New Safety Guidelines

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from June08bride. Show June08bride's posts

    New Safety Guidelines

    Im interested to know how you feel about the new car seat safety guidelines.  Im divided in a big way about it because I know I obviously want my children to be as safe as possible, but Im not sure how practical some of it is.  When my DD turned 1, she was 32 inches long and 24lbs....her knees were up at her chest in her convertible seat so how would that have been safe for her nevermind her being super uncomfortable.  I wish they didnt use pounds as their standard guidelines and also took height into the equation as well.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from rhm327. Show rhm327's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    You can always ask your pediatrician their thoughts.
    I'm okay with the guidelines since ds is not above average in height and is just 12.5 months. We'll see what I think when he's 19 months and looking more squished...
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from CoffeeQueen. Show CoffeeQueen's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    June, I'm with you. My DS is 31 inches and 24.5 lbs....and he'll be 9mos on the 3rd.  I know he's uncomfortable facing the backseat as it is and I'm torn on whether to flip him around in July when he turns 1. :/
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from marriedmom. Show marriedmom's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    Sorry b/c I don't mean at all to be contrary about this, but if your baby is heavy that is even more reason to keep him rear-facing. The benefit of rear-facing is that it lessens the chance of a serious spinal injury. All babies and toddlers, regardless of weight have weaker necks than older kids.

    My son, who's now 4, RF'd till his second birthday. I insisted on keeping him that way even though my DH was reluctant specifically b/c he was heavy and had a bit of a melon head LOL.

    So please think of your bigger kiddos as being even more in need of head/neck protection! I know forward facing is a milestone a lot of people look forward to. It will come, and then they'll never stop kicking the back of your seat. Delay it!
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from June08bride. Show June08bride's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    IPW is right, Im not concerned about her weight, Im concerned about her length.  She is always coming in at +99% at all her check ups.  In all seriousness if you are putting them in the carseat the correct way, they shouldn't have much wiggle room with the straps.  I dont understand why all guidelines are always based on weight and not both weight and height.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    In Sweden the guideline is 4 years.  They can sit cross-legged.  Yes, they may break a leg in an accident, but what's worse?  I broken leg or a broken neck?  Personally, I'm going to keep mine rear facing as long as possible. 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    My DD is almost 3 and she weighs just about nothing (she's been under 5th percentile for weight since 6 months), but she has LONG legs (which is a real problem when trying to purchase pants, but that's another issue).  Because she didn't meet the weight requirement for turning her around, she remained rear facing until she was 2.5 years old.  She always just sat either cross legged or dangled her legs/feet on the sides of the seat.  Kids are naturally very flexible and will choose to sit cross legged or with knees bent anyway, so it's not at all uncomfortable for them.  Also, she didn't know any different, so it's not as if she was thinking how much better it would be if she were forward facing.  And in the case of an accident I'd much, much rather she had broken legs than a broken neck.  I think it's often simply the parents perception that the child is uncomfortable, not the reality.  With DS now on the way, we plan to keep him rearfacing until past his 2nd birthday, regardless of how much he weighs or how tall he is. 
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from dz76. Show dz76's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    I will admit to being to parent who moved her child to front facing at 11 months.  DD was larger both height and weight wise that the average 2 y/o at that point and we had to take the car seat out for some reason and I didn't see the point on reinstalling it rear facing for just a few weeks.  And DD was in 4T clothes at 2.  I can't even fathom how she would have fit rear facing.

    My 6 month old DS is almost 20 lbs right now and ~30 inches.  I can't even guess how big he will be at 1 year.  Let alone how tall.  6 month DD is smaller and more delicate.

    I will keep them rear facing as long as I can but once they are with in an inch of the top of their convertible seats (which DS was in at 4 months and DD was in at 5 months because they were too big for the infant seats) they will get moved which given how long they are will probably be at around a year.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    This is a stellar example of why that minivan with the swivel captain's chairs is going to make a killing.  Is that the Odyssey?  
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    Most convertible carseats can hold kids up to 40" tall (give or take, since it's one inch from the top of the carseat, so if you have a long-legged, short torsoed child, they may fit in the seat .  Most children, even exceptionally tall ones, are well under that past 40 inches, and if your child has a long torso, then it may be slightly under 40 inches) threshold at 2 years old.

