Cookbook for baby food?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from kaydo. Show kaydo's posts

    Cookbook for baby food?

    I want to start researching how to make my own baby food for when the time comes (DS starts cereal in 2 weeks - exciting!) and/or possibly start making and freezing some over the next couple of months, so I'm ready when he is.  I'm reading reviews of books on Amazon and many say they're great, but with caveats about authors not discussing nitrates, not realizing that the AAP recommends no cow's milk before 12 months, etc.  Has anyone found a good, SIMPLE, well-researched baby cookbook?  (I'm not hellbent on feeding organic but I'd use an organic cookbook if it were a really good one.)  I barely have time to make a decent meal for me and my husband as it is, these days, so I figure simplicity will be key to my success with this.  These are the ones I'm currently leaning towards:

    Blender Baby Food:
    http://www.amazon.com/Blender-Baby-Food-Recipes-Homemade/dp/0778801187/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267833575&sr=1-6

    Top 100 Baby Purees:
    http://www.amazon.com/Top-100-Baby-Purees-Healthy/dp/0743289579/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267833575&sr=1-4

    Cooking for Baby:

    http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Baby-Wholesome-Homemade-Delicious/dp/1416599193/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267833575&sr=1-7

    The Everything Organic Cooking for Baby and Toddler Cookbook:

    http://www.amazon.com/Everything-Organic-Cooking-Baby-Toddler/dp/1598699261/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267833575&sr=1-1

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from laha8. Show laha8's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I bought and referenced Super Baby Food daily.  My son is almost two and I still sometimes reference it.  It contains so much helpful information on age to introduce certain food, highly nutritious foods, etc.

    I also referenced www.wholesomebabyfood.com and www.weelicious.com.

    Good luck!  Making your own baby food can seem like a lot of work at times, but it's so much better!  If you'd like any more tips on food, bpa free products for freezing and storing, etc., I'd be happy to pass some along.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Congratulations to you, kaydo - for considering making your own home made baby food. There are plenty of articles that say, that even though jarred food is convenient, home made is the best choice for baby.
    Even though jarred food says "all natural" it still has plenty of stuff (cornstarch f. ex) no one would feed to a baby. And temperatures during high heat canning ruin lots of nutrients.
    I made my own. But at that time, there were no cook books for baby food. I just mashed up the veggies, we were eating at our meals. Home made baby food also has a different taste and consistency, that makes the transition to finger food later on a lot easier.
    At several of the baby showers, I recently attended, the mothers had registered for and received the "Beaba Baby Cook" (it comes with a cook book). They all use it and love it. It is on the expensive side (around $150), but there are others not so elaborate for a lot less. A mini processor will do a good job too. So will just a fork with a little of the cooking liquid.
    Good luck cooking for baby!
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from happy2bpg. Show happy2bpg's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Kaydo -- I feed my DD the convenient commercially made crap that, according to pingo "no one would feed a baby" -- shame on me, what kind of mother must I be, right?? -- but we did get a book on baby food called , "Better Baby Food" by Daina Kalnins and Joanne Saab.  It has some great general information on formula, feeding and lots of common questions and answers regarding the two topics. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Happy--you give your daughter FORMULA?!  No wonder you think that canned crap is ok....  For shame!  :P
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    We have Blender Baby food.  I'll give it to you if you want it.  I think that there were a few good recipes in it, but in the end www.wholesomebabyfood.com was my bible.  Once you kind of got a feel for what you could give your baby when, it just came down to buying fresh produce (organic if you like, I did that often) or frozen veggies/fruit during the winter, and just mashing them up for a while.  I usually added breastmilk to thin things down.  Then you can start adding textures like meats and chicken later down the line.  I really recommend wholesomebabyfood!!!  


     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from KAM2007. Show KAM2007's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Kaydo, I made all food for DS, never bought a cook book. Don't think their necessary. the internet is a great place of free information. And this stage is so short, only lasted maybe 3 months before DS was eater to eat everything on our plate.

