Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from CT-DC. Show CT-DC's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG



    In Response to Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping

    [QUOTE]" I wish people weighing the daycare decision wouldn't use the phrase "other people raising my child" in reference to daycare providers. Trust me, we are our son's primary caregivers and we are definitely raising him. Our daycare teachers are partners in this work, and they work with us to instill the habits DH and I have decided are important (as any good daycare providers should). Sorry if I have offended, but that statement is a big pet peeve of mine."
    Posted by kiwigal[/QUOTE]


    As the director of a childcare center, I say 'hear, hear'!!!! to Kiwigal! 

    My staff and I do NOT want to take over raising your child.  I loved how Kiwigal said her childcare providers are "partners" - this is exactly what we strive to be!  I have a masters in early childhood education, so I know a great deal and hope that I can be helpful to parents as a resource, and of course I want to provide high quality childcare, but YOU are the PARENTS, and believe me, all children, from the youngest 3 month old to the oldest children at our center, know EXACTLY who their parents are (haven't you ever seen your very, very young baby wiggle and arch toward you and their eyes light up when you come for them?? even though they are in the arms of their most favorite childcare provider?  they TOTALLY know who you are!)

    (I have a pet peeve, could we get rid of the phrase daycare and say child care center?  Daycare has such a negative connotation, and we actually care for children...  but I digress)
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    Thanks, CT-DC, for a good point about child care instead of daycare. I will definitely change my language from here on out! 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SarahInActon. Show SarahInActon's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    Getting back to the original poster's woes over "handing your precious child over to someone else ..." I just wanted to comment that I felt EXACTLY the same way.  I too freaked out over the costs of rasing a child and ever learning to trust someone enough to take care of my little pricnce charming/monster-in-traning.

    BUT.  And a big BUT.  I found a wonderful in-home day care with an amazing woman who is now a big part of our family and I'm sure you will find one too.  I definately changed my mind and love that I have my son in full-time daycare (since the age of 10 weeks).  I freaked out at first but as each day went by, I saw how much care he was getting and the love he got to experience was multipled not divided.  And DS gets to play with tons of other kids, get his germ count up (thanks for that tidbit Kar!) and definately understands who Mum and Da-da are verusus the care-provider.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I'm a bit late to this thread, but it really is such a personal decision, and you can ask a ton of people and get a ton of answers.  You need to just sit down with your DH and figure out what would work best for YOU, and not worry about what others are doing.  Also, what Kiwi said is really true, it's not a lifetime decision, you can switch it up at any point if your situation changes or you aren't happy with your decision.

    I also want to join the chorus of those who object to the phrase "I dont want someone else raising my kids".  I just think that phrase is inherently judgemental.  No matter whether you are a SAHM, working mom, part time working mom, SAHD, you will always have others involved in raising your children.  You simply can't do it yourself and you need partners who are going to help you and expose your kids to things that you couldn't expose them to yourself.  Beyond that, if you feel that sending your kids to childcare means someone else is raising them, that that means there are a whole lot of people out there who aren't raising their kids...the dads who go to work, for instance, and pretty much everyone whose children are over the age of 5 and go to school.  If you "don't want someone else raising your kids", you should probably consider homeschooling them, as it should no doubt be just as important that you continue to raise your children after they are five as it is before they are five.  
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    MANYL -- I think the responses here are mostly about the emotional content of your post, but if you want actual practical solutions or examples of what other people have done, you may want to start a discussion asking for that.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from purplecow89. Show purplecow89's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    Parents used to have lots of people helping "raise their child" and expose them germs, except those people were grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins.  A lot of what child care outside the home does is replace the extended family that most people either don't have or live too far away from.  People are appalled that a parent might get a sleep trainer or a potty trainer in for a couple of days, as if they are hiring out their parenting because they can't be bothered.  Well, that trainer used to be grandma staying over for a couple of days to tag team the child care and housework while Mom is chasing a diaperless toddler around.  Society and economics have just changed who those other pair of hands belong to.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    One comment about the financial issues:  child care is a "5-year issue."  Many people end up cutting back or stopping altogether on savings and retirement for the 5 years (or more if you have more than one of different ages) until baby goes to school and then start up again afterwards.  Also, once your child reaches 15 months(?), costs of child care at a center start going down b/c the teacher:child ratio drops.  I think the cost goes down again at close to 3 years b/c the ratios drop again.  So, yes, you take a major hit initially with the finances, but as your child care costs drop, you can start adding the "extra" money back in to your retirement or savings accounts or, if those aren't an issue, start some kind of college savings for the baby.

