Safe Sandbox sand???

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from apthappy. Show apthappy's posts

    Safe Sandbox sand???

    I've been doing research on sandbox sand for my daughter's new sandbox and have learned that the sand sold as "Sandbox Sand", at Home Depot, ToysRus etc is crushed quartz, which contains crystalline silica- which is proven to cause lung cancer over longtime exposure (from the dust) Now, the studies are based on occupational hazzards, ie working 40 hours per week for 20 years being exposed to it....Yet, I just can't bring myself to pour it in my daughters sandbox where I know she will be spending a lot of time over the next several years.  the safesand.com is WAY too expensive. I'm wondering if someone knows of a place locally that provides real sand (not silica).  Or if you did the research and decided to go w/ the Home depot stuff- and why? 
    Thanks!
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from that-guy. Show that-guy's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    Wow, this is just over the top.  Please take a step back and realize what you're doing here.  All sand is silica - that's what it is.  Are you really worried that playing in a sandbox is going to cause cancer?  Because then you shouldn't take your kids to the beach - that'll cause cancer, too.

    If you look hard enough - everything could be linked to cancer.   Too much air, too much water, too much light, too much dirt.  Please don't be a helicopter parent.  You do not need to do any research on sandbox sand.  Just dump a bag of sand in there and let them play. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    Every NE state, NY, and all the way down to Georgia,  as well as all great Lake and Rocky Mtn state,  most all naturally occurring sand is from granite with quartz crystal.   But every child who has ever played on a Maine beach of in a sandbox, nor beach workers, makes the list of at risk people.

       I did not take a lot of Occupational health courses,  but as I recall,  the data on dangers of silicate particles is from industrial sources, where grinding the silicate particles, quartz - also other things like magnesium compounds - makes for a very fine powder, where heat is present so almost no moisture.  Fan systems blow it around, and recirculate air with a significant  density of silicates suspended,  which is bad to breathe.  Especially 8 or more hours a day, 7 days a week.

        OSHA does not rate it a problem for even people who work on a beach or with sand or dirt in nurseries, 40 hours a week.  But it does rate places where gravel is crushed, cement powders are bagged,  and outdoors in desert type sand in windy conditions  as a health hazard needing filtered masks.
        I think the play sand people are trying to profit from scaring people, truthfully.

       Any fine solid particle is a hazard  if enough is breathed in.   We always spritz some water or give a quick hose spray, over the filled kiddie pools of sand we use as sandboxes,  as our parents did, so there will be little blown sand that gets in the eyes of kids and adults.  It also makes the sand a little "moldable"  if that is a word, like damp beach sand.
     
       I have seen people use large shakers with sand inside in sandboxes, often recycled powder or commercial salt and spice containers,  and don't think  that a good idea
    because short little arms shake it in their own face, and others. 
        Immediately after, they rub their eyes, working in / out grit.  So, breathing and eyes  a concern, I would not use a shaker that deliberately separates particles in the air.   But not from hazard data, merely rule of thumb, minimize blown particles of anything.
       
        Given the total number of lifetime hours kids spend at sand play,  I think airborne silicates  are  no big concern.
    These companies see linking to the research to give them a market share by putting down competitors.  In fact, the sandstones and such they use would not be safe if stirred up either - there just is not industrial data on it.   Even flour and grain dust from grain silos, baking industry places is considered a hazard, blown around in ventilation systems.  But we do not wear masks to protect us when making bread or pouring cereal!
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    I agree with Whatawag (shocking, I know!) for the most part.  I wouldn't worry about getting sand in eyes etc.--you do it once or twice and you learn it's not fun so you don't do it again.

    You can't protect kids from everything, and unless you're going to make them wear surgical masks at the beach and when they go to the playground, they're going to inhale some sand dust at some point.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    Can we actually all agree on something?  Even paranoid ol' kargiver would use regular sandbox sand.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

     "I agree with Whatawag (shocking, I know!) for the most part."
     Oh Daisy -  Open the button on your collar, take a deep breath, the shock will pass!

    But yes, on the scale of serious things parents  DO  have to worry about,  brands of approved play sand are down the priority list a ways.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    I think it belongs on the list somewhere around arsenic exposure from eating an apple core.  That being said, though, I do take the seeds out when I give the core pieces to the dog because of the infinitesimal amount of arsenic in them (that can't possibly hurt her) so I can understand being what others might easily see as over protective.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    Really?
        You should be taking them out because those pointy little indigestible things can accumulate and puncture the bowels at a time when fairly dry stools being passed pushes those sharp points into the intestine wall - like dull bits of glass.
        Everyone talks of dogs having a fair tolerance for bacteria which cause food poisoning in us,  which is true.   As soon as there are little cuts on the inner intestine wall, where abscesses can form and pockets of random bacteria multiply, that resistance is gone.

       I think one of the pups of an old dog of ours was accidentally killed by a well meaning cousin.  They let it eat mash discarded from pressing cider and juice , at their farm stand, thinking, if apples were given in small enough quantities not to give doggie the runs, no different from othe squash etc the doggie was used to.

       Just before it dies - the vet realized through questioning, what was likely causing the fever.  

        Confirmed after death -  in 2 weeks of apple harvest, maybe 1/2 cup of mash each evening, enough seeds to have over 20 little abscesses in the intestine, a number with a seed still partly lodged point in. Clear when vet removed a section to see what was up.
          Beautiful 9 month old Malamute.  What a shock, as completely unintentional.

         But yes, the arsenic amount/ risk would be low  from apple seeds,  unless you gave doggie the boiled mash residue from making applesauce and straining out skins, seeds after cooking.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Safe Sandbox sand???

    Huh, lucky break I've been taking them out, I guess!  Have you seen the allergy thread, Waggie?  Poor Gracie...
     

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