    And yes, Lostgrouse, I do believe that's the Odyssey.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from canukgrl. Show canukgrl's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    I'm mixed about the new guidelines... of course I want my kids to be as safe as possible, but it is such a pain to have them rear facing!  DH and I are both tall and the passenger seats in our cars are not confortable when there is a rear facing seat - mainly an issue for long rides, but an issue nonetheless

    DD stayed rear facing until she was about 18 months - she was only 18 lbs at a year though quite tall.  We just left her rear facing until we bought a new car and had to move the seat anyway.  DS is coming up on 20lbs already and the infant carrier is quickly becoming impractical, so he will be moving to a rear facing convertible once the weather warms up... not sure what we'll do with him, my guess is that we'll leave him RF until next spring
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    Try telling a 10-year old that he needs to go back into a booster seat for an inch.  I don't think I will be doing this.  The seatbelt fits him the correct way.  He's been tall enough by the other guidelines for about a year and a half.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    That one has a card table option too, right?  This will spawn the next generation of World Poker Tour kids.  That's why they're doing this you know...
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from marriedmom. Show marriedmom's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    Oh, yes, sorry if I wasn't clear. I understand that height is a concern and people worry about legs being cramped, I just wanted to make the point that sometimes those bigger kiddos really need the protection, making it worthwhile to leave them RF even if they have to sit cross-legged. Kids legs and joints are very flexible, and what looks uncomfortable to us often isn't to them. Everybody knows their kid best, of course, and if you have one who *really* is uncomfortable RFing I know that makes it hard, but I would delay it as long as possible.

    Plus, like I said, it helps delay the inevitable seat-kicking!;)
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from dz76. Show dz76's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    My DD was AWEFUL about kicking the seat.  Actually it was more like leg presses. :-) 
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from LiveLoveLearnEnjoy. Show LiveLoveLearnEnjoy's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    I'm mixed on this one.  I totally intend to keep DS rearfacing as long as possible.  He is somewhere in the middle with his height (27 inches @ 6 months) but my daughter who just turned 12 would not have lasted in a booster seat until she was 10 to 12.  40 lbs seems like a lot.  I don't remember my daughter weighing that until like 4 or 5.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    I kept DD rearfacing until very recently (she is 28months old.) She turned 2 in November, but I knew we had a long car trip planned for Christmas, and felt that it would be safest to keep her rear-facing. We turned her forward probably late February. Mainly because she is also potty training, and had an accident, so the whole seat had to come out and be washed, so we installed it forward facing. Honestly, even though she isn't a seat kicker (yet), I miss having her rear-facing. I am having a devil of a time tightening the straps on the seat now that she is forward facing. It was a little tough when she was rear facing, but practically impossible now. We have a Sunshine Kids Radian seat. Anyone else have any issues like that? Or any tips on adjusting the straps? It is a front adjust seat, so it has the adjustment strap hanging down below where the crotch buckle is.

    Oh- and as for boosters until 4 foot 8 inches, my mother would never have gotten out of a booster. She claimed to be 4'8", but was really more like 4'7 3/4" in stocking feet. Tongue out
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    This is what Consumer Reports says about the bent legs when rear-facing:

    "One of the most common concerns for parents is that their child's legs are bent and appear uncomfortable against the seatback, and in that position are at a higher risk for injury in a crash.

    First, children are far more flexible than we are and most likely aren't uncomfortable in this position. Second, crash data shows that lower-extremity injuries (such as those to the legs) are rare for children who ride rear-facing and are as likely to happen rear facing as forward-facing. Riding forward-facing does increase the risk of head and spinal injuries however, which are far more serious than a broken leg."

    We are far from having this problem, but I had just read this article so I wanted to share since it seems relevant!
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from grimalkin. Show grimalkin's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    My son just turned 1 and is 32" tall, 26 lbs. We'll be keeping him rear facing even though he is big and may or may not feel cramped. He is used to facing the rear. What would be tough is trying to switch back a 12-24 month old baby who is already used to facing forward! I saw a horrifying slow motion video demonstrating what happens to a forward facing baby's neck in a collision - definitely cured any desire to switch the seat. I'd rather have a kid with an orthopedic problem than one who is dead, brain damaged or paralyzed.




     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: New Safety Guidelines

    There really isn't room for opinion on the matter.  The "experts" have somehow determined that, in the event of a crash, it's safest for a child to be rear facing for as long as possible, OR until they reach the height or weight limit for their seat.  In that instance, they'd be safer turned forward.

    The booster seat issue hasn't really changed.  The LAW is that they use one until 8 years old, but for years the recommendation has been that it's safest to use one until 57 inches, until the seat belt fits properly. My tall son was just under 57 inches at 9 years old, which means most kids should use one until at least 10.  My feeling is, too bad if they don't like it.  It baffles how my younger son's 8 year old friends (who are all smaller than he is) sit without a booster and the seatbelt across their necks, and look at him funny for using one.

    These guidelines are just letting us know what is believed to be the safest position in the event of an accident.  If people choose not to follow it, I guess that's fine, but I don't understand the ones I know who act like someone just made it up to make their lives more difficult, or the friend I have who says, "we never used booster seats...". Well, "we" apparently never got in a bad accident. 


     

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