    Purple cow--very well said.  Thank you for pointing that out.  My mother cares for our twins 4 days a week and I couldn't ask for a better arrangement.  It's a bit of a strange dynamic b/c my mother is following my lead/my instructions/my preferences for caring for them, but she's also giving me advice based on her experiences raising me and my siblings.  It really is a partnership and I know that regardless of everything else, she loves them as only a grandmother can.  We're very fortunate that she lives so close to us.  I know that if she didn't, it would have been a bit harder initially to hand my kids to someone else, but I also know that once I got to know that person/people, that I would consider them a partner in caring for my kids rather than someone else raising them for me.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I've been thinking about this post for a couple of days... Everyone is in a different situation and if you think you can't handle a child financially, I am positive you can find someone who is worse off who makes it work.  It IS possible. 

    I figured out last year that if we purchased a house, we definitely couldn't afford to pay for child care.  We love our apartment and it was more important to us to have a child, so no house for us.  I'm sure there are people who can't imagine getting pregnant while in an apartment, but I have no doubt it will work wonderfully for us.

    A friend of mine lives in a tiny two room apartment (yes, two rooms) with a husband who has not worked by choice for over 2 years (though he has savings)... And they decided to get pregnant.  They'll be fine, somehow.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    That's true, but everyone's idea of "fine" is different.  Kids are stresses on time, energy, and finances even in the most wonderful and capable of families.  Who is to say that the stresses of child rearing aren't too much for a couple for innumerable reasons who is wrestling with whether they should have kids or not?
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    In Response to Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG:
    [QUOTE]I've been thinking about this post for a couple of days... Everyone is in a different situation and if you think you can't handle a child financially, I am positive you can find someone who is worse off who makes it work.  It IS possible.  I figured out last year that if we purchased a house, we definitely couldn't afford to pay for child care.  We love our apartment and it was more important to us to have a child, so no house for us.  I'm sure there are people who can't imagine getting pregnant while in an apartment, but I have no doubt it will work wonderfully for us. A friend of mine lives in a tiny two room apartment (yes, two rooms) with a husband who has not worked by choice for over 2 years (though he has savings)... And they decided to get pregnant.  They'll be fine, somehow.
    Posted by framerican51008[/QUOTE]

    Have you seen Apartment Therapy? The dude who runs it lives in a 265-square-ft apartment in Manhattan with his wife and toddler. They seem way too happy.

    (their nursery site is incredibly addictive too)
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from KMD719. Show KMD719's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    In Response to Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG:
    [QUOTE]Amy-lynn - Only the grandfather drives and he is 73 and that is what was presented to me as part of the offer.  My DH thinks I should do it, meaning do the drop off/pick up.  Ya right....easy for him since he wouldn't be the one commuting.  He is poco loco LOL
    Posted by MANYL[/QUOTE]

    I'm a fairly young (61) grandmother 5 little ones.   Love them all and Grandpa and I offer to have kids visit on weekends etc as needed.   We have been caring for the youngest now 2 1/2 one day a week.    This is truly a gift to spend so much quality time with a grandchild.   However, I can say from experience that it can be very demanding to be "on" for 8 hrs a day.     We play on the floor, read, do playdoh and magic marker time, Thomas the trains all over our house, trips to the playground, long walks in the carriage, pool time in the summer, story hour at the library, visits to the store etc.   Getting a young one in & out of a car seat etc is physical.    What I'm saying is - you may wish to wait till your precious little one arrives and see how the grandparents can handle his/her care for a few hours before over extending their abilities.   They do grow VERY fast the first two years - then their needs change and they need the social interaction and day care can play a valuable role.  

    If the grandparents to be you speak of are really physcial - ride bikes, ski etc. then go for it.    

    I have so much respect for the young families who have to juggle it all - I don't know how they do it.   Whatever you decide, congratulations and just love the little one everyday as much as you can.     
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from KEK. Show KEK's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I want to add my perspective to the "childcare is a 5 year committment".  My daughter is 15.  She was in full time childcare from the time she was 4 months until she finished kindergarten.  You would think the expenses would lessen after that point but in my experience they did not.  First off, I decided to enroll her in Catholic school.  Although the cost isn't anywhere near that of childcare ($4500-5000 annual) there are many other costs to consider.  Most schools run from 8:30 - 2:30.  If you work full time you will also be paying before/after school care (At least $500/month for 9 months = $4500). The real costs hit you when it comes to the summer months.  Most full time daycamps are about 400/week, so 10 summer weeks = $4000.  And don't forget about February/Christmas/April vacations and all those early release days. 
    I'm not trying to discourage anyone. I just want you to know that the costs will not disappear when your child turns 5. 