    What I did was pick a fruit/veggie I wanted to introduce, steam it or roast it, use my emersion blender-if you don't have one yet, their the best invention ever! mushed things up and froze stuff in an ice cube tray. Then thawed one or two cubes which was the perfect amount for the early feeding.

    DS loved the roasted veggies the best. I'd take a butternut squash, roast in the over until totally tender, peel, then a final mash and he loved it. Sweet potatoes were a big hit too. He was not a fan of zuchinni-the texture wasn't that appealing.

    Think about it this way, if you'd like the food combo, then make it, and serve it. It doesn't have to be that complicated, simple at first, then more interesting combos as they go. As long as you're providing a variety of foods, I never worried about nitrates or the such. But I always gave DS a variety of foods in the day/week.

    Funniest look DS ever gave us was when he tried avacado-I wish I had a camera for that one. DS now loves it, but the first bite was interesting!

    Oh, one thing I found out the hard way, bananas bind babies BM's up...so, serve very ripe bananas easier on little tummies.

    When DS started teething, we'd take a big slice of cold tomato and let DS chomp away at it...nice cool sensation on his teeth. Watermelon was also good for teething.

    Have fun with food!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I also recommend using wholesomebabyfood.com and other internet sources.  I don't think a book is necessary since it is such a short phase before they move on to regular table food cut into small bites.  As someone else said, just go with your instincts on food combinations.

    We did a ton of squash and sweet potato at the beginning.  So easy!  Just cut a winter squash of any type in half, place cut side down in a roasting pan with a little water for about 40 min, Scoop it out and either mash or food process to desired consistency. Bananas (although a bit binding unless very ripe) were great for "on the go" baby food.  You can bring a whoe banana (in its skin) to a restaurant with a small tupperware container, mash with a fork at the table and voila...instant baby food. We also did a lot of homeamde applesauce, peaches, mango (great for clearing up constipation) and other fruits.

    You can food process almost anything you are planning on eating for dinner just watch out for spices.  You can set aside a small quantity when cooking a stew or pasta dish before adding salt, etc and serve that to baby. A funny note on spices though...my son was getting very fussy about eating his squash at one point (something he had loved previously), one day we added a bit of cinnamon to change the flavor a bit and he LOVED it.  Remember that at some point, you will want to start integrating mild spice flavor to infants so that they can develop their palate and enjoy food like we do.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I have two babyfood cookbooks that cover first foods through toddlerdom, but I can't remember the names. I will post them tonight at home. But I agree with most everybody else that for first foods, you don't really need recipes, just go without salt, and introduce spices slowly. If you introduce foods one at a time it is easier to figure out if something disagrees with your LO. But don't think that babies only want bland food. My DD loves Indian food, and we had a slighlty spicy putanesca sauce the other night that she enjoyed so much she practcally ate her body weight. It all depends on the baby, but if you eat a variety of foods, and let them try them, you might be surprised at what they like.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Happy and Daisy,

    First off, this is a thread about making your own baby food and which book to get.

    Secondly, I was not answering to any of YOUR posts. So, why the hostility?

    Thirdly, I NEVER ever said, that commercial baby food was "crap", as you both so eloquently call it. All I ever said was, that home made baby food is BETTER for baby, and I still believe that. Considering the many posts on this thread, I am apparently not the only one, that thinks that.

    Finally, truly Happy, would you feed your daughter corn starch? I think not. And Daisy, what in the world does feeding your baby FORMULA has to do with Baby Cook Books?
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    It's not you, Pingo.  Let it go, trust me, not worth it.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from jag27. Show jag27's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    That is problem with sarcasm on this boards - not everyone gets it no matter if you put smiley faces or not.

    I feed my daughter baby food from the jar, but I only buy them after reading the labels.  Most of them it is just the fruit or vegetable blended with water.  I haven't come across any of the baby food I feed my DD that has corn starch and I'm sure it would have be on the label if it is in the food.

