Religion at Home

  1. This post has been removed.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ml2620-2. Show ml2620-2's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Some-guy, there is nothing logical about it. I had the same thoughtpath as Hughkona.

    Hughkona, we baptized our DD in the Catholic church. I hate to admit it, but the two main reasons to do it is because I wanted DD to wear the christening dress that has been in my family for 100 years, and because it made my mother happy. If she decides to be a Catholic someday, she won't have to be baptized as an adult. If not, like I said, I got to put her in the dress, and my mom was delighted. 

    Now, we struggle with how to follow up as she grows. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Redsoxfan76. Show Redsoxfan76's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Okay, someguy - then replace church with 'my parents forced me to eat vegetables' in your original argument. They brain washed me with good nutrition! If you don't think that your comments are judgy...I don't know even what to say.

    Oh hugh - this was a big source of debate in my family. Both my mother and my sister tried to pressure me with the threat of DD not going to heaven. I told them Jesus wasn't even baptized until he was 30+ so I think she is safe. But really, this should be a personal decision for you. For me, I know that I won't go to church so *personally* I would feel like I was being deceitful by saying I would raise the kid in the church. My MIL is an avid church goer and very spiritual and I feel as though it would be an insult to her. And you know what - she doesn't care if we do it either way. But my family - who haven't been to church outside of a funeral or wedding in years - inexplicably cares if we do it. Sigh. Good luck.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    some-guy, life is hardly ever what it's "supposed" to be about.  Sometimes life is about making peace at some cost to us.

    Hugh, remember that one has to profess your own faith and promise to raise the child in the faith as part of the baptism.  No priest will do it if you tell him you're not seriously going to do that and are only going through the motions to make your families happy.  So, you'd have to keep your mouth shut and lie to pull this off.  If you value how your life will be, presumably harmonious, with your parents post-baptism enough to do that, that's your answer - do it.  If you have more trouble with it than you will with your parents if you don't go through with it, that's your answer - don't do it.

    However, it's no "harder" to be baptized as an adult.  Actually, it's easier - the adult is choosing to profess his or her own faith by the ritual of baptism (as is prescribed in the Bible).  Many if not most Protestant churches do it that way, in fact.  It might be "harder" in the Catholic Church because Catholic priests just don't do it very often - someone would have to be converting as an adult to Catholicism for it to be necessary there, and that's less common than infant baptism.
     
  5. This post has been removed.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    My only experience with seeing a Catholic baptism for an adult was when my brother was graduating boot camp in the Marines - He got a 3-in-1, Baptism, Communion and Confirmation all at once, in a pretty short service. So it seems pretty easy/simple to me.
    How he claims he decided to convert to Catholicism is even funnier - The drill instructor came into the barracks and asked "Does anyone in here believe in God?" Lots of guys raised their hands.
     "Does anyone of you like to read?" my brother and a couple of others kept their hands up
    "OK, You-" pointing at my brother "are the Catholic lay reader" 
    I have no idea if that is how it really went down, but it seems plausible, and it makes for a great story. Laughing

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from lukeseri58. Show lukeseri58's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    rdg - i got the same answer with belief-o-matic as you except 2 and 3 were reversed for me -- i guess it was my answer that i believe in reincarnation that got me the number one spot cause i don't believe in god at all -- completely athiest -- believe that we come back as better human beings each time, learning from our last life, and my "heaven" or when you have made it -- you come back as something in nature - a tree, flower, river, ocean, mountain - my family thinks i'm nuts - but that's what i believe -- i was raised catholic but i never baptized my daughter - never even contemplated it -- she has a high moral character and to me that is all that matters - the golden rule - treat others as you would like to be treated -- help those less fortunate than yourself

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    lukes, your post explained a mystery to me.  I was told that a distant relative of mine wanted to come back as a tree, and I never understood that.  Thanks!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]My only experience with seeing a Catholic baptism for an adult was when my brother was graduating boot camp in the Marines - He got a 3-in-1, Baptism, Communion and Confirmation all at once, in a pretty short service. So it seems pretty easy/simple to me. How he claims he decided to convert to Catholicism is even funnier - The drill instructor came into the barracks and asked "Does anyone in here believe in God?" Lots of guys raised their hands.  "Does anyone of you like to read?" my brother and a couple of others kept their hands up "OK, You-" pointing at my brother "are the Catholic lay reader"  I have no idea if that is how it really went down, but it seems plausible, and it makes for a great story. 
    Posted by amy-lynn[/QUOTE]

    I'd believe it. I think the Marines are a whole lot more efficient than most civilians. Comparing my experience getting my wisdom teeth out to my brother's at Parris Island was interesting.

    Converting to Catholicism as an adult requires a lot of education, but it typically includes Communion and Confirmation, both of which require significant preparation and education for children/adolescents.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from lukeseri58. Show lukeseri58's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    Kar, not sure she had the same beliefs as me but coming back as a tree to me sounds great -- i even think that coming back as an animal is an upgrade from coming back as a human

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Religion at Home

    In Response to Re: Religion at Home:
    [QUOTE]Kar, not sure she had the same beliefs as me but coming back as a tree to me sounds great -- i even think that coming back as an animal is an upgrade from coming back as a human
    Posted by lukeseri58[/QUOTE]

    She might not have thought the exact same way, but at least it gives the idea some context.  All I'd ever heard about it was that one, isolated fact about her desire to be a tree.  I think I was about 5 when I learned that and I couldn't file it anywhere that made sense in my brain.

     

Share