr. Bush senior.  How'd that work out for ya?
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Heisinberg. Show Heisinberg's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    In Response to Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?:
    [QUOTE]Now, as to the broader concept, yes, what a solution that would be.  I honestly agree that it's very attractive.  But you would also have to like the concept of a coalition government.  As one who might be the next to lead a third party would say:  How's that workin' for ya?  And for "independents" who think it would be a hoot: The closest we came to a third party in recent history - Mr. Perot's campaign - helped in a big way to de-elect Mr. Bush senior.  How'd that work out for ya?
    Posted by Firewind[/QUOTE]
    That worked out quite well in fact , The Presidency of Bill Clinton was the best thing to happen to this country in a while. He stuck to the center even when the party tried to pull him to the left.
     
  10. This post has been removed.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from brat13. Show brat13's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    In Response to Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?:
    [QUOTE]If only " Independents " had a party of their own instead of voting for the lesser of two evils .
    Posted by Heisinberg[/QUOTE]
    There are dozens of "third parties". Libertarian, Green, Jefferson Republican, Labor etc.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Should there be a third party in U.S. politics?

    I am all for third parties...the more the merrier..first however, I think we should do away with party designation on the ballot..force people to actually think about what candidate they are voting for.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from AppDev. Show AppDev's posts

    No political party is independent

    Every political organization needs financial support to win elections, so there never has been nor will there ever be a political organization that is "independent" in anything more than name. The following describes some of the parties to left of center.

    In the first half of the twentieth century, there was an influential third party in U.S. politics: the Progressive Party, running three major candidates for President--Theodore Roosevelt, in 1912, Robert M. La Follette, Sr., in 1924, and Henry Wallace, in 1948. Before, after and in between those elections the party fragmented into state organizations. Like the Liberal label, the Progressive label meant different things at different times. For example, by 1918 all but one of the 1912-era Progressives elected to Congress had joined the Republican party.

    Progressive state organizations have since formed or revived. Vermont has several Progressive legislators and first elected U.S. Sen. Sanders to office as the Progressive mayor of Burlington, VT. Oregon has a small Progressive party but no officeholders. Wisconsin, which had the strongest party, elected Progressives to the offices of governor, U.S. senator, U.S. representative and state legislator but now has only memories. The Minnesota Progressives mostly joined the Democratic-Farmer-Labor coalition, although they revived to support Eugene McCarthy for President in 1968.

    The earlier Progressive parties flirted with Socialists and Communists, which cost support during the Cold War that followed World War II and was until recently a primary obstacle to revival. In the meantime, Green parties formed, trying to build out from environmental issues and winning some county and municipal offices. In 1991, the U.S. Green Party was organized, candidates have been elected to state legislatures in Arkansas, California and Maine, and nominees have run for President in each election since 1996.

    The so-called "Tea Party," a loosely organized progressive group, had its name hijacked by reactionaries with money to spend in 2009, but neither the original nor the hijackers generated a party organization so far. Three organizations using Tea Party as part of a name formed in New York, supporting two of the candidates in the 26th Congressional district special election of 2011; neither candidate won.

     

Share