baby food

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    baby food

    DD is almost 4 months and I've started thinking about food for her.  I'm not in a rush, but just thinking about it.

    I had thought I'd make my own baby food, but have not researched it at all yet.  A friend recently told me that certain fruits/veggies have nitrates that are not good for babies and that babyfood companies know which produce to buy that does not have those nitrates.  She was saying that for this reason she's not making her own.

    Do any of you know about this?  Do you have any books on making your own baby food you can recommend?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: baby food

    I had "Super Baby Food" and was all set to make food for my twins.  I quickly realized that I couldn't handle all that pre-cleaning of dishes etc in order to steam some carrots and peas.  I mostly fed them Earth's Best and the Gerber Organic. And I have heard that some foods have nitrates - I think carrots are one of them.  Also the website wholesomebabyfood.com is a good source.
    I used Super Baby Food for ideas about which food to indroduce when, and when it came time to try finger foods.
    I know lots of people do make their own - there is even a starter kit at my grocery store.! :)
    Good luck
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: baby food

    If I remember correctly you only need to worry about nitrates in root vegetables like carrots (they absorb it through the soil while developing underground).  However, it's not a problem for thick skinned starchy veggies like sweet potatoes.  I mostly made my own baby food since we belonged to an organic CSA that first year and I had a lot of veggies to use up.  I don't know what kind of pre-cleaning Misslily is referring to...we just steamed, baked, roasted or boiled in our regular pots and pans and stored either in take n toss containers or ice cube trays.  I agree that wholesomebabyfood.com is one of the best resources.

    I will add that I'm not super, crazy, all natural parenting woman either.  I hate to cook and clean and I worked a nearly full time schedule for the first year of DS's life.  I usually prepared his meals from the same stuff that DH and I were eating (minus the seasoning) or made big batches of baby food on Sunday nights.

    Just a quick example: take a whole squash (acorn, butternut, etc), cut in half, scoop seeds, place cut side down in a roasting pan with a little bit of water.  Roast at 350 degrees until soft and tender.  Cool. Scoop out flesh, puree in a food processor or blender, and place in containers of your choice.  That would make enough squash to get us through at least a week or two, if not more. Freeze and defrost as needed.  As baby gets older, you can add a little cinnamon or nutmeg or maple syrup or whatever for seasoning and flavor.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: baby food

    Oh, not that there's anything really wrong with jar food either.  We supplemented with Earth's Best for stuff like prunes or other stuff that caught my eye at the store.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: baby food

    We are making some of our baby food (6 months old).  Actually, she only started two weeks ago, and so far I've made all of it, but I plan to do a mix.  As notanewbie said, I'm not heckbent on doing all of it and I'll just do what I feel like doing and get jars for the rest.
    So, I have two books that people gave me (Top 100 Baby Purees and Cooking for Baby).  The Cooking for Baby has some neat recipes for older babies and toddlers that I might try.  In both books, the recipes for pureed food are as follows:  Cook food.  Puree it.  Sometimes mix different purees together for a new taste sensation.
    If you have the website everyone mentioned above (wholesomebabyfood), you don't really need a book for this early stuff.

    In terms of logistics:
    I haven't tried carrots yet (and I've been nervous about root vegetables as well), but the website has an article on nitrates:  http://www.wholesomebabyfood.com/nitratearticle.htm
    I do very large batches (like a humongous squash) and freeze in ice cube trays.
    I don't do any pre-cleaning of anything... but I also didn't know until recently that people sterilize bottles, so I might not be the one to ask.
    For naturally soft foods like avocado and banana, I just cut a piece off and mush it, and then put the rest in the fridge for next time.  If it seems like it would go bad before she gets to it, I eat it.  :)

    In my opinion, it's something to have fun doing if you feel like it, but not to feel compelled to do every last bit.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from LiveLoveLearnEnjoy. Show LiveLoveLearnEnjoy's posts

    Re: baby food

    This website looks awesome...thanks for thread poppy.  I have been thinking about solid foods as well and didn't really know where to start or what to do so this was so helpful.  I'm not sure which boat I am in regarding buying or making baby food but the website definitely made it seem manageable if I do decide to make it.  My SIL gave me a book "Cooking for Baby" but I haven' had an opportunity to look at it. 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: baby food

    I did all my own baby food.  I would steam the veggies on the weekends, blend them in the blender, and then pour the puree into icecube trays. Once they were frozen I popped out the cubes of baby food into freezer bags, segregated by type.  It only took one nap's worth of time on Sunday to prep everything, then I had a whole bunch of different types ready to go. 
    Once she could handle thicker food I started feeding her mashed up food from whatever we were eating for dinner. 

