My beef with summer camps

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from calitobostonjen. Show calitobostonjen's posts

    My beef with summer camps

    My son attends private school and like a lot of moms dealing with what to do with their child for the summer, it is exacerbated by the fact that they get out June 8th!!!!

    Most programs don't begin until the 27th of June when most schools are let out by then but I've got a rising 9th grader.  Do people really leave their child home alone for 2 1/2 weeks?  I feel like in general, society still has this idea that we are all stay at home moms and haven't adjusted school activities and events to address the fact that it is quite the opposite!  (Well, I live Milton and it may not be true there for the most part) but still...shouldn't we start a revolution or something? There are several parenting issues to be addressed:

    1.  Teenagers and starting high school at 7 am.  We already know that puberty is affecting half of their brain and the other half is asleep that early.  Algebra at 8am hasn't worked for some people for years.  Get off the agrarian schedule!

    2.  Late starting camps (my main issue for now)

    3.  No strollers on the T.  I don't have little ones right now, but this one's outrageous.

    The list could go on...sorry for the rant. 

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from keane5050. Show keane5050's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    It definitely depends on the child, but I would have no problem leaving a rising 9th grader home for 2 weeks.  That would make him about 14, right?  He would probably sleep half the morning anyway! 

    I left my daughter home alone at about 13. Not for the whole summer, but for the non-camp weeks.  I do have close neighbors who would be around in case of an emergency.  

    He could use those 2 1/2 weeks to get a jump on his summer reading. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    If most schools (public schools) let out at the end of June, then the camps aren't really starting late. They're starting on time for most kids, unless you think only private school kids should be allowed to attend.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    My son goes to Catholic school and he doesn't get out until the 22nd.   His Summer Camp starts July 5th, so for a week and a half I or someone will watch him.  I save some vacation days for the time he doesn't have school.  If he were a rising 9th grader I would leave him alone, but he's 10.5 and starting 5th grade in the Fall so that's not an option for me.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    RE: High school starting times. You do realize that this is a constraint of the needing to bus students, right? The HS kids get picked up early, so that the same buses can be used for the middle and elementary school students later. Unless you think it would be better to have them all together on the busses?

    I also agree with the others who say that camps are starting "on time" if most of the campers don't get out of school until then. That's the rub with attending private schools. I am sure your son's school calendar was made perfectly clear to you when you visited and went through the application process.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from calitobostonjen. Show calitobostonjen's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    Ok...so I didn't realize it was about the buses and I guess leaving him alone isn't too far fetched.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    For what it's worth, when I was that age, if I were left home for more than a couple of hours, my mother would make a LONG, DETAILED list of all the things she wanted me to do that day.  It included housework and yardwork and I was often at least partially responsible for my younger siblings (who also had "lists" to complete while at home) as well.  I hated it, but it kept us out of trouble since not making a huge dent in the list would ensure an even longer list the next day.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    I think when I was a rising 9th grader that I babysat for a few weeks in the summer.  Not for babies, but for elementary school kids.
    So I think he should be okay -- but I really like the list of chores idea!  My experience when I was that age is that I actually got really bored and agitated if there was more than a week of nothing to do.  A list of chores might have helped.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from calitobostonjen. Show calitobostonjen's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    In Response to Re: My beef with summer camps:
    For what it's worth, when I was that age, if I were left home for more than a couple of hours, my mother would make a LONG, DETAILED list of all the things she wanted me to do that day.  It included housework and yardwork and I was often at least partially responsible for my younger siblings (who also had "lists" to complete while at home) as well.  I hated it, but it kept us out of trouble since not making a huge dent in the list would ensure an even longer list the next day.
    Posted by Daisy75


    Yes!  My mom did that too and we usually do that for half days or a few days during spring break.  So we will probably continue.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    In Response to Re: My beef with summer camps:
    RE: High school starting times. You do realize that this is a constraint of the needing to bus students, right? The HS kids get picked up early, so that the same buses can be used for the middle and elementary school students later. Unless you think it would be better to have them all together on the busses?
    Posted by kiwigal

    Or the times could be flipped, with younger kids starting earlier and teens starting later, since little kids wake up earlier anyway and teens perform better with more morning sleep.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/09/AR2006010901561.html
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    That would be logical, lemon, but then you run into problems with after-school sports.

    BTW, I am not saying I agree with HS starting at 7:00am (when I did my student teaching, I had to be at school by 6:45, and ate fisrt lunch at 10:35am...). BUT, there's a reason for it that is not connected to the "agrarian schedule" mentioned by the OP.

    DH grew up in NZ which has lots of agriculture and all schools there start at 8:00am. They can do that because they don't bus. Everyone walks or rides bikes.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    In Response to Re: My beef with summer camps:
    For what it's worth, when I was that age, if I were left home for more than a couple of hours, my mother would make a LONG, DETAILED list of all the things she wanted me to do that day.  It included housework and yardwork and I was often at least partially responsible for my younger siblings (who also had "lists" to complete while at home) as well.  I hated it, but it kept us out of trouble since not making a huge dent in the list would ensure an even longer list the next day.
    Posted by Daisy75

    It wasn't just MY mom that did that?  LOL!  