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from GC1016. Show GC1016's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I've kind off stayed away from this thread as it's one of those strongly-held conviction topics that tend to devolve into Ugly, but:

    The thought of having a child and paying for daycare (which is the tip of the iceberg) is completely overwhelming.  Money and what you can afford definitely plays into it.  I would say, though, that if you can't quite get beyond the dollars and cents and sticker-shock, then it's probably not the time to have kids.  If that statement feels like a punch in the gut, then the money is the lesser concern and you'll make it work.  

    To the OP: you may find that daycare isn't an all-or-nothing solution.  When I go back, I've got a patchwork quilt of family & in-home daycare put together, and I'm able to work from home a couple of days a week, so that should carry us through for a while.  So in the great child care v. stay-at-home v. relatives helping, the answer may be: Yes.  All of the Above.  

    And for what it's worth: I think teachers are incredibly driven, and Kiwigal -- thanks for spending your days away from your own muffin and teaching ours.  
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    This is somewhat off topic, but it ties into what GC1016 just said about teachers, and the whole childcare situation. This morning my DH commented that even when it is a rough day, our childcare provider and her assistant seem to genuinely like their jobs. I do think it takes a special kind of person to care for so many children all day long, and I'm glad we found people who do. So a big Thank You to all the teachers (especially early childhood educators) out there!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from mbg109. Show mbg109's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    GC, I feel like you took what I wrote as an insult... Now, rereading it I can understand that I didn't explain myself well enough (and that apparently, the natural inclination is to jump to thinking that someone is insulting instead of simply sharing on these boards when one disagrees). 

    I did not in any way mean to say that teachers are not driven.  My comment about my DH and I being driven was meant to articulate that we work long hours-- first ones in the office and last ones out, etc.  (I was attempting to add context to why I feel the way I do.)   I respect teachers a great deal.  In fact, I teach night classes to high school students in my community, and uniquely understanding how challenging a job it is-- and appreciate even more those who choose to teach as a full-time profession. 

    I always thought that the purpose of these boards was to offer differing perspective to help one another out... but time after time that seems to be the case only if you agree with the overall philosophy of the majority of posters.  I don't apologize for offering a different opinion, but realize that this is likely not the venue to do so.  I did, however, want to clarify my previous post-- I don't like my statements to be unclear or otherwise wrongly interpreted.  Thanks!
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I think we are just having a discussion, mbg. Trust me, when you're attacked you'll know it. It's hard to miss.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Kiwiguy. Show Kiwiguy's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    Since this thread has veered somewhat off course already, I want to throw my two cents out there.

    For context: I am a father (the other half of the parenting equation), I am fortunate enough to be self employed and so I set my work conditions (including work location and hours), and before we had our son I had no idea how we could possibly make things work financially.

    But here is the big revelation - to me at least. Once our son was born EVERYTHING changed. My wife and I had talked about so much before he was born - we are great talkers. Childcare, values, child raising philosophies, finances, parental obligations, extended family obligations and visits (none of our families live near by), etc.

    So, we are in hospital, the little guy makes his entrance, his beaming daddy defies all odds by not passing out at the sight of it all and even has the courage to cut the umbilical cord. At that very moment EVERYTHING changed in my life. Seriously.

    A older friend (and mother) had told me that once the baby is born a whole new part of your heart opens up that you never realized was even there. You will feel this incredible love for your child that will surprise and amaze you. I nodded, thinking it was the usual kind of sappy stuff you hear, but she really was right - in my case at least.

    Now here is how everything changed - everything in my life revolves around my son. That is not to say I'm a helicopter parent, or that I can't let him be with others, but what it does mean is that his needs and his well being come before mine. As a baby, if he woke during the night I'd tend to him. I caught up on sleep later. I was working very long hours on a project that had continual deadlines that I could not change, so I found ways to make that work. I used to travel frequently to project sites or to meet with clients, etc. I changed that, suggesting we meet online and found other ways that allowed me minimize time away from Boston.

    After my wife went back to work when our son was three months old, I took over looking after him all day while she was at work. I'd work when he slept and I'd make up the rest of the hours late at night and on weekends. My clients got used to getting e-mails sent from me at 1am, 2am, a follow up at 3am.

    But he soon got to a point where he was sleeping less and I could not get the work done so we needed to get help. We have no family within hours of Boston, so we found an older lady to come and care for him at our place 2 or 3 days a week. This allowed me to get all the work done I needed (still working at night and weekends to keep up). After some time with this, we found our little guy needed to be socializing and developing with other kids his age so we set him up with an outside child care group. I'm still not sure how we afford it all.