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from MM379. Show MM379's posts

    Re: baby food

    Super Baby Food was great for ideas, thoughts on what to introduce when, tips on preparations for different age ranges, but a little over the top for me to follow to a T. 
    I did a mix of making baby food, especially with super-easy preparation foods (banana, avocado, anything that was a quick steam then puree) but if I needed to do too much peeling, chopping, roasting, etc... I just didn't do it.  I liked Earth's Best, Gerber Organic, and that slightly more generic looking line at Whole-Foods near the Earth's Best... was it Baby Organic or something?  I also like some of the blends that the jars came with and also used them for getting DS used to the taste of meat b/c pureeing meat just grossed me out and he didn't have teeth until 1 year, so I was paranoid about consistency at first, then I did move on to really moist/soft bits of chicken, turkey burger, etc. that I cooked.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from nene72. Show nene72's posts

    Re: baby food

    I make our babyfood as well.  It was a great way to use food from the CSA in the winter.  Similar to others, I make the food on Sunday and freeze in ice cube trays.  It really doesn't take that much time.  The Wholesome Babyfood website is a good resource and Cooking Light has a cookbook that is pretty easy to follow. 

    IPW-I think it depends on the softness of the food.  I don't steam bananas but serve them to DD when they are really ripe and I can mash them up.  I also plan on doing this with avocado as well.  However, harder fruits like pears and apples, I would steam and puree.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from CoffeeQueen. Show CoffeeQueen's posts

    Re: baby food

    I make all of DS' food with the exception of a jar here and there. Jars are easier to transport on vacations and for on the go meals, then I save the empty jars to transport the homemade food to playdates etc.  I use wholesomebabyfood.com too and also the Williams Sonoma baby food cookbook (can't remember the exact name).  I steam all of the fruits with the exception of avocados and bananas.  It's really is easy once you get in the habit of making the food.  I usually do one HUGE cooking session every other Sunday.  DS is a pork pie and eats like a monster and we usually make it 2 weeks before daycare is asking for more food, lol.

    IPWbride, I also got the Beaba babycook and cookbook as gifts and when we got around to doing solids I found it much easier to use my food processor.  I make big batches and from what I've heard the Beaba is great for making meals short order.  It wasn't going to work for us (plus my kitchen is bursting at the seams as it is) so I returned it to WS for a credit. There are probably moms on here that have the babycook and love it, I just wanted to share my 2 cents.

    Also, Lemon posted in another thread about mashing banana and avocado together in a ziploc bag.  I did this for DS the other night and he went bananas (sorry I had to). Thanks Lemon!!!
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from canukgrl. Show canukgrl's posts

    Re: baby food

    I made all DD's baby food and have a freezer stash started for DS, who so far is only toying with solids... I got a food mill for my shower and thought "sure, whatever, I'm a working mom" but it was actually a lot easier and do-able than I had expected.  It's really not all that long that you need do it, a few months and I spent maybe 3 or 4 Sunday afternoons doing up a big pile and freezing it plus I'd also puree leftovers (for instance, put on some extra broccoli, we steam ours, so leave the lid on the pot while you eat and the leftovers will be mushy and good for baby by the time you're cleaning up)  I thought the ice cube method was more pain than it was worth and I use 4 or 8 oz ziplock/take n toss type containers.  I spent about 10 bucks to get started and then just cycle them thru.  I also steamed everything except avacados and bananas, which would both be very ripe before I gave them.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from SarahInActon. Show SarahInActon's posts

    Re: baby food

    I made all my own baby food because it is ten million times cheaper - and I did it all organic for about 20% what the jarred stuff costs!  I looked with longing at that lovely Beeba babycook thing from Williams Sonoma but I'm really glad I didn't get it.  It only cooks a tiny portion at a time and takes forever and BOY is it expensive.

    I steamed everything one morning on the weekends and then froze it all into ice cube trays and then stored in freezer baggies as others commented.  I did ask my pedi about nitrates in the root veggies (like carrots) but he said not to worry so I didn't.  I also didn't go overboard on any one day with any one food.  I know some others may want to be more cautious.

    Things that are soft on their own like banana and avocado just got mashed up right before I feed them.  Other stuff like prunes and any of the dehydrated stuff got soaked with hot water and then purreed.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: baby food

    I got a babycook from my MIL, and I used it a little, but I would not have bought it myself.  I already had a food processor which I think is way more practical, so if you don't have one, I'd make the trade.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from CoffeeQueen. Show CoffeeQueen's posts

    Re: baby food

    Besides baby food I use the food processor a lot, it's definately a work horse in my kitchen (I have a 9 cup cuisinart).  I shred cabbage for coleslaw, buy the big blocks of cheese at BJ's and shred it myself (cheaper than buying the stuff already shredded and bagged), emulsify homemade dressings. The list goes on, you can use the thing for EVERYTHING. Love love love it.

