Religion at Home

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Oh and ALF, I just learned in my conversion class that original sin is actualy the absence of holiness and the loss of immortal life.  I always thought that it was something whereby you were guilty of doing something when you were born and that baptism washed that away.  
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Well, that's your interpretaion of it. But you aren't Catholic, so why does it matter what one faith believes a certain act represents?  It's a Catholic sacrament meant for Catholics. You don't need to agree with it or understand it since you are not a Catholic and it doesn't pertain to you.  Just as a Protestant baptism does not matter to me, a non-Protestant.  Just b/c Protestants and Catholics has similar faiths and rituals does not mean they mean the exact same thing in either faith, or that one can understand what it means to the other.  Isn't that what spurred the Reformation and centuries of religous warfare? 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    That's where faith comes in. You either share the Catholic faith or you don't. If you want know what Catholics believe, google the Nicene creed.  There are ample books out there that will explain various aspects of Catholic faith.  Or ask your DH what he believes. 

    But telling a Catholic that they are wrong or don't understand the tenets of their own faith b/c they aren't giving you the answer that you expect is not a good way to engage someone [the priest, not me] in a heartfelt conversation about their faith.   

    With Catholics there are gradations of sin.  Original sin and other types of sin [mortal, venal] are not the exactly same thing - which is why there are different sacraments - baptism, Reconciliation, and Confirmation - that pertain to sin and salvation. 

    It's far more than can be explained on this type of forum. Take some classes if you really want to learn more. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from bostongrl. Show bostongrl's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    For us, church shopping was actually kind of fun.  We eliminated a few denominations off the bat (weren't really interested in 7th day adventist, etc) ... but then selected ~5 churches to check out.  3rd try was a charm and we never went to the other 2 that we had planned on.  We put a little thought into the locations/towns of the churches as well as the actual denominations.  For instance, we live in Worcester and chose to try out churches in a neighboring suburb so that there was a better chance of finding other young families and potential friends. 

    After each service, we would go grab a cup of coffee and bagels at dunks and talk for 20 minutes about what we liked/didn't like and maybe chat for a few more minutes about the sermon.  It was the first time DH and I had EVER talked about religion more than our initial 30 second conversation resulting in the agreement that our kids "should have a religion".  It became obvious pretty quickly that 12 years of a catholic education meant that I had a lot more "academic" knowledge than DH (even though he had gone to Sunday school) and I would often end up describing the back story so that we could chat about how it applied to our lives in modern day America.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from BsBride. Show BsBride's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    The 'humanist' movement, group, whatever you call it may be a good fit for some of you. It's mostly people who doesn't believe in a higher power per se, but want a community to belong to. The basic tenant is you don't need 'religion' to be a good caring person.
    Someone said atheism is a religion, I don't see how. It's the absence of belief in any higher power, how is that a religion?
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]The 'humanist' movement, group, whatever you call it may be a good fit for some of you. It's mostly people who doesn't believe in a higher power per se, but want a community to belong to. The basic tenant is you don't need 'religion' to be a good caring person. Someone said atheism is a religion, I don't see how. It's the absence of belief in any higher power, how is that a religion?
    Posted by BsBride[/QUOTE]

    Maybe the term atheism is a more commonly used word than humanism so it gets used, albeit incorrectly, as a catch-all for the god-free religion of humanism.  Semantics?

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhirledPeasPlease. Show WhirledPeasPlease's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    I can give you an atheist's perspective...Also, I grew up Catholic and went to Catholic school. Has your husband had any bad experiences with religion? Does he specifically not believe in god, dislike religion in general, etc? This is difficult because I know that it would absolutely be non-negotiable for me: my child will not attend church, any church, unless they decide to go themselves when they're older. I just think the idea of religion is unnecessary (which I won't get into because I'm not interested in offending anyone; it's just where I am). I was abused n Catholic school, which is one reason I'm so against it, and DH and I talked about this while we were dating and decided that we would teach our kids that different religions exist, explain the basic tenants, and if thy ask us if god exists we'll reply with, "Probably not, but no one knows." Does your husband not want your kids to experience any religion, or Catholicism in particular? Can you get him to sit down and talk about why?
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Atheism isn't a religion but is a faith.  It's not an absence of any belief system, it's the strong belief/faith that there is no higher power guiding the universe. 

    I have a lot to say on this thread but it's been a long week and it's time to drink hot chocolate, watch a zombie movie, and go to sleep.

    Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, as they say in Macbeth . . .
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from luckinlife. Show luckinlife's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    I was raised "christian" but never went to church.  As an adult I started to go to church.  I met my husband and we both agreed we would like to be involved in church.  He was raised catholic.  We went to catholic church and nondenominational and for us the choice was clear.  We felt much more uplifted and closer to the bible's teachings in a nondenominational church.  Luckily, we agreed on this.