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    I think all the moms must have been conspiring about how to make us miserable when we were teenagers.  Moms are so sneaky. ;)
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from IPWBride. Show IPWBride's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    I saw your other post that he is interested in babysitting, so that may be on his agenda now... but just another option, I dog-walked after school.  For some reason my mom wasn't into me babysitting, and I wasn't that excited about it either.  But I loved dogs so much and convinced her that I could be responsible and do this.  I probably started when I was in 8th or 9th grade.  I grew up in the city so this was a very good business opportunity for me with hardly any travel (found tons of dogs all in the same condo building).  Not sure if that is an option in your neighborhood.

    Now that I look back... people must've really trusted me.  I had keys to tons of units at such a young age! 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from cwagner13. Show cwagner13's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    Re high school times... here in the school district I live in (in texas), the times are reversed from the schedule that I had as a kid:

    elementary 7:45-2:45
    middle school 8:20-3:30
    high school 9:05-4:05

    and I have seen some sports teams practice before school instead of after school for middle school and high school.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    I think the agrarian school schedule thing was actually about the calendar year and not start times -- something about kids going to school when they weren't needed on the farm. But I think that ended with the industrial revolution. It's definitely not in play now -- it wouldn't make much sense to have them in school in the summer and early fall (harvest) or early spring (planting). I could be confused about the whole thing, though.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    In Response to Re: My beef with summer camps:
    Re high school times... here in the school district I live in (in texas), the times are reversed from the schedule that I had as a kid: elementary 7:45-2:45 middle school 8:20-3:30 high school 9:05-4:05 and I have seen some sports teams practice before school instead of after school for middle school and high school.
    Posted by cwagner13


    DH and I are house hunting and this is actually something I should look into for the towns we're looking at.  I wouldn't have thought of it before this thread, so thanks!  I love the schedule cwagner posted above.  I think it makes a lot of sense.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    As a teacher, I must chime in.  I love my summers with my daughter, but the best thing for teaching would be to stop having summer vacation.  If we had a week off after each quarter but then went to school year-round we'd have a LOT more teaching time with the kids and they wouldn't lose as much learning over the summer. Plus, it would really help out parents, especially the parents of younger kids, with childcare fees and all that. 

    I think in the next 15 years we'll see a shift to this.  Most people agree it's the best thing for the kids.  The only issue is there's not enough money to pay teachers for all those extra weeks of teaching.  The year-long education model will happen, it will just take more time than it should.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    In Response to Re: My beef with summer camps:
    I think the agrarian school schedule thing was actually about the calendar year and not start times -- something about kids going to school when they weren't needed on the farm. But I think that ended with the industrial revolution. It's definitely not in play now -- it wouldn't make much sense to have them in school in the summer and early fall (harvest) or early spring (planting). I could be confused about the whole thing, though.
    Posted by lemonmelon

    You are not confused..you hit it right on the head. The problem is we don't live in an agrarian society any longer. Anyone else besides me wondering why the education system hasn't caught up with that yet? Most other industrialized nations go to school year round with a week off here and there..but not the US...makes no sense to me. A year round schedule would work better for families..but I guess not so well for teachers.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    To JJhayle..you know your child better than anyone..but agewise your child is more than old enough to stay home alone. If you don't want him having a lot of free time...help him set up some volunteer opportunities.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    No, I meant that I don't think we're on the agrarian calendar any more -- or at least we've strayed far enough from it for it to be almost unrecognizable as such. Because kids are in school through the planting season and then back during harvest. I have some memory that school stopped being tied to the agrarian schedule in the 1800s. And I think that the summers off thing was supposed to be for mental and physical health, but I could just have gotten that impression from Anne of Green Gables. 

    I think a year-round schedule would probably be the same for a lot of teachers -- many of the ones I've known work second jobs or summer school through those months anyway.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    Okay, I was partly right:

    http://www.slate.com/id/2170230/
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    Our nieces and nephews in New Zealand and Australia have what is closer to a year-round schedule. They get 4 weeks break around Christmas (which is their summer, keep in mind) and then 2-3 2 week breaks between terms. I am a teacher, too, and I'd love to be on a schedule similar to this one.

    Now, there are some places that are definitely still on an agrarian calendar. One of my good friends from college grew up in Northern ME on the Canadian border. They started school in early August so that they could take three weeks off in the fall to work the potato harvest. It was that big a deal and everyone pitched in.

    A couple of  questions about districts who have moved sports before school or have later start times, if someone can answer...1) if they are at practice in the early morning, how much better is that than having them in classes? They're still missing out on their natural sleep inclinations to stay up later and sleep later. (I have some competitive swimmers who are in the pool around 6am...it practically kills them during busy school periods.) 2) what do these schools do in terms of interscholastic games? Most HS's still schedule after-school games for early afternoons. How do they deal if their schedules are "off" with their competition? I am genuinely curious because sports are often the impediment when we talk about changing the schedule at my school.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    One other thought about school schedules, looking at cwagner's post. I also believe that here in New England another reason we have the older kids going to school earlier than the younger ones is because of the late sunrise times during the winter. It's just not as safe to have the little ones out when it's still dark or not really light. I am assuming that that consideration is not as big a problem in Texas because they are much farther south?
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from cnanavati. Show cnanavati's posts

    Re: My beef with summer camps

    I was staying home alone all day in the summer when I was 11.  And the crime rate was much higher in the 80's than it is now.

    I'd have no trouble leaving an otherwise responsible rising high schooler  alone at home during the day for 2 weeks. 
     
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