    I did offer pureed sweet potatoes and avacodo a couple times to DD, but she didn't like the texture of the food.  I probably didn't puree it enough for her.  And since she is only 7 months, she really isn't ready for anything but pureed.

    My brother's girlfriend got me "The Well Fed Baby" cookbook, but it seemed to have more recipes for older babies & toddlers, which I plan to try out once DD is really for more solids than puress.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I also used wholesomebabyfood.com.  In addition, I just mashed up some softer foods for DD.  Her first food was banana.  I just mashed it and gave it to her mixed with a little breastmilk for a couple days, then she got it without the breastmilk.  Same with avocado and squash, peas, mango, etc.  However, in defense of the jarred food (which I did give to DD sometimes), there are several companies which don't use fillers such as corn starch in their foods, such as Earth's Best, Growing Healthy and Beech Nut.  Also, depending on the particular product, Gerber doesn't fillers like corn starch either.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    "But don't think that babies only want bland food. My DD loves Indian food, and we had a slighlty spicy putanesca sauce the other night that she enjoyed so much she practcally ate her body weight."

    I don't want to overstress the spice thing, but I did want to add another funny story.  My DS hated avocado when we first tried it at 6 months old.  Avocado is actually a great first food since it has good fat and can be mashed to such a smooth consistency.  Wouldn't you know that when we spoon fed him some guacamole from a local Mexican restaurant at about 8 months old, he loved it - onions, tomatoes, jalapenos and all.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I agree with amy-lynn and Notanewbie.  DD loves all things spicy.  I gave her hummus recently, and she didn't really care for it.  Then I gave her the "spicy" hummus, and she loved it.  She kept dipping the same cracker in the hummus and licking it off.  She's a very bad "double-dipper".
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from canukgrl. Show canukgrl's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I made all DD's food too, and agree that you don't really need a cookbook (though some are interesting)  Just steam the heck out of whatever you choose and puree it to the desired consistency (dependant on age) and voila!  I did all kinds of meat, veg, fruit this way and as she got older would rely less on my frozen stash and tend more to throw some of what we were having into the blender/food mill (paying attention to salt and spice as others have noted)   I got a food mill as a hand-me-down that was awesome and easier to use than a blender or an inversion blender (in my opinion) and only about 30 bucks to buy new pretty much anywhere: http://www.kohls.com/upgrade/webstore/product_page.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524892549067&pfx=pfx_shopcompare&cid=shopping3&mr:trackingCode=C7D36BB3-76B7-DE11-93DB-0019B9C043EB&mr:referralID=NA

    Also I would do a big batch or two of whatever was on sale on a given week every other Sunday or so and freeze them in 8 oz containers - filling more as babies' appetite grew.  I tried the ice cube tray thing but honestly cleaning them was far too much hassle!  I would put 2-3 days worth in one container.

    I too am happy to answer any questions anyone might have... I'm a full time working mom and I can attest that it's a lot easier to do than you might think!
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from hellgirl. Show hellgirl's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I used http://www.wholesomebabyfood.com

    Excellent recipes, techniques, storage tips...and it was free.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kaydo. Show kaydo's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Ok, so the consensus seems to be www.wholesomebabyfood.com!  (I print all of my "grown-up" recipes from CooksIllustrated.com, so this is very much my style.) Thanks everyone!
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Oops, I forgot to mention this website/blog.  Thought I'd mention it since no one else has.

    http://weelicious.com/

    It tends to be a little on the nutty/crunchy side and is written by a mom. It's written in blog style with some great pictures.  Her son is older now, but there is a section of recipes for younger babies.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Jag,
    It is always good to read labels. However, as long as the fillers are natural, the companies can get by, by just labeling the jars "all natural". Unless it labeled "NO fillers", one will never know, what is in there.
    The larger well-known companies - that take 85% of this billion dollar business - mix their products with water and add fillers to make it thicker. This make their products less expensive than their newer competitors, but also inferior by cutting the nutrition.

