hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from beniceboston. Show beniceboston's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    cotton ball trick officially did not work today, I'll pick up some larger diapers tonight.... pingo the blowouts are because the baby is being breastfed and/or not on a solid food diet(more solids = solid bowel movement) and because I probably need to go up a size.

    you made it about what we are choosing to feed our babies and not about the fact that healthy infants do have loose stool and the fact that there are many different styles/sizes of diapers available.... your comment was rather offensive to people who use formula or buy jarred baby food.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    benice--you forgot to add that it was offensive to those of us who do in fact need to work, thereby (according to pingo) sacrificing the health and well-being of our children for convenience sake.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Pingo--while the official American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation for solid food is 6 months, and while this is standard practice (based on what friends there tell me) in Europe, my pediatrician, and most of my friends' pediatricians give the "ok" for solid food at 4 months.  We held off until 5 months b/c my twins just weren't ready before that and even then we had a couple of false starts.  DS adjusted quickly and couldn't get enough.  DD really didn't  get on board with solids until about 6 1/2 or 7 months when I introduced yogurt.  There are some kids that do great with solids at 4 months and some who still really aren't ready at 6 months.  As with everything, there is a big window for what's normal.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    I am not even involved in this discussion and my kids are in elementary school now, but I sort of feel like defending Pingo.  I happened to read this thread and was quite surprised at the angry, defensive reactions to her post, particularly where most the responders seem to be nursing anyway.  It might seem slightly insulting, but I really saw it as a suggestion as to what could be causing it.  If that doesn't apply, why go nuts over the suggestion?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from beniceboston. Show beniceboston's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    haha yes kiwi, thank you. I'm trying to be productive here at work but am also compelled to keep posting!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

        There are, however a lot of infants 4 months to 8 months who are introduced to foods when they may enthusiastically eat them, but when their digestive systems cannot handle them,  and the response of most nurses and doctors I know  to a parental complaint of explosive runny stools at this age  would be to ask:

     1. Have you introduced foods, and what kind?

     2. Whenever baby is not feeding directly from the breast,  are bottles and nipples sterilized in boiling water after washing?   As both bacteria and the slightest trace of any soap residue causes explosive runny stools, these are common causes of the problem.  (Dishwasher clean is not adequate for infants to age about 8 months.)

        I finally went back to parts of this thread I had not read before,  and cannot understand why a few of you blew up on Pingo for asking perfectly logical questions.

       Some of you responded as though she had said - you stupid mothers what is wrong with you? I am so superior to you.

         When in fact, she only asked very relevant questions,  and cited her own experience.    Why so much hostility  and sarcasm  toward her?
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from beniceboston. Show beniceboston's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Pingo didn't ask what we were feeding - she assumed that it must be what we are feeding our babies and that we must be sacrificing what is best for our babies based on what was convenient for us.

    That is all I have to say about this before we really go on this for too long. Over and Out.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Scorpio75. Show Scorpio75's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    I am still TTC but will pop over here to try to get a feel of what is to come.  And I have to say that to me (and apparently others) thought Pingo's post was very condescending this is a prime example
    "Of course, the food I gave them was all made at home." She might as well have said I fed my children homemade food and not matter what you feed you child it is crap because it is not my home made food.

    I shouldn't be shocked Pingo does tend to have what reads to me and I believe others as very condescening attitutde to anything that is not done the way "she did it", be it babies or weddings posibbly other things too but I only bump in to her on those boards.

    Sometimes she has something helpful and does just offer a suggestion nothing more nothing less and they can be valuable, but not often. I often wonder if I should just put her on ignore.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from happy2bpg. Show happy2bpg's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution


    Scorpio said exactly what I was feeling "I shouldn't be shocked Pingo does tend to have what reads to me and I believe others as very condescening attitutde to anything that is not done the way "she did it", be it babies or weddings posibbly other things too but I only bump in to her on those boards."


    Pingo --   Sorry but it's true and it's why I stopped posting on the wedding boards a long time ago.  I have enough drama in my life as it is, I don't need it on a message board where I go for help and advice.  I was sick of saying something and having people go up one side of you and down the next.   I have found this parent board to be amazingly supportive, positive and informative and I have made some great "friends" , all without any drama!
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy!
    Are you new mothers really THAT sensitive and stressed out?
    Never did I insinuate, that working mothers sacrifice the health and well-being of their children for convenience sake. Where in the world, did that come about? Just because you need to work, doesn't mean you have to be feeling guilty about it. Most young mothers have to work.
    Never did I did I tell you what to feed your babies and when to start feeding solids.
    And kiwigirl: I have to say that usually my day's most ridiculous comments come from my middle school students, but pingo's takes the cake today! Please explain, why my comment was so ridiculous. I was only commenting on what worked for me, not what I thought YOU should do.
    I still feel, just like everything else commercially made, that baby food in jars do have some additives, that could be harmful to some babies.

