Cranky kid - how best to respond

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from beniceboston. Show beniceboston's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    my damn stainless steel fridge isnt magnetic....i was debating a chalk board in the kitchen....not sure if thats a bad idea or not.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Benice - If DD is too young to help, is she interested in watching? Sometimes when DD wants attention while I am in the kitchen, I will pull out her step, or sometimes even the ladder (an extra special treat, since I try and keep her off it most of the time) and position her so she can watch what I am doing. I will explain what I am doing, and offer her tastes etc. to keep her attention (since I don't want her climbing down too much on her own). 
    I find this really helps the most when she is in her "up, mommy up!" type of attention seeking, which can be even worse than the "mommy, mommy, mommy" whine, because she will try and grab me to climb into my arms... really not safe when I am holding a knife or at the stove cooking. Who knew little kids could pull so darn hard?
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dz76. Show dz76's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    DH and and I always told childless friends after DD1 was born that it was like having a dog (which we have actually never had but in theory at least I think it's true).  You spend a lot of time saying things like "Stop", "Get off that", "Drop it" and "Don't eat that".  You also always want to show off the new tricks they've learned.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    benice -- she might be a little too young still, but I just bought my daughter a Melissa & Doug magnetic paper doll at Home Goods and she's obsessed with it. I bust it out at restaurants. We made it through happy hour at Deep Ellum without incurring any hipster wrath last Friday.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Yeah, that's right, I took my daughter to happy hour.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from purplecow89. Show purplecow89's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    One of the most important things a kid learns how to do is wait, reasonably quietly and politely, for adults to get to them.  It's a skill they'll need the rest of their lives, may as well start now.

    A kid nearly two can learn to understand, "I'll be with you when I finish doing X" and hang on a few minutes.  If you say it, then do it, they'll catch on to the fact that you are not Instant Mom and whining doesn't make you go any faster.  At that age you will have to hand them something to do, but by three or so you can tell them to find something to do themselves.

    Related is the call of "MomMomMomMom" from across the house by a child expecting you to drop whatever is in your hand (phone, pot of spaghetti, sibling) and come running, also to be discouraged unless someone is bleeding.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    benice -- this is the one I bought: http://www.amazon.com/Melissa-Doug-27-Piece-Ballerina-Magnetic/dp/B000IEBY3A/ref=pd_bxgy_t_img_c

    I think it was the same price at HG too. Hmph.

    She's SO into it. I remember loving paper dolls when I was little. Although now I can't remember why -- it doesn't seem like much fun.

    I wonder if colorforms are still fun. Do they make colorforms any more?
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Or you could say, "Go bang your head against a wall. Only boring people are bored."
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    What do you do when a 14 month old has a fit?  My DD has taken to flinging her head back and arching her back and crying if I take something away from her, etc.  For example, she had, what seemed to me, to be a fit at Roche Bros the other day because I took the 4 pack of Yobaby away from her so they could ring it up and bag it.  I calmly told her it'd be ok and she didn't need it.  She then got distracted by confiscating my credit card.  I don't want her to turn into one of those kids who are like, "give it to me and I'll stop my fit."  Thoughts?
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Well, to continue my dog-based advice, my dog trainer said that even your calm, quiet, collected sentence is attention for a fit and is not good.  Completely ignoring it, not even looking at her, is what she recommended...for our dog.  Is it different for humans?
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from beniceboston. Show beniceboston's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    In Response to Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond:
    benice -- this is the one I bought: http://www.amazon.com/Melissa-Doug-27-Piece-Ballerina-Magnetic/dp/B000IEBY3A/ref=pd_bxgy_t_img_c I think it was the same price at HG too. Hmph. She's SO into it. I remember loving paper dolls when I was little. Although now I can't remember why -- it doesn't seem like much fun. I wonder if colorforms are still fun. Do they make colorforms any more?
    Posted by lemonmelon


    ORDERED. And the Joey version that has different costumes. I've already ordered too much on amazon this week.

