Kindergarten in Somerville

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    KEK--I had a December birthday in a district with an October 31 cutoff, but the same thing happened to me with reading.  I was reading Little House on the Prairie-level books while my classmates were still learning phonics.  My mother was given the option to have me skip kindergarten, but she chose not to for whatever reason--she claims I said I didn't want to, but there must have been more to it than that.  So, I went to 1st grade for reading when I was in kindergarten and 2nd grade for reading when I was in 1st grade.  And when I didn't want to do that anymore (couldn't tell you why), I was given special "enrichment" projects to do on my own in the school library.  But, as with you, the other kids DID catch up.  I was still older than most of the kids in my class and that probably worked to my benefit in the upper grades. 

    I will say, though, when I got to college, it was no fun being the first of my friends to turn 21 ;)


     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    If kids "catch up" doesn't that mean they started off behind?  Each child falls at a different point on the maturity bell curve for their age, but are we debating the fact that an increase in age pushes the bell curve of emotional, physiological, and psychological development to the right, as well?
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    Kar, I think she meant that the kids "caught up" with her reading.  I've read many times that no matter how early your child begins to read, that most other kids will eventually get to the same level.  I've been noticing that with my own 4th grade son, who has been an avid reader since he was four; most of his classmates are now able to read similar level books, whereas even a year ago many of them weren't even close. (He still has the benefit of having dozens of great novels under his belt, but the reading ability has technically evened out.) 

    I've also heard from other parents and teachers that starting kindergarten on the younger side is more of an issue in the older grades - sometimes academically, but more importantly, socially.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    Ah, reading.  That makes more sense than their knowing if their classmates who had started kindergarten at age 4 were on par with them emotionally, physiologically, and psychologically in high school.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    Yes, my "advanced" academic status in kindergarten dwindled to "slightly above average" by the time I was in high school :)  So, maybe it's not so much that my classmates "caught up," as it is that the bell curve got much broader over time.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ajuly09. Show ajuly09's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    There are some very good points on here! I teach kindergarten and was not going to chime in because of my strong opinions on this!  Every child IS different, some kids really are ready for K earlier than others.  But a child does need to be ready socially and academically.  The only children I have held back have been A. Boys and B. Summer birthdays.  From my experience, even if academically (knowledge base was strong) they were ready, their management skills i.e. following 3 step directions, staying on task, solving problems, was lower than others.  The main reason I have kept a child back was for social/emotional/organizational reasons.  Just my $.02.    And I also love Michelle's point about children catching up, they do! But the LOVE for reading and learning needs to be fostered at an early age!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemoncoke. Show lemoncoke's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    Concerning Waldorf and Montessori schools, the Montessori classes are called 3 yr old, 4 yr old and 5 year old classes - and 5 is the Kindergarten class.  Most Montessori schools have all three ages in one class.  They believe that that gives children a chance to be in the oldest, youngest and middle cohorts, and that to be in all three are important for emotional development. 

    Dad may be  able to get a kid into the Montessori 5 yr old class early, but maybe not.  And most school systems will insist that the kid repeat K anyway. BTW, Montessori elementary classes are like this as well - Gr 1-3 are in the same class, 4 - 6, 7 -9, etc.

    Waldorf/Steiner schools actually prefer that first graders be about 7, and will keep children back in K if they don't feel the child is ready.  They believe reading readiness is indicated by the change of teeth.  Waldorf Kindergartens do not teach "reading readiness, letters or numbers."  Children spend more time outside, playing, cooking, setting the tables, etc. training their bodies rather than their minds.  IMHO, this guy needs to find the kid a good preschool where play is more important than reading readiness, so that the child can develop emotionally and physically and go to school with his own cohort.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    The OP didn't say anything about reading -- that evolved through replies to his post.

    I thought that Montessori had them shining shoes and polishing silver, and Waldorf was about chasing fairies and playing make believe.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from CT-DC. Show CT-DC's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    I thought that Montessori had them shining shoes and polishing silver, and Waldorf was about chasing fairies and playing make believe.

    Oh, I do hope you're being funny, Lemon!  Although, you have about hit the nail on the head in some ways: Montessori is about doing real work and little emphasis is on make believe, pretend play, etc.  Waldorf is about developing a child's other skills, including creativity, in addition to reading.  And Montessori definitely will do skill work re: letter recognition, phonics, etc. before Waldorf would!

    I am an early childhood educator and a child who went to kindergarten when she was 43/4 yrs, turning 5 about 8 days before the 12/31 cutoff.  I was very smart, learned to read quickly, was above average in school, always in the top of the top, went to a very competitive school, blah blah.  AND I was the youngest (and shortest) in my class and really SHOULD have been a senior in hs when I was a freshman in college.  (sorry, nowadays you say "first year").  Developmentally from a social/emotional perspective, I was younger and less socially skilled and if I had to do it again (and my mother agrees with me now) I'd have held me out.  AND add that to the tendency to redshirt kids now so that those who could go who are 5 yrs and 3 weeks get held out so they are 6 yrs old entering kindergarten, and your 4 yr old will be MUCH younger.  

    You want to look for a preschool where the emphasis is on developing socially, emotionally, phsyically, as well as cognitively.

    NOW, the one argument is some children who are very bright, learning/have learned to read, can be bored in kindergarten when they are about to be 6 yrs old and reading, while others aren't yet reading.  BUT a good teacher will be able to challenge children at both ends of the spectrum (because just because your child is smart doesn't mean he would be reading early, and just because your child is the oldest in class doesn't mean she'll be reading in kindergarten, either.

    So have him go to preschool one more year and be in school with his age and development-mates.  He'll have a wonderful kindergarten year and you won't be in a position to have to decide whether you want to "hold him back" in kindergarten!

    And sometimes, some school districts might allow "testing out" if a child turned 5 yrs old Sept 4th (vs Sept 1) but not if a child won't be 5 yrs old for 3 more months AFTER the cutoff date.

    Personally, I believe the cutoff date should be Sept 1 or Sept 30, I believe children who are 4 yrs 9 months (Dec birthdays) are still developmentally too young for kindergarten and then first grade the next year. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from KAM2007. Show KAM2007's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    I don't think you can get a better situation than having a 5.5 year old entering kindergarten! It's right in the middle of the age, not the oldest/youngest.

    DS is a december baby, at first (when pregnant) I was "bummed" at the extra year of preschool/day care costs, but now I'm pleased to have him in this situation. In Sept he will be 2.9 years and ready for preschool, Kindergarten he will be right in the middle of the age and right on track. And trust me, I fully believe DS is of above average intelligence and emotionally developed-I think it's in a parent's DNA to feel this way about their own child. But I see no need to rush him to grow up faster and will follow the guidelines when enrolling DS.

    Finding an enriching preschool or pre-K program is your best bet.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from skatingjerry. Show skatingjerry's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    I have been a preschool special education teacher for a long time, and in fact, I now work at the Capuano School.  My advice:  Don't push to get your child in kindergarten early.  What will "testing" show?  Social/emotional skills (which can't be measured by a test) are one of the biggest factors in school success.  What's the rush?  Enroll your child where he belongs, in preschool.  Give him that year to mature socially, so he'll be comfortable in a school setting.  Kindergartens are quite rigorous in Somerville, way too much for a 4 year old no matter how gifted or bright.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Kindergarten in Somerville

    thanks, skatingjerry. Now can you get the OP's kid into the Cap school?
     

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