    As a note. My niece, who has twins (now a year old) had lots of food problems with them (one of them loose bowels), when she started to feed  them solids. When - on advice from her pediatrician - she switched to all home made food, the problems went away. To cook and mash a potato or carrot, takes less time, than running to the store and pick up a jar.



     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

       Then again, maybe she meant -  since hers was made at home, she cannot speak about standard brands or blends or additives.   Nowhere does she make any claim hers is superior.  That is all projection from readers.  She just gave a matter of fact description.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kaydo. Show kaydo's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Or it could just be that most of us can't quite understand why someone whose children are 32 and 34 feels the need to be on a forum about Infants & Toddlers.  (Or weddings...)
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Or it could just be that most of us can't quite understand why someone whose children are 32 and 34 feels the need to be on a forum about Infants & Toddlers.  (Or weddings...)

    kaydo I can tell you. When you have a 32 and a 34 year old - they get married. And after they get married, they have children. That is usually the way the world turns.
    So even though they are not babies with "blow outs" any longer, these threads are quite relevant.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Pingo--if you read baby food labels you'll see that the ingredient lists are very short.  If you buy baby applesauce, the ingredients are apple puree, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and water.  I have yet to come across a "single ingredient" food that has more than the main food and water and occasionally, vitamin C added.  The jars with more than one ingredient are similar, with 2 or 3 main ingredients and water listed.  There may have been a time that baby food was laced with all kinds of nasties, but my experience is that this is not the case anymore.  When I go to the grocery store, I usually pick up about 50 jars or more of baby food (I have twins and they are at my mother's 2 days/week, so I buy enough to send to her house as well).  I have, on occasion, made food for them if I wanted them to try something not available in jars (i.e. avocados) or we just didn't have it on hand at the time (i.e. bananas).  There are several foods that are high in nitrates (carrots, beets, many others) that can actually cause deadly illness (blue baby syndrome) and it is not recommended that parents prepare these at home for infants under 8 months.  Baby food companies get these foods from suppliers who grow the veggies in soil low in nitrates and then test them for nitrate levels before sending them out for consumption.  Even reputable DIY baby food sites such as wholesomebabyfood.com place strong warnings against homemade carrots etc. for infants below the "magic" age when their digestive systems are able to process the nitrates like adults.  But to my original point, it takes me 5 minutes to pick up 50+ jars of baby food.  It would take much longer than that to prepare a week or two's worth of baby food to freeze for later use.

    Now...all the above being said, I do not buy baby food meat.  I am a vegetarian although DH is not.  DH and I have both agreed that he will buy organic meat and prepare that for them at home since we both have misgivings about factory farming and the way animals are raised for food in this country.  Just looking at the baby food jars of pureed meat turns my stomach--although I realize that they're probably fine and I'm hypersensitive to it b/c of being a vegetarian (looking at non-pureed meat also grosses me out).

    When my kids are awake, I want to spend as much time with them as possible.  When they're asleep, there are so many other things to get done around the house, errands to run, catching up on our own sleep, etc., that it's very hard to fathom making time to make a week or two's supply of baby food to freeze on top of that.

    I am hoping, once they start staying up later (they crash at 6:30 and that's it), that we can start eating meals as a family every night and they can have a kid-friendly version (i.e. pureed spaghetti and sauce--yum) of whatever we're having.  As it is now, we get home around 5 or 5:30, have about 15 minutes to play with them, then it takes 30 minutes or so to feed them, and then (depending on how late it is) another 10 - 15 minutes of play time and 30 minutes to change them, have a story or two, and a bottle before bed.  If we had to add in making our own dinner and pureeing it for them, we'd have no quality time with them, and they'd be asleep before dinner was ready. 

    Everyone has to choose their priorities.  I believe that my kids (and millions of others) are getting adequate nutrition from the baby food jars, and don't feel compelled to sacrifice time with them to re-invent the wheel. 


     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from austengirl. Show austengirl's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Daisy
    I eat meat and babyfood meat in jars turn me off - yick!  I find wet dog food more appetizing ;)
    So in lieu of that what do you feed your babies for protein and iron?  I am very curious.  Thanks.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Daisy, I read you very well. In no way do I criticise mothers, that feed their babies from a jar. I made my own baby food, because it was easier for me and because I felt it was better for my babies. My niece started to make her own babyfood, when her twins did not take well to the jared food. Everyone has right to do, what they think is right for them.
    However, there just has to be some preservatives in baby food in jars. They are on regular shelves (for how long, we don't know), not in the refrigerated or frozen section. One does not know exactly, what the manufacturers put in the food. They only have to list it, if it is over a certain limit. Some babies may have a problem with some of those additives. That was my point. Peace!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from TownPC. Show TownPC's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    I had to change brands with my little one (now 23 months) because of blowouts/ leaks. Once I settled with huggies, I knew it was time to increase sizes when it started happening again!
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    However, there just has to be some preservatives in baby food in jars. They are on regular shelves (for how long, we don't know), not in the refrigerated or frozen section.

