Vaccines?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GlitzyCity. Show GlitzyCity's posts

    Vaccines?

    I'm thinking the topic of vaccinations has surely come up on this board before. But I've searched as far back as August 2012 and haven't found a thread that addresses it. Is there a way to search for keywords on these forums? I don't want to beat a dead horse if it's been covered before.

    But if not, here's my question: I was hoping to hear some thoughts/experiences about vaccinating infants. Did you, or are you planning to, vaccinate, refuse, delay, etc.? Did the pedi support/not support your decisions? I'd welcome any information. I'm just trying to learn as much as I can about what I understand is a very controversial topic.

    Thanks!

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from clc51510. Show clc51510's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    I think you're right in that we haven't talked about this for awhile.  Here's what I did... at our 2 month appointment DS got two shots, they gave both in one leg and about 2 hours later his leg was swollen and he was inconsolable.  At his next appointment he needed two shots and I had them do one in each leg and he was fine, no swelling, a little crying but nothing like before.  So I decided from then on that I was only comfortable with him getting one shot in each leg at a visit.  At the 6 month appointment I told the doctor this and suggested that I would come back every two weeks to get his remaining shots.  She didn't push back and said it sounded like a reasonable plan.  It took me 2 more visits to get his 6 month shots done but it was worth the hassle.  When we went to his 9 month appointment the doctor was amazed that I was true to my word and came back to get the other shots, she said most people won't ever schedule the other vaccines.  This schedule works for all of us and I have a happier baby as a result!

    The moms in my playgroup have done a whole variety of schedules with the vaccines but it seems like the most important aspect is having a clear plan when you get to the doctors office.  Good luck!!

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from summerbride09. Show summerbride09's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    I never second guessed vaccinations for a second. There is no concrete evidence suggesting links to autism, and any other risks are far outweighed by the benefits. My DD had no trouble or adverse reactions to any of her vaccines, and I sleep easy knowing I've protected her against potentially deadly diseases.

    I saw no reason to delay her vaccines; however one of them did end up being delayed by a few months, but that was because the 5-in-1 vaccine was in short supply and my choices were to have her get 3 injections in one appointment or get 2 at one appointment and 1 later on; I chose the latter option and backed up that vaccine by a couple months, but now she's caught up. Our pedi had no issue with this, and I feel as though if I had chosen to delay or alter the vaccine schedule, she would've presented the information I needed to be informed, and let me make the choice (as she does on most topics).

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    I saw this heartbreaking story recently:

     

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2317767/Francesca-McNally-Heart-breaking-story-parents-baby-girl-died-whooping-cough-doctors-failed-recognise-didnt-jab.html

     

    Vaccination schedules exist for a reason.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from rama8677. Show rama8677's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    It seems that people tend to feel strongly about this issue.  It's such a sensitive topic for some people and its hard because its one of the first decisions that a new parent has to make for their newborn. I chose to vaccinate on schedule and both of my DD's did fine. My best advice is that you talk to your pediatrician in ADVANCE and come to a decision. Interview a few doctors to make sure you find one who you trust And whose practice on vaccination is in step with your philosophy.  

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from cwagner13. Show cwagner13's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    We stayed with the original schedule for both of our children (our second is still an infant so she still has more to go). We had debated this issue with our first because it is so conflicting... although we knew for sure that our kids would be vaccinated, just fearful of doing it so young.

    Our firstborn had a swollen leg for his first round but then no more issues for later ones. Our second - you could not tell she got any shots for any of the ones she has gotten so far, she hardly reacted to any of them.

    One question you should ask - what did your pedi do for his/her kids? I asked my really good friend who is a pedi and who has a child and that is one of the reasons we decided to stay with the regular schedule. It was never a consideration to us to refuse - even before the autism study was found to be fraudulent - because we know the diseases they protect against are worse, and we did not want to lose track of which vaccines were done if we were to do alternate schedule (which has not really shown any scientific basis to be any better).

    This is the one area that I have a strong bias - I can never understand why anyone would refuse for no good reason (exempting allergies and medical conditions that prevent vaccinations) especially every time I read about another infant dead or criticially ill from a disease that people choose not to vaccinate against like whooping cough. Because we have not had such a serious issue with the diseases that vaccines protect against - until recently, when more families choose not to vaccinate (hence the rise in whooping cough and measles).

    And having co-workers who come from countries where these diseases like polio, measles and yellow fever are still common, I have seen their babies on even more aggressive vaccination schedule since they know they are bringing their babies back to their home country before they are 1 for family visits. So their babies got more shots than the typical American baby by 9-12 months.

     

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    Our pediatrician is fairly old, and old school. When speaking to us about vaccines, he told us stories of seeing patients suffering with these horrible diseases while he was a resident. He said, "If you ever witnessed the horror of these diseases, there would never be a doubt in your mind as to vaccinating."

    I have incredibly strong feelings pro-vaccine and on schedule. I simply do not believe there's any rational argument against them, except in cases where they cannot be medically administered.

    If you do decide on an alternate vaccine for your child, it should be one of the first things you discuss with the pediatrician. Our practice will not allow families to delay or refuse the schedule.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from purplecow89. Show purplecow89's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    Most people who are anti-vaccine are making that choice so Mommy can be an extra special snowflake--I'm smarter than you, I care more about my child, I don't just lazily go along with what the so-called experts say, etc.