    I am a scientist.  Sometimes I have difficult with the leap of faith.  However, I will tell you this:
    We go to a great church that does not discriminate against anyone. Personally, I would not stand for anything else.  Our church is welcoming to believers and nonbelievers.

    1)When we go, we are so much less focused on self. 
    2) We feel more in touch with our spiritual selfs.
    3) We are more humble.
    4) We find that we are more caring and understanding of others and there faults.
    5) We feel comforted in the belief of a higher power and I would love my DD to experience this feeling as well.
    6) We learn and are reminded of the life lessons that so beautifully illustrated in the bible.

    To me, the above is a gift to DD not "brainwashing".  I would love for her to feel a sense of fulfillment and comfort in church.  If she decides she does not want to go when she is older, that is fine with me because I can understand.

    I think that God and religion are not bad but people can be.  With all the terrible things that have happened in organized religion, I certainly understand people's disgust with it.

    All that being said, nap time has been a huge barrier to going!
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]All that being said, nap time has been a huge barrier to going!
    Posted by luckinlife[/QUOTE]

    Right??

    Also, I think atheism and agnosticism (sp?) are often confused.  I think, and may be wrong, that atheism is a belief in the lack of a higher power, and being agnostic is more the lack of the belief either way.
    Not positive, so I'm off to google it!
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from WhirledPeasPlease. Show WhirledPeasPlease's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Religion at Home : Right?? Also, I think atheism and agnosticism (sp?) are often confused.  I think, and may be wrong, that atheism is a belief in the lack of a higher power, and being agnostic is more the lack of the belief either way. Not positive, so I'm off to google it!
    Posted by medfordcc[/QUOTE]

    People confuse these a lot, but atheism is non-belief in god (basically the opposite of faith) and agnosticism is apathetic about the existence of god; you neither know nor care.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from cwagner13. Show cwagner13's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    It is probably an overstatement to call atheism as a religion as I did, but usually more of a faith although there are some religions where atheism is a component (just as it is a leap of faith to believe in God(s) or Jesus, it is also a leap of faith to firmly believe there is no such thing as God(s)). I did find this snippet which I found interesting:

    There are religions (including Buddhism and Taoism), in fact, that classify some of their followers as agnostic, atheistic, or nontheistic. The true opposite of "religious" is the word "irreligious". Irreligion describes an absence of any religion; antireligion describes an active opposition or aversion toward religions in general.


    This is what I was thinking more of. Not all religions centers around God as the western/islamic world knows it - and I have grown up with a parent who grew up in a culture that centered on Buddhist and Taoism (along with a parent from the more familiar Christian/Judaism/Islam that most people I know are comfortable with).

    Of course there are religions like Wicca that I know nothing about other than occasional references...
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Redsoxfan76. Show Redsoxfan76's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    To reply to the OP - this happened to me when I became pregnant. I wouldn't say I had a change of heart about religion, per se. But I definitely started 'praying' more. I was raised Catholic but I no longer consider myself 'religious'. I can't get past some where the Catholic church stands on some social issues, can barely find the time to do laundry never mind take 2 hours out of a Sunday to go to church, and I don't particularly feel spiritual in church, so I don't go.

    But if I wanted to, I would expect DH to support me regardless of his religious beliefs. I am not judging your relationship - I would just say it is definitely something you should have a talk about, in addition to the comments he makes in your DD's presence.

    As far as some of the other commenters go. I agree that I want my DD to grow up with good morals and be kind to others, etc. But I think I can teach her at home. I am not saying you cannot, I just don't think anyone needs the church, bible etc to produce a good productive human being who knows that shouldn't murder people or sleep with her neighbors wife or that she can help others in need. 
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Redsoxfan76. Show Redsoxfan76's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    One other thing -

    someguy said:

    In my opinion, taking your child into any church or religion before s/he is old enough to 1.understand it 2.request it or 3.be able to say no to it, is in some form brainwashing in itself. 
    Stay with me here for the reasoning, and this applies to all religions, not strictly catholic.  You're taking the kid to a place/environment at that young of an age, so they're going to follow blindly along with you just because you're the parent. They're too young to really understand what it is, but they keep going, because "that's what you do" and before you know it, they've become indoctrinated in the organization.  That's why I consider it mild parental brainwashing.

    That is a terrible argument. I don't remember 1. understanding 2. requesting or 3. being able to say no to going to school either but I don't think anyone would say my parents brainwashed me into thinking that education was important because "that is what you do".