    Lemon, you hit one of my two current weaknesses - things to keep DD entertained...... the other is sugary/caffeinated substances.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    How do sugary/caffeinated substances help?  No judgment whatsoever in this question, just pure, unadulterated ignorance. :)
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    In Response to Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond:
    my damn stainless steel fridge isnt magnetic....i was debating a chalk board in the kitchen....not sure if thats a bad idea or not.
    Posted by beniceboston

    If you're nervous about kid eating chalk or the dust, just get the chalkboard for the magnets.  Chalkboards are magnetic.
    Is your dishwasher stainless steel too?  The dishwasher is probably magnetic.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from MM379. Show MM379's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Kar - I think they help mom.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Ohhh, of course!  Embarassed
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    We have one low cupboard that has nothing dangerous in it--just colanders and large bowls and tupperware.  This cupboard, however, is still childproofed.  I believe this is the trick.  Make them think they're getting away with something.  I make my daughter ask politely or I won't let her in the special cupboard.  Sometimes if she's extra-good, I'll hand her a spoon to mix. 

    We also listen to music while cooking and dance.  When Daddy comes home with the iPod she drags him to the stero to hook up the music and is quite happy dancing.

    Good luck!  Someone already posted that article about whining being the worst sound in the world.  It really is ugh. 
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Okay the animal escape posts scare me.  There I said it.

    Also, although this has nothing to do with the actual question, Kar, I oftentimes think of when I watched the dog whisperer and pretty much the solution to everything was to make sure that the dog was able to get out excess energy via a long walk.  I try to tire my kids out every day by making them play outside.  There's a lot to be said about the dog whisperer.  
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    In Response to Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond:
    We have one low cupboard that has nothing dangerous in it--just colanders and large bowls and tupperware.  This cupboard, however, is still childproofed.  I believe this is the trick.  Make them think they're getting away with something.  I make my daughter ask politely or I won't let her in the special cupboard.  Sometimes if she's extra-good, I'll hand her a spoon to mix. 
    Posted by lissafro

    We did this too! She can also put the tupperware away -- and unlike my husband she stacks it all nicely instead of just hucking it in there. And now I've started "letting" her help me with dinner -- she washes and dries the fruit and vegetables and sets the table. Today she got a little ornery about putting her toys away and I said that I would set the table instead of her, and she burst into tears and ran in to grab the placemats and napkins. Let's see how long that attitude lasts.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Lostgrouse - my dad has often joked that he could make a mint by rewriting the dogwhisper's books to refer to children instead of dogs. I don't think it is as crazy as it sounds.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Part of the reason the dog whisperer stuff translates so well to childrearing is because it's so focused on training the pet owner to be the alpha and be a good owner so as not to inadvertently train the dog to be a pain is the a.  If more people had "I just want avoid raising a huge pain in the a or a jerkface" as a parenting philosophy the world would be a better place haha. 
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    In Response to Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond:
    In Response to Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond : We did this too! She can also put the tupperware away -- and unlike my husband she stacks it all nicely instead of just hucking it in there. And now I've started "letting" her help me with dinner -- she washes and dries the fruit and vegetables and sets the table. Today she got a little ornery about putting her toys away and I said that I would set the table instead of her, and she burst into tears and ran in to grab the placemats and napkins. Let's see how long that attitude lasts.
    Posted by lemonmelon


    Lemon - can you remind me how old DD is?  I'm wondering how soon I can start doing this as well...
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from purplecow89. Show purplecow89's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    The dog people and the gal from Seaworld who wrote about training her husband with dolphin training tricks have the same basic idea--reward behavior you want, discourage and redirect behavior you don't want.  That works for very small children and for simple things (don't throw your dirty socks on the floor, put them in the basket)

    The limitation is that at some point a child needs to learn that there are reasons for things--not that you need to give them all the time, for every single thing, or that the kid needs to agree with them--but they need to understand that there are in fact reasons and the world does not consist of random ordering-about.  A dog doesn't care why it's not supposed to be on the couch.  A kid needs to learn what is dangerous, what is impolite, etc., and why, as their ability permits.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Cranky kid - how best to respond

    Funny!  I really was nervous to post my dog training tips here on how to stop attention "demanding" behavior, but glad I'm not the only one that thinks about the correlation!  And, we do have a very well behaved lab. :)
     
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