    Pingo:  Not true.  Baby food in jars uses essentially the same process the home canning does.  Did you ever make homemade jarred tomato sauce, homemade pickles, etc. using a pressure canning process?  Many home cooks do and it does not require preservatives. Additionally, there are expiration dates in baby food like most other food products you find at the grocery store so they do not sit on shelves indefinitely.  Finally, there are organic, preservative-free frozen and refridgerated food in addition to jar food. You don't really have any idea of what you're talking about.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Austengirl--my babies are only 9 months old so the majority of their nutrition comes from breastmilk and formula still.  In addition, they LOVE yogurt, so a fair amount of protein comes from that (they each get one container/day on average).  Don't forget that fruits and vegetables also have protein in them and some vegetables are high in iron as well.  We'll probably start to introduce tofu and beans in the near future too--as they start to rely less on milk and formula.  Beans, of course, are high in both protein and iron.  Our pediatrician told us that if we were planning to give them meat, we should introduce by about 9 months--which is what we're doing.  They're not crazy about chicken yet, and we're not terribly concerned by that.  They've had no exposure to meat while I was pregnant or from my breastmilk, so it's a very different taste to them.  In the end, if they like it, great, if they don't, we weren't planning to serve it at every meal nor have it be the main focus of their meals anyway.  As they start to get teeth, it will be easier to give them pieces of chicken or tofu (or other meat) as finger foods to make it more "fun."  The main key as they get older is to encourage them to eat a wide variety of foods so that they aren't dependent on meat for protein or iron. 

    Pingo--I agree there must be some sort of preservative, however they all have an expiration date, so it isn't like Twinkies.  I suspect that there are fairly heavy regulations about what's allowed and not in baby food.  Earth's Best and Gerber both have organic food available, so those brands probably have lower preservative levels than others (I use Beech-nut which is not organic, but that is a story for another day). 
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Ok...after reading Notanewbie's post, I went an looked at some of the jars I have in my kitchen.  They all said "no artificial additives, preservatives or colors" so she's probably right about the canning process.  As long as it goes into the jar sterile and is sealed quickly using sterile methods, it shouldn't need preservatives.  They even have the little pop-up dimple thing so that you can tell if it's contaminated with botulism or other beasties.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    I really researched this extensively before we began solids.  I'm a working mom who has homemade about 75% of my son's food, but the other 25% was primarily jarred food with some frozen foods mixed in.

    There are a couple of different processes for preserving baby food: 1) a manufacturer can add preservatives, but this is becoming less and less of an issue as parents demand healthier options, 2) ultra heat treatment which kills a lot of nutrients and vitamins and is not used much in this counry and 3) vacuum or pressure canning without preservatives. 

    I look at all the labels on stuff I feed my baby and the major brand jarred food that I used (Gerber, Beechnut and Earth's Best) did not use preservatives.  I did mainly buy the organic versions so I can't say with 100% certainty that there isn't a brand out there that does use chemicals, but I've never seen one.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Daisy -Ok...after reading Notanewbie's post, I went an looked at some of the jars I have in my kitchen.  They all said "no artificial additives, preservatives or colors" so she's probably right about the canning process.  As long as it goes into the jar sterile and is sealed quickly using sterile methods, it shouldn't need preservatives.  They even have the little pop-up dimple thing so that you can tell if it's contaminated with botulism or other beasties.
     -----------------
         This means that as long as the additive was extracted from a natural product,  and not one that the government requires be disclosed, or in lower quantity than must be disclosed, they can add it.

         So if the production of cornbread somewhere in their factories yields extra corn oil, and the taste testers at Babyfoods Are Us Kitchens determine that with 1.98% added corn oil, and 1.99% of beef fat skimmed from making  low fat gravy, plus a small percentage of beet juice for color,  plus the natural preservative ε-Polylysine (see link below)  which prevents bacterial and mold growth,   is a tasty and healthy product which allows them to use 4% less expensive meat, and boosts the shelf life from the 9-12 months of sterile canning methods to a full 2.5 years

    manufacturers can and do do it any time they want to.  Any product that does not say 100% Pure, no additives, they can.  And if they want to add 8% beef fat to beef, they can still call it 100% Pure, no additives  because what they added comes from beef like the babyfood.
       But that 2% to 8% fat can act as a super laxitive for some babies, not others.

