Is 16 months too young to potty train?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    True, all those things contribute, but kids take with them what is instilled into their psyches at home and rely on those the most.  Arguably, the earlier and more deeply the habit is instilled the less likely it is to be abandoned for any reason. 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    I completely agree.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from fzas. Show fzas's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    Both of my daughters were potty trained before 2 years old.  Children should be trained to use a toilet in a bathroom.  When I have witnessed those who bring potties into kitchens, living rooms, etc, I am left wondering what the issue is with the parent.  So many parents over think this subject.  It is not rocket science.  Associate going to the toilet in a bathroom; period.  Although I am sure no child is left confusing locations for use, I for one do not appreciate eating in the same room as someone has relieved themselves.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from hellgirl. Show hellgirl's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    We've had a potty for our daughter since she took off in Babies R Us and picked one out on her own at 16 months. She doesn't use it now as anything more than a step-stool (it converts) to brush her teeth, but she does ask us to put the seat onto our own toilet where she'll sit each night before her bath and sometimes actually potty.

    Talk to your pediatrician. Your child may be more ready to start because of the influence of others in daycare, but remember, even at age two, you'll be in the bathroom with her to help her in and out of clothes, training pants (if you choose to use them) and of course, to ensure that she wipes properly.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from hellgirl. Show hellgirl's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    Wow. I should have read through all of the comments here...

    Our daughter isn't even two and when she's sick, she tries to make it to the bathroom to vomit! We think it's because her memory is like a steel trap (God help us) and she knows that when she starts to throw up, that where we take her. Now, she just tries to do it on her own.

    If she wants to use the toilet, she'll approach one of us and say, "Pee-potty-poop?" and then walk into the bathroom and stand at the adult toilet.

    I had never heard of leaving a training potty in any other room of the house but the bathroom until re-reading the responses here, nor have I ever seen it done. I guess if it works for the family, whatever...but I'm in the camp that says that going to the loo is done in the loo, not the kitchen or living room.

    FWIW: Purell is not allowed in our house. Hand sanitizers and the craze surrounding them, along with anti-bacterial cleansers, are just over the top ridiculous. Well, in my opinion (founded after researching pros and cons from the APA, AMA and NEJM).
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/09/science/09conv.html

    Read under Question 3

    Q. WASH YOUR HANDS? DON’T DOCTORS AUTOMATICALLY DO THAT?

    A. National estimates are that we wash our hands 30 to 40 percent of the time. Hospitals working on improving their safety records are up to 70 percent. Still, that means that 30 percent of the time, people are not doing it.

    And I know from experience, It's true.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    On sanitizers and gloves-
    Sanitizers have all these claims, we kill a gazillion kinds of bacteria and viruses.  But if you look at the research and their own manufacturer's fine print:  The liquid or wipes must coat the surface entirely, as they depend on contact,  and be left undisturbed 15 seconds to a minute, depending on both brand and kind of microbe.  No brand kills everything it says it does in less than 30 seconds.

    Ever see anyone use them, coat thoroughly then stand and wait?  Put on hand cream and watch a second hand, waiting 30 to 60 seconds  after it is completely on.   Nobody does it regularly, that I have ever seen.

    That is before you get into issues with increasing the resistance to antibiotics through casual overuse.

    Kids whose mommies use them on Mom and the child after toileting where there is no sink,  don't do it.  They get in the habit of not washing.

    Dentists, Doctors and technicians often put on gloves.  These protect them.  So they see no need to wash,  and go patient to patient with the same set of gloves, spreading what is on the outside of gloves from patient to patient.  Many nurses too.

    Just plain washing would have been better for the doctor and patient 90% of the time.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from mlhf. Show mlhf's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    Its so sad to see moms hating on moms.  Whatever works for you, do it!
    I'm really sorry, but this statement "I don't need to have kids to know it's possible to do the inconvenient, difficult thing all the time in the name of being responsible, GOOD parents" is off base.  It isn't possible all the time.  We're all just doing the best we can.  I am the oldest of 3, took care of my siblings who were much, much younger, babysat for infants, etc. So I thought I knew what being a parent would be like, but I was very surprised.  So, wait until you have kids of your own before you start wagging your finger.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from SarahInActon. Show SarahInActon's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    I agree with mlhf.  Since the age of 11, I used to take care of oodles of kids in quite a variety of situations from all the way from mom's helper to live in nanny and school aide and boy did I think myself an expert.

    And when DS was born, what a rude awakening!  My 18 years of so-called experience was out the window in a flash. All those old sayings apply, walk a mile in someone's shoes, takes one to know one.

