best baby food maker?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from nell98. Show nell98's posts

    best baby food maker?

    Hi ladies.. I read these boards off and on, but rarely post. Thought I would ask a question about baby food makers and see if anyone has any insights for me!

    My questions are:
     1) What are the pros and cons of the different brands? (Beaba, Baby Brezza, Baby Bullet, etc.) and 
     2) Are they really necessary or is it just as easy to steam the veggies separately and then use a food processor? 
     3) In the beginning, do you find yourself making baby food meal-by-meal or making a big batch of something in advance and freezing it?

    Thanks!
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    A friend of mine got the Beaba as a gift and returned it in favor of steaming them the way she always does and using a food mill.  The latter worked great for her and she isn't stuck with a teeny $150 vegetable steamer/puree machine.  Ice cube trays are good for freezing extra portions.  Get the silicon ones; they're flexible so you can pop out individual cubes.

    I've never been one to clutter my kitchen with extra appliances - where to store them is a problem.  On the counter?  Get it in and out of a closet every day?  I'd definitely not invest in an appliance that I'd only use for a few months when I could do it with what I have in my cabinets already just as well.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ml2620-2. Show ml2620-2's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    We got a hand held cuisinart that has a mini food processor attachment and a blender. Way better than anything that slaps a "baby" label on itself. We are sadly through the baby food stage (which really only lasts 2-3 months!) but we still use the hand blender for lots of stuff. 

    I also recommend the freezer cube trays with the lids over the mini babyfood containers from one step ahead. I liked being able to pop the food out and did not want to put the one step ahead containers in the microwave, but sometimes could not get food out of them without doing that. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    (If anything is frozen stuck in a container, it comes out pretty easily if you dip it in hot water from the tap for 30 seconds to a minute if you don't want to use the microwave.)

    ETA:  And, to add a little bit to the OP, consider how much a month you'd pay to use a machine to do this.  The Beaba is $150 plus tax = $160.  Divide that by 3, that's $53/month of use.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from KD183. Show KD183's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I made all of my son's baby food and steamed it (if it needed to be cooked) or just threw it in my food processor.  I have a good size CuisinArt food processor that I used for big batches and a small CuisinArt that I used for single servings.  If you're going to make all of your own food I definately recommend using a regular food processor and doing large batches.  I did buy the freezer trays with lids from Buy Buy Baby for freezing, then transferred the cubes into freezer bags for longer-term storage.  I highly recommend the cookbook "First Meals" by Annabel Karmel for both the infant and the toddler years.  Good luck!!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I just used the food processor.  I liked to make big batches anyway.  I would do a whole pound or two at a time, freeze into ice cube trays, then once frozen transfer to freezer bags.  I'd have a few varieties in the freezer at any given time.  If you don't have a food processor, it's worth the money to buy one, they're really useful.  You can spend the money you would have spent on a one-use machine and get something that will help you make all sorts of useful things. 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    If someone buys you one of those baby food makers just return it and use the store credit to buy diapers.  :)
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from winter09wedding. Show winter09wedding's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I got the beaba as a gift- and it was initially great (first month) because you didn't have to get a whole bunch of stuff dirty. but it became really finickiny after a while (These two holes have to be perfectly aligned) and it doesn't make a whole bunch of food.  I wound up moving to a food processor and steaming the veggies separate.  I would make huge batches and freeze them.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    Yeah, and after using it a month, you're out $150 with no way to return it.  It's a marketing ploy that appeals to the joy and excitement of having a baby and having all things "baby."
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    Get the magic bullet or it's equivalent.  I had a food mill with my daughter which was a pain. The magic bullet is awesome for baby food, pureeing soups, salsa etc. etc.  You'll use it for much more than just baby food. 
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I can also recommend "Super Baby Food" for those who want to make their own.  Lots of great ideas - lists of when to introduce which foods and lots of recipes for toddler food too.  Don't forget - you only make puree for about 6 months max.
    I couldn't deal with making and storing, so I used Earth's Best Organic.  Even if you make your own, if you travel or go out a lot I'd suggest feeding some jarred food once in a while. Even the author in the book says it's a pain to lug homemade food around and to use jars.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    Great advice, misslily, some shelf stable jars to grab and go.  Adding a cooler to all the "go out" baby gear sounds like a pita.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    We used the organic pouch food to throw in our diaper bag for when we went out.  They're more expensive than the jars, but so convenient!  
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    Forgot about the pouches you all have now.  When my 2 1/2 year olds were in the baby food stage they didn't have those yet! :)
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from luvRIboy. Show luvRIboy's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    The pouches are the best!!! Even now at 13 months, they are the best means of getting DD to take medicine (injected into the pouch so she doesn't see the bright pink meds), and are my go-to when she's on an all-carb kick! 