    WS does mark their stuff up. If you dont have to use the credit for the processor I would reccomend going to bed bath and beyond and using a 20% off coup.  I also have this and it's handy for small babyfood batches plus its cheaper than the bigger versions:

    http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DLC-2ABC-Processor-Brushed-Chrome/dp/B0000645YM/ref=sr_1_3?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1296838034&sr=1-3

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from CoffeeQueen. Show CoffeeQueen's posts

    Re: baby food

    Poppy sorry to hijack your post with my food processor chit chat. ;)
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from dstouw. Show dstouw's posts

    Re: baby food

    I made my own baby food for our now 10 month old.  At first I would steam peas or other veggies and used a food mill that I got as a hand me down from my sister.
    http://www.amazon.com/KidCo-Baby-Steps-Food-Carrying/dp/B00006G9LI

    She was not into eating solid foods until she was about 7 months old and pretty soon after she decided she didn't like purees anymore and wanted what was on our plates.
    Now I don't often cook specifically for her.  She will eat mushy steamed broccoli, sweet potato, squash, scrambled eggs, bread, cheerios, applesauce, yogurt, refried beans, chicken thighs that I cook in the slow cooker until the meat is really soft, bananas, melon, pineapple, chopped spinach with shredded parmesan cheese, and many more things as long as they are soft and can be mushed in her mouth.  Her doctor said after 9 months that she can have anything except honey.

    The puree baby food stage doesn't last that long , although I guess it depends on the kid
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: baby food

    Yeah...what dstouw said.

    The puree phase was very short for us as well.  We waited until 6 months (well we tried it at 5.5) to start solids and DS wasn't really into it for about another month after that and then he moved onto finger foods by the time he was 10 months old.  So for us, it was only about 4 months of purees.  His first "real" meal was Thanksgiving dinner at exactly 10 months old.  He just ate exactly what we had.  Squash, mashed potatoes, stuffing, shredded turkey and green beans cut up really tiny (and cooked a little longer than everyone else's).  I think the pumpkin pie was his favorite part of the meal though.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: baby food

    A food processor is the best thing I have in my kitchen, for both baby stuff and our stuff.
    If you don't want to get one, though, you can get a manual food mill for cheap.  They have ones at BRU for under $20 that are baby specific.  And they sell normal ones at the hardware store (or Amazon) -- they are big and made of metal and you turn a hand crank.  If I were going the food mill route, I would get a big one like that.  Better for large batches.

    I just looked at the Beaba thing (I had never heard of it) -- it looks beautiful and convenient, but... for that amount of money you could get a sweet food processor that you would use for years.  The KitchenAid 12 cup is the recommendation of the super @nal Cook's Illustrated equipment tests, and it's $169 before any coupons.  I love my Cuisinart one and it was even less than that.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from nene72. Show nene72's posts

    Re: baby food

    I can't really add more than I love my Cuisinart.  It is a lifesaver! I use it for everything as everyone has mentioned above. When we hosted our first Thanksgiving, it was instrumental in the prep phase.  I used it for grating cheese, chopping vegetables, making dough.  Its definately an investment more than the Beaba Cook.  I
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from LiveLoveLearnEnjoy. Show LiveLoveLearnEnjoy's posts

    Re: baby food

    Has anyone seen or used this???

    http://www.trybabybullet.com/

    I have friends who swear by the magic bullet so I was just curious about this one.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from nene72. Show nene72's posts

    Re: baby food

    I've seen the informercial and my DH was asking me if I wanted it.  I was tempted but we have enough gadgets and honestly I have the strainer/food processor combo down but I would love to hear if its as easy as they make it sound on the informercial!
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from LiveLoveLearnEnjoy. Show LiveLoveLearnEnjoy's posts

    Re: baby food

    Me too!  We just started solids at 5 months so I haven't yet made anything myself (he has had oatmeal cereal and banana).  My SIL gave us a mini food processor and baby book for xmas but I haven't used it yet.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: baby food

    Bumping this for Twin04!
    Also, I searched the archives for baby food, and there were A LOT of threads if you want to look through.
    One common theme is that you don't need special equipment if you already have a food processor, although some people really like the special equipment and find it easier to manage.  The other common theme is that you don't need a cookbook, although some of them are fun and useful.
    And a lot of people like this website:
    http://wholesomebabyfood.momtastic.com/

    Have fun!
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from twin04. Show twin04's posts

    Re: baby food

    Thanks Medford!!! My sister gave me a 3 cup Hamilton Beach food processor for xmas with 4 ice cube storage trays. I'll search through and what I can find. I'll also take a look at the wholesomebabyfood website.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: baby food

    I just got the Ninja stick blender with the chopper/blender bowl and smoothie thing.  I LOVE it.  Just started using it instead of the blender to make our daily breakfast shakes, and make a frozen strawberry and yogurt puree yesterday to pour into the ice cream maker.  Pulverized the whole frozen strawberries so the result was very pink,smooth yogurt in seconds.  I've also used the stick blender in a soup and tomato sauce in a sauce pan and more shallow saute pan. 

    I'll be using it more than my blender and food processor combined, I can see already.  If I were going to make baby food, it would be my go-to appliance.  Powerful, easy to clean, and the double-decker chopping blades is a big improvement over my traditional food processor.  You can also puree right in the pot with the stick blender.  It makes things as smooth or chunky as you want.
     

Share