Toy Story 3?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Toy Story 3?

    I know this is sort of a silly post, but I watched Toy Story 3 for the first time last night. I'm so glad I watched it myself before letting my 3 year old kids see it. By the time it was over I was crying. Who in their right mind would think any child should see this movie? It's all about abandonment and loss, the toys are abused, jailed, tossed away and almost incinerated. We all love the original one - and I enjoy Pixar movies in general (my kids adore Cars) so I was kind of shocked at this one. Anyone else think this or am I just oversensitive?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from quadgirl1234. Show quadgirl1234's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    My DD has seen it.  I dont think the kids get it so I would not be as worried about it as you may think.  I will say the monkey is wicked scary and DD does not like that part.   I feel the kids movies all have an adult side to them that they kids dont understand. 

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I haven't seen it, but I do know that my mom previewed every movie when I was little, and if that had been her description of it, I wouldn't have gotten to see it. She took flack for that stance by those who thought she was nuts (usually her brother who would have thought it was fine for my cousin who was exactly my age), but that's how she felt, and she stood by it...much to my chagrin at the time.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I do have friends with 3 year olds who have been frightened by Nemo and other movies so I try to be careful.

    I was practically sobbing when they were all about to go into the incinerator and the end had me all weepy. My poor DH came home at the end and was like, "What's wrong?!" I looked at him and said, "(sniff, sniff) Toy Story 3 is NOT for kids!"

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from quadgirl1234. Show quadgirl1234's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    If you think about it, most disney movies have some sort of tragedy.. Lion King- dad Dies, Nemo - Mother dies,Bambi-mother dies.    Thats just part of life.  I do think Toy Story 3 does have some parts to it, like going into the incinerator that may be much but I never looked at it like DD would have an issue with it.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Nemo, Lion King and Bambi are all on the no-show list over here for now. Nemo has a kidnapping for heavens sake!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    If it makes you feel better I have every intention of handling it like you and my mom did if i ever get the chance. Many more agreed with quad than with my mom by the way; evenback in the 70s she got ridiculed for what they called overprotectiveness. I'm not saying or thinking quad is being disrespectful at all, just voicing her opinion, but my mom said people were unabashedly mean to her about it (not her brother, he was respectful).
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from capecod1818. Show capecod1818's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    It is funny as I never really thought about this.  what do you guys think about Monsters, Inc.  Dear son loves this movie but now that we are on the subject...wondering if I should never have let him watch it.  He doesn't seem scared by the monsters but there are parts with good/bad monsters fighting over the little girl.  This post has definitely made me think about these types of movies.

    DS just turned 3.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I agree with Quad. I'm not sure a 3-year old is going to pick up on the same messages as you. I mean even Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast have scary parts to it. 

    Didn't you see Bambi when you were younger?  Where you ok with it?

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    capecod I think your son will be fine.  I believe my son was either 3.5 or 4 when he saw it. He thought the monsters were too cute to be scary.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Some kids are more sensitive and intuitive than others at early ages; moms know their kids best and shouldnt be chastised or pooh poohed for protecting their kids from what they know will upset them possibly a lot more than others their age.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from LCGCmomma. Show LCGCmomma's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Lilly - I will definitely tell you that you know your family best, and if the parts of those movies that are scary/sad/more adult themes and that is something that doesn't work for you, then don't show it to the kids! Each child is different in what they can understand and handle at different ages, so stay true to what feels right to you. If people respect you as a parent, then they will honor the choices you make for your kids, even if they feel that their kids are okay with things that yours don't watch.

    I will say that my oldest nephew (now 8) is a pretty sensitive kiddo, and when he was younger, my SIL really sheltered him from a lot in both movies/tv and toys. Her hot button was things with violence, she really didn't like things where the characters were hitting/fighting with each other. I do feel personally that she went to a real extreme, and my nephew had a REALLY hard time as he got older, since one of the things he never learned was the difference between reality and movies/tv. And being especially sensitive as part of his personality, he would get really really upset if anything was even suggested that might hurt someone, etc. It took them a looooooong time before he could watch most cartoon movies without having to stop them, explain that character X is not really getting hurt, etc. That does NOT mean that I think he should have been pushed to watch or see more earlier, but I do think that there is probably a better balance.