    I did a mix of making my own food and buying.  It worked for us.  Just used the food processor or the mini-prep.  I only fed DD chicken/beef/fish, etc that I made (the jarred meat stuff grosses me out for myself, so for her too!), which I would mix in the mini-prep with some frozen veggies or a pre-made veggie puree. 

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from GC1016. Show GC1016's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I have the Beaba and actually still use/like it.  It doesn't take up much space, and I like that when I do my Sunday cooking, I can be steaming/making food for DD while the food processor/pots/etc ... are being used for other stuff.  

    But I already had a bunch of the stuff mentioned above (food mill, food processor, immersion blender) so if you're choosing between one or the other, I would probably go with a tool that has more uses, but the Beaba isn't a flat-out waste.  The puree stage is short, but I used mine all summer/fall, steaming veggies from our CSA and leaving them in bite-sized chunks for DD to eat.  I also received the rice/pasta cooker which I like if I'm just making a quick batch of something for DD.  

    I started making/freezing purees when she was about four months, started her on solids at six months, and am still using it now (14 months) to steam veggies.  

    So, to answer your original question: I like the Beaba; no, it's not necessary, and I made big batches based on what was in season.  I also bought flexible ice cube trays from Amazon and would freeze the purees in that, then pop them out into freezer bags that I would label and date.  

    I would say you DON'T need any of the "special" baby food storage stuff.  I'd just pop a couple of cubes of whatever into her containers for daycare and they'd be defrosted by lunch.  
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I am a very big fan of the OXO ice cube trays.  They have covers so they're easy to stack up in the freezer.  And the cubes come out really easily.  We would freeze in those and then dump into freezer bags.

    And yeah... pouch food is amazing.  It is delicious, it's easy to carry, and it's way easier to get the lid back on tight than it is with a jar.  And when they get bigger they can take it straight out of the pouch.
    Basically, it's addictive to parents.  :)
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from winter09wedding. Show winter09wedding's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    one thing about the amount that you make, I made bigger portions later- after I figured out that DS would eat sweet potatoes with everything. in the very beginning, with each new food, I would only make enough for the three days or so of trials. then I got all exciting toward the end blending things. the beaba was also nice for those smaller batches when I didn't need to make 3 sweet potatoes at the same time.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from GC1016. Show GC1016's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    I LOVE the pouches now that DD can squeeze them herself.  I feel like making our own was more cost-effective when she was on all purees, but now that it's more of a snack/add-on, they're awesome. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from GC1016. Show GC1016's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    Another plus for the pouches/jars -- they live at room-temp.  Given all the extened power-outages of late, that's no small thing.  I always have a small supply on hand, just in case. 
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from winter09wedding. Show winter09wedding's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    GC me too!! we only got them because of the hurricane, I was paranoid my frozen baby food stash wouldn't make it a week without power.  DS loves them.  I have found them to be much cheaper on subscribe and save/amazon.

    ps. nell- my DS likes to change the channel and hide the remote, and so we saw part of an infomercial for the baby bullet instead of the weather the other evening- then I saw it in Buy Buy Baby and got all excited it was only 70 dollars or something (a lot less than beaba). However, when I thought about it, managing all those little special jars and lids seemed overwhelming to manage- and wouldn't really be enough once you got going (we have to label everything for day care, so we bought the glad disposable stuff which holds 2 ice cubes perfect and a circular mabel's label on the top.)  when he was almost a year, DS was going through about 10 ice cubes a day- and I didn't want to feed him the same thing the whole day, so we had massive supplies in the freezer. the jars wouldn't have made it. short story: I wound up buying a food processor and used a pot to steam everything, so even if you get the bullet, you don't have to buy the baby one.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: best baby food maker?

    DD still loves anything that comes in a pouch.  I don't know why (except, they are pretty delicious - I've tasted them all).  When all else fails, eating wise, she'll down an entire pouch.  Forget the 4 homemade meals I've made trying to figure out what she might like to eat that day.
     

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