    As a latecomer to these boards, does wags and kargiver have kids of their own?  Just curious, don't mean to incite anything by asking.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Kiwiguy. Show Kiwiguy's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    Ok. I usually don't get too concerned about anonymous people writing rubbish on internet forums, but as possibly the only guy reading this, I admit I take a little offense (maybe more than a little) and I want to respond to the unqualified comment posted above by WhatawagSBNy:

    "A major reason that men's rest room lines move so fast at public events?  Even stall users  walk by the sinks half the time or more."

    I'm to go out on limb here and suggest I am more informed about what goes on in a mens restroom at public events than WhatawagSBNy. This is based on the fact that everytime I use a restroom at a public event it is the MENS room, and I'm going to hazard a guess that I will not be seeing WhatawagSBNy in there.

    Why do the lines move faster? Well, the ratio of urinals to stalls is usually about 15 to 1. Most guys in these situations prefer to have a quick number one and hold number two until we get home. This is for a variety of reasons, one of which ironically is because we don't want to wait in a long line like our wives are forced to. Speaking from the male perspective, I can inform you all that using a urinal is designed to be a very quick process.

    So combine the facts that there are so many urinal's and the actual "act" itself is pretty quick, and you have the basis of a quick restroom visit. This does not however support the uninformed suggestion that "half or more" of men using the restroom go waltzing out the door without washing their hands. I use these restrooms when at public events, and I can tell you from some 30 (grudgingly closer to 40) years experience that most men use the sinks for their intended purpose. That is not to say that ALL men wash their hands, but I'm going to hazard a guess that all of you ladies have seen other ladies leaving a restroom without washing either. In fact, I sometimes wonder if there is a peer pressure thing going on, because if the restroom is busy, a guy knows everyone else will see him walking out if he doesn't wash his hands. Mind you - this doesn't phase the guy who walked in finishing a hotdog with one hand and holding a fresh beer in the other. But he is not the "typical guy" in my experience.

    So please, make your relevant comments here, but leave the uninformed hyperbole out of it, particularly when it doesn't really add anything at all to the original point of the thread.

    I am now stepping down from the soapbox to get back to work.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    Kiwiguy -
       My hubby, downstairs neighbor, and Dad must go to different venues.  They see a far greater number go from urinl atraight out, or urinal, to comb hair with a cob wet at the faucet, then out without washing.  Maybe 3 health professionals just notice more.
    They were complaining the other night- put off that the guy who just used a urinal and walked past the sink was right there at the grill , picking up lettuce and tomato slices and putting them on burgers.

        Check CDC website - their surveys, taken from Public health data when Health Inspectors stake out restrooms  for restaurants,  hospitals, and some other food related and health related things, shows a variable 40 to 65%, of men, depending on area and facility.  Roughly 25% lower than the women at the same facilities.   School data is worse.

       Provonost who was working on handwashing at hospitals, is not the only one.  Where I worked night nursing shifts near my old home, the roof blew off when Nursing Quality control people (whom all nurses knew were in the hospital) not surprisingly, saw most nurses M or F washed 100% of time when observed, after their own rest room use.  But up to 60% of other staff, not knowing they would be watched and data logged, did not. 

    These are stats you can check.  It is awful.  Maybe you hang out with a cleaner group of people.    Wish it were not true.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Kiwiguy. Show Kiwiguy's posts

    Re: Is 16 months too young to potty train?

    Not to beat a dead horse, but are you still implying this is just a guy thing - not washing hands?

    Aside from that, with all due respect, I think we do run in different crowds. I can not recall any time in recent memory seeing a guy wet his comb at a public sink to comb his hair, not that there is anything wrong with that. I don't even know any guys that carry a comb with them. Seriously.

    Although I must admit most of the public events I attend are sporting related, who would have thought the guys in my industry (engineering and construction) are better hand washers than those in healthcare based on my experiences and your health industry sources?

    At your suggestion I took a look at the CDC statistics which conclude that across the country, 75% of all men wash, compared to 90% of women. That is not a great number, but I take you back to your original statement:

    "A major reason that men's rest room lines move so fast at public events?  Even stall users  walk by the sinks half the time or more."

    Maybe you could have more accurately said "up to a quarter of men don't wash their hands, according to observational surveys conducted by the CDC".

    One last interesting note inthe CDC survey data, assuming you read it;

    "Observers discreetly watched and recorded whether or not adults using public restrooms washed their hands. Observers were instructed to groom themselves (comb their hair, put on make-up, etc.) while observing and to rotate bathrooms every hour or so to avoid counting repeat users more than once. Observers were also instructed to wash their hands no more than 10 percent of the time."

    We have resolved who your husband, father and/or downstairs neighbor saw combing their hair in a public restroom!!! I feel much better now, knowing this back and forth wasn't a waste of time.
     

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