Call of Duty

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from katenjake. Show katenjake's posts

    Call of Duty

    MY DS has been begging for the Call of Duty game for Wii. He is 11 and we have not yet allowed M rated games. He claims that "all" of his clasmates play and that he is being left out of the conversations at school. What age do you think is old enough for "M" video games? Am I being too strict?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    Hi Kate
    My son will be 11 in September and I will not let him have Call of Duty.  None of his friends have it, but I know some of his cousins his age in NY have the game.  

    I believe that stores won't sell it to anyone that's under 17. 

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from katenjake. Show katenjake's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I read online that there is an option where you can turn off the blood, gore and language. Does anyone know if that makes it more acceptable?
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I have no idea but the whole point of the game is killing someone with a gun.  I'm going to stick to Mario Kart and Pokemon.

    I think if your kid knows how to use his Wii that he will turn that option back on.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    In Response to Call of Duty:
    [QUOTE]What age do you think is old enough for "M" video games? Am I being too strict?
    Posted by katenjake[/QUOTE]

    Seventeen.

    In Response to Call of Duty:
    [QUOTE]Am I being too strict?
    Posted by katenjake[/QUOTE]

    No. You're his parent, not his 11-year-old buddy.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I agree 100%.  You are his parent.  Just because other parents are too permissive and are willing to cave to their children's INAPPROPRIATE whims, you shouldn't feel pressure to do the same.  You are doing the right thing.  

    He can live through disappointment.  Not only are you protecting his too young psyche, you are building strong character, teaching life lessons he'll carry with him for life.  Furthermore, your standing firmly in his corner for his good fosters his sense of being protected and loved.  Catering to a child's every whim does not give them this same sense.  

    I'm reminded of a story Dr. Phil told of his own teenage childhood in which he had a friend over and they asked to go to the high school basketball game in an ice storm.  "Everyone else" would be there.  Dr. Phil and Robin said, "NO WAY."  The two friends went up to his room, and his friend was looking out the window, tears streaming down his face.  Dr. Phil tried to tell him it wasn't that big a deal to miss the game, but his friend explained that he WISHED his parents loved him enough to say he couldn't drive somewhere when it wasn't safe.  They wouldn't have said no, and he knew it meant they didn't love him like his friend was loved by his parents, and it hurt enough to make a teenage guy CRY in front of his best friend.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    ha ha, I think he stole that story from an episode of Silver Spoons.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    That Dr. Phil story sounds extremely suspect to me, like it had been grossly exaggerated for television. I've never known any teenage boy, even those who did cry on occasion, to have tears streaming down his face. But I digress.

    Even if there is a way to tone down the violence, odds are your kid will be able to turn off the control. Kids are smarter than parents when it comes to that. The entire point of the game (and others like it) is to commit violent acts in very real-looking environments. It's not the fantasy violence of, for example, Smash Brothers (a Wii game with characters from various Nintendo games, with the purpose of beating up on each other). It appears real and that's just plain not appropriate for an 11-year-old. I find it disturbing when my friends in their 20s and 30s play those games and have to step away from the screen (and I have a pretty high violence tolerance).

    You're the parent and it's your money. When your child is old enough to earn money and buy the game on his own, legally, then he can choose what he wants. Until then, you make the rules.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I agree when he is 17 and has a job and can afford to buy the game then he gets the game.  Now stopping him from playhing the game at a friend's house is going to be a whole another ball game. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    Really?  LOL!!  Wherever it comes from, I think the message is true, though.  This one is real, I know for sure!  My grandmother was watching my very young (can't remember how old but definitely under 10) cousin, and he said, "Gramma, I LOVE it at YOUR house."  She asked why, and he responded (I kid you not, this is a direct quote), "Because you have rules."
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Prill. Show Prill's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I just can't believe people still watch Dr. Phil... that is more damaging to my psyche and ears than Call of Duty ever would be!

    But, to answer to original poster, your child, your choice. And unfortunately as a parent at times you have to make and implement decisions that may not be seen as "cool' to your kids, to echo Lemon, you're his parent, not his buddy. In my mind no age is appropriate for such violent games... you are either too young for the violence, or, if you are old enough for the violence, then you are probably too old to be playing video games!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    The other question that you should ask yourself is whether or not your son is already playing the game at other kids' houses.  You might have to talk to their parents about it too.  There's no way I would ever want my kid to play that game, 17 or not.  Those things should never be made.  
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Leila32. Show Leila32's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    RE: Call of Duty - I don't even like the fact that my husband plays it.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from hellgirl. Show hellgirl's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    M = 17. If you disable the blood, gore and language, he can turn it right back on. It's a player controlled option, not designed as a parental control. Some players just don't like it but enjoy the game.

    FTR: I prefer Battlefield Bad Company, with all options on, to Call of Duty. But I'm old. I would never buy it for, or allow, an 11 year-old to play it.

    Like my parents used to tell me when I used the, "BUT EVERYONE IS DOING IT!" argument as to why I should be allowed to as well: "If everyone jumped off a bridge, would you?"

