BF questions

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from thistleflower. Show thistleflower's posts

    Re: BF questions

    I would make an effort, while in the hospital, to nurse every time baby is hungry.  I wouldn't supplement with formula and I wouldn't pump.  Baby's stomach is the size of a marble--when born, they really don't need much and shouldn't need formula immediately.  You'll have 4 days, so you should still be in the hospital when your milk comes in and you should have some sense of whether things are still going well when it does.  But frequent nursing on demand will be the best (and least annoying--hated the pump) way to get lots to come in.  If by the time you leave it's not working, you'll know that and can start supplementing then, or (in view of your difficult work schedule and other things going on) just give up on breastfeeding and formula feed.    

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from marriedmom. Show marriedmom's posts

    Re: BF questions

    Hi there - I haven't posted in a long time,but I find this discussion totally irresistible b/c I hate to see people dreading and/or beating themselves up about breastfeeding. Yes, everyone knows it is a good health choice, but that doesn't mean that formula is bad either. That said, I (literally) am sitting here with baby #3 attached to one of the girls, so I will offer my opinion. But please know it's just my opinion of what would make BFing easier over time, and I never had to recover from a c-section, so maybe that invalidates some of my ideas. My first baby was a preemie though, and I endured months of stress and pumping and crying and all that, so I feel you on the anxiety and just want you to know that your first nursing experience isn't necessarily indicative of what this one will be. Mine were very different.

    So - my advice is keep the baby with you and don't pump at all. The baby is way, way better atstimulating milk production than any pump.

    When I had #3 last summer, she was latched onto my breast for seriously the first 12hours of her life. I thought I was going to die of exhaustion, really. But my milk came in really fast because of that, and I am sure that I more than made up that sleep time over the next few days b/c she was able to nurse and get a good feeding and then go to sleep for a few hours. It was a million times easier than with my oldest, when I was stuck on the hamster wheel of pumping to build a supply. 

    So - if you really are going to give BFing a try - I strongly recommend all baby/no pump. Well-intentioned nurses will probably try to soothe the baby for a bit beforebringing him or her to you, and you will miss the chance to get established early, which makes it so much easier. 

    But like others have said, if you're really not into it - for whatever reason - let yourself be okay about that. I know you have kids already, so you already know there are a million other things to beat yourself up about over the years. ;)

    Good luck!

     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Brighton1. Show Brighton1's posts

    Re: BF questions

    I haven't posted here in a while, but I agree with others that the best thing you can do for your supply is nurse nurse nurse.  The more frequently you put your baby to your breast, the sooner your milk will come in.  I've had two c-sections and no issues with supply.  I also sent both babies to the nursery every single night.  There's nothing wrong with getting a little sleep!  I aimed to nurse every 2 hours during the day and every 3 at night, unless they were fussy and needed to nurse sooner.  I also wouldn't start pumping until 3-4 weeks PP unless there's a medical need.  Pumping is a PITA and not as effective as the baby is at regulating your supply. 

    I don't know where you're delivering, but my hospital had excellent lactation consultants.  use whatever services are offered to you.  Good luck!

     
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