    The very roundabout point I am making here is that we could never have mapped this out before having our son. In my experience, having a baby is such a constantly fluid situation and you are constantly changing and adapting to your childs needs as they arise. Ask any mum - the daily routine might be similar each day, but it is never the same. As a case in point - my wife always thought she would breastfeed for the first year. But the little guy just couldn't latch on, so she had to react to that by pumping and feeding him breastmilk via bottle for his first year. Finances in relation to having a baby are no different. I never thought we could afford extended childcare yet we make it work. We have sacrificed some things and adjusted others, but it all comes under the old saying "where there's a will, there's a way".

    And I know that my wife and I are not unique. This is one of the amazing things about having a child. No matter how rich or poor you are, I think most every parent has the same feelings. Yet these feelings are so very hard to understand and appreciate until you actually have them yourself as a parent. I can assure you that any parent reading this post will nod their head and say, yup we had to make those sorts of adjustments and sacrifices too. Maybe it was in relation to finances, maybe it was in relation to the desire (or lack thereof) to have extended family help with child care, maybe it was about other activities in their lives, such as socializing with friends, work, vacations, etc.

    So my advice to the original poster is to take in the thoughts everyone is giving in terms of their personal experiences. Prepare yourself financially and emotionally and in any other way for parenting or more specifically childcare. But more importantly, accept that the whole baby gig is very fluid. Don't be afraid to re-evaluate your "pre-baby" ideas, thoughts, values and decisions. As someone else said, nothing is set in stone. Do what works for you and the baby at the time. Take it one day at a time and constantly reevaluate how things are going. That revaluation and adjustment is how you best provide for your child.

    I'm now stepping down off the soap box and crawling back under my rock ...
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from LLTyrrell. Show LLTyrrell's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    In Response to Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG:
    [QUOTE]Since this thread has veered somewhat off course already, I want to throw my two cents out there. For context: I am a father (the other half of the parenting equation), I am fortunate enough to be self employed and so I set my work conditions (including work location and hours), and before we had our son I had no idea how we could possibly make things work financially. But here is the big revelation - to me at least. Once our son was born EVERYTHING changed. My wife and I had talked about so much before he was born - we are great talkers. Childcare, values, child raising philosophies, finances, parental obligations, extended family obligations and visits (none of our families live near by), etc. So, we are in hospital, the little guy makes his entrance, his beaming daddy defies all odds by not passing out at the sight of it all and even has the courage to cut the umbilical cord. At that very moment EVERYTHING changed in my life. Seriously. A older friend (and mother) had told me that once the baby is born a whole new part of your heart opens up that you never realized was even there. You will feel this incredible love for your child that will surprise and amaze you. I nodded, thinking it was the usual kind of sappy stuff you hear, but she really was right - in my case at least. Now here is how everything changed - everything in my life revolves around my son. That is not to say I'm a helicopter parent, or that I can't let him be with others, but what it does mean is that his needs and his well being come before mine. As a baby, if he woke during the night I'd tend to him. I caught up on sleep later. I was working very long hours on a project that had continual deadlines that I could not change, so I found ways to make that work. I used to travel frequently to project sites or to meet with clients, etc. I changed that, suggesting we meet online and found other ways that allowed me minimize time away from Boston. After my wife went back to work when our son was three months old, I took over looking after him all day while she was at work. I'd work when he slept and I'd make up the rest of the hours late at night and on weekends. My clients got used to getting e-mails sent from me at 1am, 2am, a follow up at 3am. But he soon got to a point where he was sleeping less and I could not get the work done so we needed to get help. We have no family within hours of Boston, so we found an older lady to come and care for him at our place 2 or 3 days a week. This allowed me to get all the work done I needed (still working at night and weekends to keep up). After some time with this, we found our little guy needed to be socializing and developing with other kids his age so we set him up with an outside child care group. I'm still not sure how we afford it all. The very roundabout point I am making here is that we could never have mapped this out before having our son. In my experience, having a baby is such a constantly fluid situation and you are constantly changing and adapting to your childs needs as they arise. Ask any mum - the daily routine might be similar each day, but it is never the same. As a case in point - my wife always thought she would breastfeed for the first year. But the little guy just couldn't latch on, so she had to react to that by pumping and feeding him breastmilk via bottle for his first year. Finances in relation to having a baby are no different. I never thought we could afford extended childcare yet we make it work. We have sacrificed some things and adjusted others, but it all comes under the old saying "where there's a will, there's a way". And I know that my wife and I are not unique. This is one of the amazing things about having a child. No matter how rich or poor you are, I think most every parent has the same feelings. Yet these feelings are so very hard to understand and appreciate until you actually have them yourself as a parent. I can assure you that any parent reading this post will nod their head and say, yup we had to make those sorts of adjustments and sacrifices too. Maybe it was in relation to finances, maybe it was in relation to the desire (or lack thereof) to have extended family help with child care, maybe it was about other activities in their lives, such as socializing with friends, work, vacations, etc. So my advice to the original poster is to take in the thoughts everyone is giving in terms of their personal experiences. Prepare yourself financially and emotionally and in any other way for parenting or more specifically childcare. But more importantly, accept that the whole baby gig is very fluid. Don't be afraid to re-evaluate your "pre-baby" ideas, thoughts, values and decisions. As someone else said, nothing is set in stone. Do what works for you and the baby at the time. Take it one day at a time and constantly reevaluate how things are going. That revaluation and adjustment is how you best provide for your child. I'm now stepping down off the soap box and crawling back under my rock ...
    Posted by Kiwiguy[/QUOTE]