    I do think that being allowed to see some "bad" things in a safer environment (tv/movie/playtime) where the final outcome is a happy ending is still a really important part of kid's development. If there are particular movies that your family isn't ready for, then by all means, don't show them! I would suggest making sure that the kids do get an opportunity to understand reality vs. fiction and that they don't get so sheltered that they get completely frightened/overwhelmed as they get older. That could just be watching an episode of Wonderpets where something has happened that they work together to solve. Something bad or frightening has happened and they fix it in the end.

    My DS is almost 2 and he is completely terrified of the monkey at the end of Toy Story 3, but he is in love with Buzz Lightyear and Woody, and could care less what they are doing as long as he can watch them do something on the screen. He really doesn't get the rest at all, but we try to watch TS1 or TS2 instead b/c of the monkey.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I am very careful about what my kids watch.  I agree that Toy Story 3 has mean people, mean language (Lotso), and the whole incinerator thing.  My kids were 8 and 10 when it came out, and I remember my husband and I saying as we left that it was nothing like the first two and we would not have wanted them to see it even a couple of years earlier.  

    Every kid is different, and they might not notice some things, but I think, if they are particularly observant and/or sensitive, that some of the things things that go over others' heads can be very upsetting.  When my oldest was almost 7 we saw Ratatouille at the theater.  He was a little tense when the beginning started off with the woman shooting all over the place. Then there were a few other uncomfortable parts, but no big deal.  The final straw was when they showed a bottle of rat poison and a rats tail implying he was dead; he stood up in the theater, said, "that's it!" and started to walk out.  I followed after him and he refused to go back in.  After a few minutes my husband and 4 year old came out and the little one had no idea why his brother was upset.  We all left, and to this day (he is 11) he has no interest in seeing it ever again!  Another movie he stopped halfway through was Happy Feet.  I'm not sure why, as I wasn't paying close enough attention, but  many kids love it and would have no clue as to what could be upsetting.  However, he has watched Monsters, Inc. since he was 3, and that never scared him.  
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I love Monsters Inc., but I was worried about showing it to them. And Capecod - if your son loves the movies then it's fine. My twins  haven't actually shown any ill effects from watching anything - but I haven't shown them many movies.I guess it's why I love Curious George (PBS show) - no bad people or scary situations.
    I did let DD watch "A Bug's Life" the other day and she was watching, but then got bored and walked away. She wasn't scared though - and those grasshoppers are kinds scary.
    Everyone is probably right that the scary stuff is over their heads right now.
    Current favorites are Milo & Otis, Aristocats, Cars and Toy Story (1 &2).

    BTW - I've never seen Bambi or Dumbo. My mother hated them so she never took me to see them when I was little. And yes -almost EVERY Disney movie has a dead mother... drives me crazy!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from lizinboston. Show lizinboston's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I cried at the end of TS3, too. Also, I know a TON of people who were terrified of The Wizard of Oz, but growing up it was my all time favorite movie. I think I watched it once a week starting at the age of 4 or 5.

    Dumbo is the most depressing movie ever. Teenagers abusing an elephant who is tied up at the circus, then they take her baby away?? The scene when they are in seperate cages and their trunks are touching kills me. I can never watch that movie again.

    But, if you think about it all Disney has some sick, twisted plot to it. Ever see the b0ner on the priest at the end of The Little Mermaid? Or how in the Lion King there are a bunch of leaves that swish in the air and spell out "sex"?? Why is the white rabbit in Alice in Wonderland so hyper all the time?!?! The "white" rabbit....hmmm? Also those flowers were terrible to Alice. Lady and the Tramp the owners treat Lady like sh*t when their baby comes, Snow White is just all around creepy...I mean a queen hunting for a young girls heart???? A woman talking about how she is going to take little puppies and make a fur coat out of them in 101 Dalmations?!

    Ok, I just went on a rant. I love ALL things Disney, but all of them having scary/messed up elements to them.

    Now, I've never seen Up, but everyone I know who has, cried within the first 5 minutes of that movie.