    As I said, I am not a church goer, and my kid will not be baptised. But she will be taught that just because I don't believe in something, doesn't mean she can't. And that goes for how I expect her to treat others as well. To me people that bad mouth people with religious beliefs are as bad as people who shove religion down your throat. To each her own, stop being so judgy.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]One other thing - someguy said: In my opinion, taking your child into any church or religion before s/he is old enough to 1.understand it 2.request it or 3.be able to say no to it, is in some form brainwashing in itself.  Stay with me here for the reasoning, and this applies to all religions, not strictly catholic.  You're taking the kid to a place/environment at that young of an age, so they're going to follow blindly along with you just because you're the parent. They're too young to really understand what it is, but they keep going, because "that's what you do" and before you know it, they've become indoctrinated in the organization.  That's why I consider it mild parental brainwashing. That is a terrible argument. I don't remember 1. understanding 2. requesting or 3. being able to say no to going to school either but I don't think anyone would say my parents brainwashed me into thinking that education was important because "that is what you do". As I said, I am not a church goer, and my kid will not be baptised. But she will be taught that just because I don't believe in something, doesn't mean she can't. And that goes for how I expect her to treat others as well. To me people that bad mouth people with religious beliefs are as bad as people who shove religion down your throat. To each her own, stop being so judgy.
    Posted by Redsoxfan76[/QUOTE]

    Good point.
     
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  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from cwagner13. Show cwagner13's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]And really, school and church are two completely separate things and you know it.
    Posted by some-guy[/QUOTE]

    Are they? Really? (sorry watching too much Modern Family)

    School and educational districts are going to have their biases too, just not over religion most of the time - other than the debate of evolution vs creationism, which is definitely an overlap with religion. History is definitely very biased, and social sciences, and English, and whatever foreign language class you take.... just about every subject will be taught with some subjectivity (even computer science). So I would not state that the church and school is really all that different in terms of their influence over the young child's mind - just what is and is not acceptable to you as the parent.


    (which is why there is a large homeschool organization where I live)



     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    And really, school and church are two completely separate things     and you know it.

    So are you against saying the Pledge of Allegiance in school?  I went to public school and this is something that we started our day with every day.  I was surprised to find out most schools don't even do this anymore.  How sad is that? My son's school (catholic) says it. 
     
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  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from noitpec. Show noitpec's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    I'm a church going person but I believe that the Pledge of Allegiance should have "under God" eliminated.  I feel fortunate to be able to attend any church I wish but do not feel that I have the right to impose my views on anyone else by forcing them to pledge to God.  Many good, tax paying citizens do not believe in God.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from ml2620-2. Show ml2620-2's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    For what it's worth, I guess I don't belong in a traditional church after all. I worked through the beliefomatic, and came up with this:

    http://www.beliefnet.com/Entertainment/Quizzes/Beliefomatic.aspx
    Your Top 3 Faith Match Profiles Are:
    1. Liberal Quakers (100%)
    2. Mahayana Buddhism (100%)
    3. Neo-Pagan (100%)
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Intereseting, ml.  My dad is #1, but he hasn't always been.  We asked him to say grace at our table last time, and we sat in silence until he ended it with something I can't remember (not "amen," by the way).  DH and I had a hard time disguising our "what just happened?" expressions.  They don't talk during their worship services, either, they all just sit there for an hour.  Anyway, he's happy with it and even seeks out Quaker meetings (Sunday morning "services") when he's traveling.


     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from medfordcc. Show medfordcc's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    I cannot believe it's actually called the Belief-o-Matic!  That's awesome, and I seriously need to get back to work but I couldn't resist...

    1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
    2. Liberal Quakers (97%)
    3. Neo-Pagan (94%)


    ML, I'll see you at the next neo-Pagan meeting.  ;)
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Your Top 3 Faith Match Profiles Are:
    1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
    2. Liberal Quakers (96%)
    3. Secular Humanism (91%)



    This makes sense, given that my Dad was in Reform Judaism, and my Mum was a Low Anglican who became a Unitarian in her senior years.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from hughkona. Show hughkona's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    So for those of you who grew up Catholic (and I assume your parents are still practicing) did you baptize your kids or not? 

    I grew up very Catholic, as did DH.  Neither of us have attended mass since leaving for college, and I don't particularly believe most of the catholic beliefs that revolve around turning wine into the blood of christ, or even that Jesus Christ for sure existed.  It wasn't an issue, as we both felt fine having NO religion in our lives. 

    Once we had a child, all eyes were on us (first of our siblings to have a kiddo) whether or not we were baptizing her.  We didn't.  Both of our parents want us to to keep with "family tradition".  She is now 3.

    We're expecting #2, and I have considered baptizing just to do it, but as of now have no intention of attending mass.  It intrigues me to check out ::gasp:: another christian religion, but I honestly feel just fine not going to church on sunday at all.

    I just feel torn on the baptism thing... because everyone says its easier to do it as a baby than an adult... but I also agree with what many have said that it shouldn't be about that anyway.

    Just curious.
     

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