    Well said! You have helped me regain my calm after reading all these other posts that made me question what I'd gotten myself into! lol.
     
    When I first got pregnant I was so caught up trying to plan everything. I got the basics down, I have daycare figured out (as I'm the main provider for our family I have no choice but to return to work). My DH has figured out how to change his schedule to spend more time at home so that our DD will only have to be at an in home daycare for 4 days a week.

    Once I had a basic plan in place I had to take a step back and realize that for the rest of my life I'm going to be juggling my child's needs along with the rest of the needs of the family. I can't plan everything and have to be ready to go by the seat of my pants.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I'm a big planner too. In some ways it comes in handy, because you have so many irons on the fire once you have a kid. But since babies are agents of chaos, you also have to be flexible. My husband always tells me, "just go with the flow." But man, there have been some heavy flow days this past year.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from monicat415. Show monicat415's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I just wanted to chime in on the fluidity theme- my DS is 17 months, and I've been back at work since he was 12 weeks.

    The first 4 months back at work were finishing a temporary assignment in D.C., so we didn't have family close by; my mother flew down for the first week, which helped with the emotional transition, then we switched to in-home care full time.
    After that, we moved back to Boston, and went through one month of 1 or 2 days a week at an in-home care provider and the other 3 or 4 days split (dynamically) between a friend, my sister, and myself and my DH.
    Then my mother was in the picture, so Mondays at our in-home provider's, and the other 4 days at our house with grandma for a month.
    Since then we're typically at Fridays with auntie, 1 week a month with grandma, occasional unexpected days with grandpa (who is an airline pilot, and irregularly ends up in Boston for a day) and the rest of the time at our care provider's.
    Sounds pretty crazy, huh? But it works, and my DS LOVES all of the different people that he gets to spend time with. We came back from a 1 week trip, where all of his time was spent with mommy, and he just lit up when he realized that he was on the way to 'play with his friends' on Monday morning!
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    I don't normally post here but do lurk occasionally. Your message header caught my eye.  I am much older and have a grown daughter, but I can assure you of this, if you are going to wait until you can afford to have a baby, then you will never have one.  Your decision to be a SAHM or a working mother is a very personal one.  I have done both and both are equally hard. I elected to be a SAHM after my daughter was born but life happens, my husband got sick,  and I had to put my daughter in daycare while I worked full time. Never stopped and she is a beautiful well adjusted adult.  My only advice is to see how you feel when the baby comes.  You have options which is good.  Can you afford to stay home for say 6 months and give being a SAHM a whirl?  Daycare is crazy expensive today and I feel for you on that.    Part time work is a good option too as it allows your husband to spend time with the baby, gets you out of the house for a few hours and you don't have to pay anyone.  But if full time is what you want or need to do, then just be real picky (obviously) about the daycare and do surprise visits during the day.  Sorry for the long post, brought back some memories Cool
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Celia2. Show Celia2's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    MANYL - I agree with kiwigal, your daycare decision doesn't have to be set in stone. I was SAHM for 1st 18 mos of DS life but by the time he was 1 yrs old I was ready to go back to work. I chose a small family daycare. He absolutely loved going there because he had other kids to play with. When it came time for preschool I was able to switch my hours so that he went to preschool in the AM and I was home in the PM. I've kept this schedule since he entered school. It has worked out well for us.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: Child care -vs - stay at home -vs- relatives helping OMG

    Nice networking!

    Signed, 
    another CPA

    Glad that you have this class as many parents don't know enough about these topics.  
     

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