Couple of Random BFing Questions....

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    I wonder if anyone can help me with these questions...

    1. Do you make all the breastmilk you are going to make for the day in the morning?  If I pump too much in the morning, will I run out or have much less for the evening?

    2. If you travel alone (without your baby) by plane, are you allowed to bring your pump and and pumped milk aboard as a carry on?

    TIA!
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    I don't know the first one, but re breast milk, this is from the TSA website.  It doesn't mention a pump, but if you're bringing breast milk on and they are complete idiots, I'm sure that would not cause a red flag.

    Declare larger liquids. Medications, baby formula and food, and breast milk are allowed in reasonable quantities exceeding three ounces and are not required to be in the zip-top bag. Declare these items for inspection at the checkpoint. Officers may need to open these items to conduct additional screening.

    Here is a link toTSA Prohibited Items
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    1) I think it's a supply and demand situation, so, no, you don't make it all in the AM, you will make more throughout the day.  That said, if you pump extra ("demand"), then it can take time for your body to adjust and make more ("supply").  It's individual how long it will take to build back up, but you're making it around the clock in response to how much is removed.

    2) You are allowed to do this, but there have been lots of issues for individuals because not all screeners will be familiar with how (and why) pumping works.  There have been many, many threads on the Somerville Moms yahoo group and some people have had zero problems and some people have had lots of problems.  It seems the general consensus is that traveling within the US generally works better and the screeners are more familiar with it.  People traveling internationally have had more variable experiences.  (Like getting stupid questions, like "if that's b-milk, then where's your baby??"  Uh... the baby isn't here; that's why I have to pump.  And, "Don't you know that they make formula for babies??")
    The general advice seems to be to call the specific airline to check their policies, and allow yourself plenty of extra time.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    OMG, and these are the people responsible for keeping us safe from terrorists?  I can't use the word I want to thanks to the BDC filter, but you can guess; any number of them will do.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from winter09wedding. Show winter09wedding's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    1- I would routinely pump or feed until "dry" and then be fine for my remaining pumps/feedings until about 12 months, when my supply diminished a bit.

    2- yes. technically. it works much better when you announce- really loudly- that you have the milk way before they get to your bags. I think that having the milk with the pump helped me with the "non-understanding individuals."  as an aside, depending upon the length of your flight (And the hour before, and the travel after) I actually found that traveling with frozen milk worked best, with the ice pack.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    I can't answer your questions specifically, but I've had no trouble bringing 2 sippy cups (with two toddlers) filled with (cow's) milk through security.  As others have said, I announce it as early in the process as possible.  Usually just taking it out of the diaper bag and holding it up so an agent can see it before I put it in one of the bins is sufficient.  A couple of times they've needed me to open them up and then they hold some kind of strip over the top (they never touch the cup once it's opened and the strip doesn't touch the cup or the milk) and then they spray the strip with something and tell me I can close the cups and be on my way.

    You should definitely leave extra time to go through security--and expect to be held up for a few extra minutes.  In my experience, the TSA agents have been kind and helpful--telling me to take my time, etc. and just to come over when I'm ready (I know that's not always the case).  When the kids were younger, I carried a copy of the rules from the TSA website with me just in case, but I never needed them. 

    These rules are not new anymore and I would HOPE that most of the agents are familiar with them and have dealt with all the scenarios--breast milk with or without kids in tow/bottles/sippy cups, etc.--and that this wouldn't be a big deal, and that if one agent were misinformed that one of the other agents would step in to correct them.  IF someone were to give you a hard time, I would very politely show the rules from the TSA site, and if they still give you a hard time, ask to speak to a manager/supervisor (being calm and polite, of course).  Hopefully the supervisor/manager-level agents are better-versed in the rules than the people they supervise. 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    Thanks ladies!  Kar - thanks for the link, I clicked through and it does specifically say that nursing mothers are allowed to bring breastmilk on board with or without thair infants.  Thanks!  I've been flying before with a nursing baby, but never without.  I think I might bag the trip though, that will be a lot of breastmilk if it's an overnight, and i'd rather not travel without my kiddos anyway.  It's just a social trip.

    Thanks for the thoughts on my first question too.  I've recently started pumping after DS's last feed because he's sleeping through the night and going to bed at an earlier hour.  I've noticed I get a lot less that these sessions then at my morning sessions and so it got me wondering.  
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    Speaking of travelling without kids, I am heading to Europe for a business trip in a few weeks for 8 days. DS#2 (4.5 months) is still only on BM. I have plenty of stash to keep him going for the whole time, but I am worried about my supply. Realistically, I can only see getting in 4 pumps a day. Anyone do something similar? How did your supply hold up? I will just be dumping what I pump as there's no way to store along the way. That will make me pretty sad. :(
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from dz76. Show dz76's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    While you do not make all your milk in the morning it is when your supply is the greatest.  It contains more water while in the evening your milk is contains more fat.  It's actually sort of interesting.  I could tell by sight what time containers of milk were pumped based on how much cream there was at the top of the bottle.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    Agree that supply is greatest in the mornings. I never noticed the fat thing through the day, but I know if I had a big steak the night before (or other fatty meals) I could see a difference the next day. 

    As far as pump and dump goes, 4 times a day may affect your supply a little, especially if you nurse frequently, but you should be able to increase it again once you return home - I don't know how easy it will be to try and keep the same number of pumpings as you have current feedings, especially if you are doing dinners etc. with business collegues. Good Luck!
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    Some random ramblings...

    Pumping in the morning will not diminish your supply later in the day, as others have already said.  In fact, empty breasts will refill, so you'll get more overall if you empty and then pump again later.  According to "my" LC, the evening (around dinner time) is when you produce the least and some professionals think that is part of why the evening tends to be the witching hour when babies get cranky.  When I was doing some bottle feedings in the early weeks, the LC suggested doing them then.

    When we flew this summer (with baby), TSA was very patient and accomodating.  Every time we went through security, they asked if I had liquid.  The second time, the guard reassured me that it would have been OK to bring formula on the plane. They couldn't seem to understand when I said I didn't need it, but I appreciated the gesture.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from LilSprout. Show LilSprout's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    WOW!  Interesting thread, especially re: fat content (I'll have to pay more attention!) and low-supply related to the witching hour...! 
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: Couple of Random BFing Questions....

    I think if I were taking a short trip and had to pump, I'd just dump the milk instead of brining it home.  I'd be worried about keeping it properly refrigerated in a carry on bag.
    You'd also avoid all the stupid "where's the baby" questions.  I think the exceptions about liquids for "reasonable" amounts of milk or formula are there so you can feed the baby on the plane.
    I know it's sad to dump - but I think it would be much easier and safer in the long run.
    Anyway - good luck and bon voyage!
     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share