    A movie I LOVE is "Follow That Bird", a Sesame Street movie. Although, Big Bird is kidnapped....but I love all things Sesame as well.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I wasn't pooh paaing anything. I was offering a different opinion, which is the purpose of the boards.  I too know children like the one LGC mentioned.  My son was able to grasp things that are fake and make believe.  Now I wouldn't let him watch a couple of the Harry Potter movies until he was 11 and I wouldn't let him see the Hunger Games at all even though his 5th grade classmates were seeing it.  He's also the oldest in his class.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Oh Up.  Yes I cried, my son got the reference but didn't cry. They show pictures of the older man's life, etc.  Very good movie.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Winter, not only did I not accuse anyone here of dismissing concerns, but I said outright that my mom was ridiculed for not wanting me to see the movies that "all the other kids" were watching. I happen to think she shouldn't have been; she found it hurtful that her own brother told her she was being ridiculous, and my saying so is not an implication that anyone here is being disrespectful of anyone.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    OK Kar, no worries.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Cool, no hard feelings. :)
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Interesting discussion.  I think what triggers fear is very individual.  I have not seen TS3, but I sobbed and sobbed at Up.  However, my niece (8) can't watch the Bee Movie because she doesn't like the scene where the guy tries to swat the bee.  (In general, animated things seem more alarming to her than live action - not sure why.)

    For some reason, I was talking about kid movies to my therapist recently and how there are so many very sad things that happen (many of the cases you guys mentioned above, bambi, et cetera).  She said that often those things are related to kids processing loss and growing up.  For example, Bambi's mother dies and he has to make it on his own.  Kids are hopefully not dealing with an actual parent's death in most cases, but they're dealing with: I'm separate from my mom.  I'm getting big.  Can I be big?  How will I take care of myself?  What if something happens to my mom?  What is getting big all about?
    Anyway, I thought it was an interesting perspective.  The processing of life through art, even if the art is Disney.  :)

    Also: a couple of years ago I caught part of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang on TV.  Holy cow - the kid catcher???  They find all these kids locked up???  It scared me so badly I almost threw up and I had to lie down on the floor.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from summerbride09. Show summerbride09's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    DH and I saw this before I was even PG (Pixar movies are a guilty pleasure...I have no shame about it!). We were both surprise at how dramatic it was, but it wouldn't stop me from letting my LO watch it. Granted, she's years away from watching movies, but I will let her watch all the Disney classics I watched.

    A movie is a movie- I don't want to offend anyone but my opinion is that keeping kids so shielded and sheltered is detrimental. They need to be exposed to things, even a sad scene in a movie...it can open up discussions and be a learning experience. Plus they need to learn the difference between reality and fiction.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    But, sometimes a year makes the difference between giving a child nightmares or a great life lesson. The same movie might be appropriate and helpful for your five year old but would have been overwhelming and an overall negative experience when he was three or four, for instance. Being attuned to a child's readiness makes the teachable moments turn out as planned.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from purplecow89. Show purplecow89's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    I'm OK with everything but Peter Pan--forget dying moms and scary monsters, fairy tales and folk tales have always had those.  But how about a bunch of tomahawk chopping Indians singing a song about What Makes the Red Man Red (except Lily the princess who is paler), all the mermaids harem flirting with Peter Pan, and Tinkerbell so jealous of Wendy getting his attention she tells Hook where she is by jumping in the inkwell and making footprints on the map...Boy wants girl but still wants to go play in the mud with his younger friends.

    The conflicted feelings of a boy at puberty, written by a man who was most likely a pedophile.  Just dandy.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: Toy Story 3?

    Well said, Kar.  

    Not letting kids watch something before they are developmentally ready to process it is not keeping them "so shielded".  Yes, they do need to learn the difference between reality and fiction, which is why if they see things on tv or in movies that they are not ready to handle, or capable of differentiating, they may think that is reality. Heck, a lot adults think what they see on tv is real. A friend told me she let her 10 year old see Hunger Games and cheer on the characters because she didn't want to shield him from the "real world". Seriously. I'm sorry, but a bunch of teenagers trapped in an arena fighting until all but one is dead is the real world?!   

    Of course, people can do what they want with their own children, and I don't question their judgment.  However, it drives me nuts that so many people think they can laugh or tell me I am wrong or overprotective for thinking of my kids in advance.  I don't think it's a positive thing when a 5 year old can watch Harry Potter, Hunger Games, and other PG-13 movies and not be phased by any of it. It disturbs me that they can be so desensitized to the violence.  

    Just the other day, the mother of an 11 year old basically told me her son watches whatever he wants, including horror movies, and has unlimited use of the computer as well because, as she repeated multiple times to justify it, "You can't run from it".  Geesh, may as well buy him alcohol too since he'll get it eventually.  

    Sorry to sound so argumentative, but I never really say anything to anyone, however nobody hesitates to tell me I'm wrong.  I try to avoid telling people if there is a certain thing I haven't let my kids watch because I don't want a lecture from them!
     

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