    Some makers never do this.  Most do.  If you add sugar to babyfood, you have to label it.  If you add a small quantity of super-sweet apple concentrate,  or beets, as a natural coloring agent, you can sell more food to parents of babies who like sweets, legally, and never say it (except not claim it as 100% pure beef).
    And the meat will be a richer brown, not pasty like overboiled pureed beef  with fat supplements.  Yum, Yum.

    I remember the scandal in the nineties, when numerous bread and cereal and cracker makers were advertising "High in natural fiber!"  and people found out that the cellulose fiber added, 5-7 percent of some breads by weight,
    was clean, washed and boiled, sawdust.   So our legislators put an end to that - now only 3-5 % or whatever sawdust is allowed.

    Know what?  A kid who is allergic to maple syrup, can have a bad reaction to sawdust from a maple wood.   But when added to Jr or baby carrots, which are made of a significant amount of cellulose themselves,  babyfood that says no artificial ingredients can slip in a few percent of veg. cellulose  in the form of sawdust, or celery pulp left from making soup, or lots of other things.

    Natural preservatives:
     http://natural-preservative.com/
    from a company that makes them.

    Pingo has been around long enough to have followed this issue for 30+ years since her children were born, and I am sure has a grandmotherly interest in such things.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Pingo, I don't want to add to the negativity too much, but there is a trend here.  People constantly tell you that your posts are harsh and offensive, but you do nothing to improve the situation.  You are allowed to be who you are, but if you continue to post the way that you do, you will continue to receive the responses that you do.  That's all there is to it.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Notanewbie. Show Notanewbie's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    I don't know why I bother, but let me add that although Whatawag is generously defending Pingo and is technically correct that "as the additive was extracted from a natural product,  and not one that the government requires be disclosed, or in lower quantity than must be disclosed, they can add it", the food labeling act actually requires that ingredient lists must contain all additives, preservatives and colorings, regardless of whether they are natural or not (example: "INGREDIENTS: Dried Bananas, Sugar, Salt, and Ascorbic Acid to Promote Color Retention"). If they have added "natural flavor" they must still declare that on the ingredient list, and yes, they can call it "100% natural".  It is actually required by law that trace ingredients be listed if they serve a function (such as preservation) in the food item.

    If you are looking to bore yourself to tears you can read the full food lavbeling law from the FDA at
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/FoodLabelingNutrition/FoodLabelingGuide/default.htm
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: hmm, possible diaper blowout solution

    Look...I ate raw hot dogs when I was growing up (who woulda thunk then that I'd be a vegetarian later on!?) and somehow I've managed to survive to adulthood.  I'm talking about not-necessarily-kosher, raw, full-size hot dogs straight out of the package in the fridge.  I ate bologna sandwiches for lunch for years and all kinds of deli meats and cold cuts.  All of those things are LOADED with nastiness, and, again, I survived.  I also ate store-bought, CANNED vegetables, not fresh--even in the summer and fall--and survived.  What it all comes down to is that I'm not hyper-concerned about a few preservatives (if, in fact there are) in my kids' food.  If I were to make the baby food myself, more than likely the pesticides would be worse than the preservatives.

    I have a degree in biochemistry, and, as a vegetarian, am reasonably aware of nutritional issues and make educated decisions about the food I eat and the food I provide to my kids.  I'm not completely ignorant of what certain nasties can do in one's body, but it's a matter of picking and choosing what I'm willing to live with.

    Frankly, if something added to the food prevents the growth of bacteria and mold that could cause a serious infection and potentially kill my child, I'm all for it.  You can argue about long-term effects, etc. but I grew up eating a fair amount of highly-processed foods, and I'm still here.  And if someone wants to hide beet juice in meat, my thought on that is "go ahead--it's healthier than the meat itself."  I might even try doing that later on when my kids won't eat their vegetables.

    I have no recollection of the scandal you're referring to w/the sawdust and was a teenager/young 20s during the 90s, so it's something I probably would've been aware of if I had heard about it.  Do you happen to have a citation?  (I'm not trying to be snarky--I am genuinely curious that I missed something like that.)

    The bottom line is that unless one is entirely self-sufficient--growing their own vegetables and fruit, raising their own meat, drinking 100% pure, uncontaminated water, etc. it's impossible to avoid ALL of the pesticides and chemicals that end up in our food supply.  And even then, there are those that argue that cooking food turns certain natural chemicals within the food into poison.  You can't win.  Eat a reasonably healthy, well-balanced diet.  Buy organic and/or locally-grown when it makes sense, and don't flip out if the candy bar you're eating is less than 60% cocoa and has a few tablespoons of white sugar (or, gasp, high fructose corn syrup) in it.  Make educated choices and decide what you can live with and what you can't.  Or, become entirely self-sufficient on virgin land covered in a bubble to protect it from acid rain.
     

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