    You may want to read this:
    http://www.cspinet.org/reports/cheat1.html
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Pingo, please give up the crusade.  We all know by now that you feel that making your own baby food is superior and that feeding jarred foods is far inferior.  The article you posted is from 1995, so a lot has changed since then.  In addition, that article states that Heinz and Gerber list some products as "all natural", and yet do add fillers.  However, those fillers would be listed under the ingredients if they were there.  For example, the article says that Heinz uses tapioca starch and it is listed as "tapioca" on the label.  That is all natural, but it's still a filler.  So, actually, that article actually illustrates that if you read the labels carefully, and look for foods that have JUST the actual fruits and vegetables, plus water listed on the labels, then you should not be giving your baby any unwanted fillers.  Whether the canning destroys some of the nutrients is another issue, but I submit that steaming or roasting the heck out of veggies and then freezing them also destroys some of the nutrients.  You are giving the impression, whether intentionally or not, that you think anyone who feeds jarred food is scarring their baby for life and doesn't care enough to do what's best for baby.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    am,
    I only quoted that article, because it was easy to reach on Google and because it is written in layman's terms. Easy to read and easy to understand.
    However, I am a researcher and read plenty of articles - scientific or otherwise. There are plenty of articles in regard to baby food backing up my belief, that home made baby food is better for baby. You can kind of compare it to a home cooked meal verse a TV-dinner.
    If you or anyone else believe jarred baby food measure up to your standards, I will not try to convince you otherwise. You all have right to your beliefs, as I have right to mine. My original post was to support mothers, that were interested in making their own.
    So your statement, "you think anyone who feeds jarred food is scarring their baby for life and doesn't care enough to do what's best for baby" is going a bit too far. Don't you think? Where did I state that, and how do you know, what I think?
    One more thing.  Don't you think, the baby food companies steam or roast the food prior to filling the jars and canning them? And btw. one does not need to steam and roast "the heck" out of fruit and vegetables, in order to cook them. I am sure you already know that.
    Done with this thread. Have a nice day!

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from kookenhaken. Show kookenhaken's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Kaydo, you don't say how old your baby is, but the important thing to remember about baby food is that it is primarily a "transitional" need until your child is ready to handle the types of food adults eat (provided, of course, those adults eat healthful foods! Maybe this is the time to look at what you're eating, too!).  If you wait until your baby is developmentally ready for solid foods,  you'll find that this transition moves pretty quickly and you save yourself a lot of effort.  You don't need to make huge vats of pureed foods.

    What I did with my kids was to adapt the foods I was cooking for myself and my husband.  I put  tender, unsalted cooked veggies through a hand-held ricer (carrots, peas, potato, sweet potato, etc). When we moved on to fruits, I mashed ripe banana, peach, mango, etc.  You can mix these with cereal if you want, once your baby has had both foods separately.   As far as meats go, if you wait a little longer until he/she is handling foods with more texture, you can chop tender meats finely and mix in a little soft veggies if you want.

    One mistake a lot of parents make is to keep their kids on baby food too long.  Watch for signs your baby is ready to move on to more textured foods and finger foods.  And, obviously, don't add salt, sugar, butter, etc. to your baby's foods. 

    I strongly recommend a great book by Ellyn Satter called "Child of Mine: Feeding with Love and Good Sense".  It will help you keep feeding issues in perspective. 

    By the way--I'm a Registered Dietitian! Enjoy your wonderful baby!
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    Kookenhagen,
    I thought, I was done with this thread. But I saw, this is your first post, so I wanted to welcome you to the boards.
    Good to get an input from a real food expert.


     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from SarahInActon. Show SarahInActon's posts

    Re: Cookbook for baby food?

    I also love weelicious, yay notanewbie.  The mom actually has two kids now, a new baby girl, and she is starting solids the mom has got some great purees on again.

    I saw a really gorgeous looking book at Williams Sonoma that they wrote themselves, did anyone else buy it?
     

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