    When I look back to then, and see where I am now compared to the kids with wicked permissive parents, I'm grateful. Very, very grateful.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    If you're even asking the question at all, then it probably won't matter what I say, but in my opinion, he is WAY too young for that.  My kids, one of whom is 10, are only allowed to play Mario, sports, and other similar games, and only for a short time, on weekends.  One says all his friends have cell phones, but he will not have one for a long time.  My 8 year old says all his friends watch iCarly, etc. and have a DS - oh well. They don't even ask anymore because they know where I stand.  

    He might not like it, but he can't be the ONLY one, and even if you feel mean, it is in his best interest. Tell him it doesn't matter what other people do; you are doing what you think is appropriate for your family.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    My mom used to say, "Because I'm the mean mom," when I asked why I couldn't do something other were allowed to do.  It was hard to argue with that, you know?  "Oh," was about all I could usually muster as a response.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    In Response to Re: Call of Duty:
    [QUOTE]RE: Call of Duty - I don't even like the fact that my husband plays it.
    Posted by Leila32[/QUOTE]
    ha ha husbands. Mine plays City of Zeroes. it must be a male thing because video games seem mind-numbingly boring to me. I would rather watch paint dry. Literally. I would sit and stare at wet paint.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    With my husband it's Assassin's Creed.  I can hear the slash of the scimitar in my head as I write this.  When I have to grade papers and I need my husband to leave me alone/not be distracting I tell him it's an Assassin's Creed Night. 

    Don't give into your kid. 
    For that matter, get him off MarioCart and send him outside. 
    Good luck!  There are lots of moments like this with teenagers.  Think of this as shoring up the dam of sandbags.  If you give in at 11 you'll just open the floodgates.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    OMG, Assassin's Creed is the worst. It makes my stomach churn whenever mine plays it and I can't be in the room either. :-( I actually think it's worse than Fallout or Call of Duty. Those make me uncomfortable, but Assassin's Creed makes me walk away.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    In Response to Re: Call of Duty:
    [QUOTE]OMG, Assassin's Creed is the worst . It makes my stomach churn whenever mine plays it and I can't be in the room either. :-( I actually think it's worse than Fallout or Call of Duty. Those make me uncomfortable, but Assassin's Creed makes me walk away.
    Posted by RedFishBlueFish[/QUOTE]

    I know.  It's so weird. My husband is such a mature, responsible, sensitive guy and then he reverts back to his acne-riddled, 15-year-old self and gets all giddy with his scimitar as soon as Assassin's Creed is on.  It's really unattractive but whatever.  The man witnessed me give birth and he still finds me attractive so I guess I can consider this a compromise.  WHen the time comes I won't be letting our kids play stuff like that in our house. 
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I feel like video games for males and technology/entertainment in general is unavoidable, so I think a lot about how to deal with it when it comes up. I think my husband actually sets a pretty good example (for our daughter -- not for you guys) because he works SO hard in his job, his label, and his bands, and then he uses the video game as a reward later when he unwinds. I think that's the trick -- the video game/tv/etc. comes after everything else is done and you're ready to pass out from exhaustion. It's not the way you spend your day or a cure for boredom or whatever. Just like you wouldn't eat ice cream for breakfast and lunch (even if you desperately want to).
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from dz76. Show dz76's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    Am I the only mom out there who (if I had the time) would be playing video games? :-) As I said there isn't time anymore for either of us to play but before kids DH and I would spend a rainy weekend together playing.

    That said, OP should stand strong and not give in.  No way does an 11 y/o need to play graphic violent games.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from CoffeeQueen. Show CoffeeQueen's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    I loathe the video games as well.  I started calling all the war games "Rainbow Duty" as a hybrid name so I wouldn't have to remember them all. LOL!

    True story, DH left his xbox controller on the coffee table and came up to bed.  The next morning when DS and I came downstairs I went to make his bottle and DS zeroed right in on that controller and dropped the thing right on the slate floor!  Broke the toggle thing and took a giant piece of plastic off. HA!  There haven't been ANY video games in my house for a month. :)

    To the OP, I know it's hard to say no to your kids especially when you feel like they are being left out.  A co-worker said something to me at Christmas time that always pops up in my mind when discussing material things and gift giving holidays.  She said, "one of the hardest things about being a parent is not spoiling the cr*p out of your kids by giving in to every 'want' and I gotta have'."  I so agree with this and I think that by sheilding your son as long as you can will be the best gift in the long run.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from hellgirl. Show hellgirl's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    dz76: I love Fallout, Oblivion, Assassin's Creed, Battlefield Bad Company II and Gears of War! It just so happens that I suck at playing them. So no, you're not the only mom out there who loves VGs. :D
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Call of Duty

    Just the other day I played MarioKart with my son.  I lost badly but he was enjoying showing me how to do things.  This was a treat during the week, no homework.  He never gets to play Wii/DS on weekdays.  So he was thrilled. 
     
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