    They will take as gospel the anecdote of some gal in Topeka that they don't know from Adam....They argue that attempts to prove the autism study was a fraud is evidence that it must be true, or people wouldn't work so hard to discredit it...

    It's the mommy version of 9/11 truthers. 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    I don't have kids, but I'd keep the vaccine schedule come hell or high water, and there are strong opinions in my family against it.  Too bad.  They'd just have to be mad.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    We vaccinated both kids on schedule after some research by me and conversations with both pediatricians.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    vaccinate.

     

    it's irresponsible not to, both as a parent and as a citizen.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Arcain. Show Arcain's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    Glad to see so much good sense on these boards. We've followed the standard schedule but I have known people whose kids are particularly sensitive the vaccines (fever, pain, etc.) who did the go-back-every-two-weeks thing. That seemed to work well, and I've never heard of a pedi who opposed doing it that way.

    ALF, that story is SO sad, but brings up a point that often gets overlooked in all the hoopla over vaccines -- parents need to make sure they're up-to-date, too. My OB was on both DH and me to get the pertussis vaccine, and I think they gave it to me in the hospital shortly after I gave birth. DH had never gotten a flu shot but the doc and I convinced him to get one before we took DS home from the hospital.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from GlitzyCity. Show GlitzyCity's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    Thanks for all the thoughtful input. I'm a long-time lurker and I figured I'd get some good insight here. :) Good point about me and DH being up to date on all our vaccines, too. I'm pretty sure neither of us have at least the pertussis vaccine, so that'll be something to check into.

    My sister had really terrible reactions to vaccines when she was young. I like the idea of spacing them out a bit by going back every 2 weeks. Or at least having a shot in each leg, thanks for mentioning that.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    We started to space them out after my DD suffered 2 febrile seizures and had a history of spiking high fevers with her immunization shots.  DS has remained on the regular schedule.  I agree that the pros far outweight the cons especially when there is no definitive proof that vaccines do any harm.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from cwagner13. Show cwagner13's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    For the TDAP (adult vaccine that includes the pertussis), we made it a requirement for any family member who wanted to come see our baby to have one. It can not be stressed enough that if babies getting whooping cough, it is usually from an adult who does not even know they have whooping cough. And my parents' doctor told them they should get it, regardless of seeing babies or not, because elderly are at a risk too from complications from this same disease. TDAP only came out recently (less than 10 years, I believe) so it is very possible that most adults won't have it.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from lissafro. Show lissafro's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    The other thing about TDAP is that it doesn't last forever.  So people will need to re-up, even if they got it 5 years ago.

    I have a friend whose daughter is severly allergic to eggs and also has some sensitivities to brewer's yeast.  This means that her daughter cannot take some of the vaccines most people can.  Beyond caring for our own children, tt's for kids like her, who legitimately are unable to vaccinate, that we should all vaccinate our own--keep up the herd immunity.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from cwagner13. Show cwagner13's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    Lissa - that is the problem. Many people don't understand the concept of herd immunity, and unwisely make poor choices, thus exposing all children including those who for medical reasons can not get immunized. They assume that if everyone one around them does it, they are protected via herd immunity, without ever thinking that if they think like that, there are probably more like them in their same community who think like that, and there goes herd immunity.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from KAM2007. Show KAM2007's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    We do a slight spacing in vaccines-only one combo shot per visit, then return a month later for the remaining shots. I've never let this slip. Our pedi didn't think I'd keep up with it, and has commented that he's surprised that I've been true to my word. Vaccines are so important.

    When I gave birth to DD, the hospital insisted on giving me the Tdap vaccine, even though I had had it two years ago, but they didn't have a record of it (my PCP is based in a different hospital) so it was a must for them prior to discharge.

    Don't forget to get the flu shot parents! Esp if your LO isn't old enough to get it.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    In response to cwagner13's comment:

    Lissa - that is the problem. Many people don't understand the concept of herd immunity, and unwisely make poor choices, thus exposing all children including those who for medical reasons can not get immunized. They assume that if everyone one around them does it, they are protected via herd immunity, without ever thinking that if they think like that, there are probably more like them in their same community who think like that, and there goes herd immunity.



    Well said.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    One more in support of vaccinating on schedule.  No need to restate the reasons why, they've already been listed.  =)

    Same goes for me, DH and my parents who watch her 2x per week - I made everyone get Tdap and flu shots.  My mother does tend to get sick from the flu shot, so she was allowed to have hers on a 1/2 dose on 2 visits schedule.  lol...

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    We vaccinated on schedule and when our twins were younger, wouldn't let anyone come near (visit or babysit) who hadn't gotten a flu shot.

    There is a "mother's trick" that you should offer a small dose of Tylenol before the visit to ease the pain of the shots. But I've read that it can blunt the effectiveness of the vaccine. The needles are TINY - so don't worry.

    The link between autism and vaccines has been totallly discredited. The author of the original report has actually withdrawn the research report.

    And anti-vaccine types like Jenny McCarthy now say that they have cured autism by going gluten free. Go figure.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from siena09. Show siena09's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    Your OB should recommend TDaP during the third trimester. this is the current CDC recommendation for all pregnant women, even if they are up to date on the shot because it is thought that you can pass some immunity from the shot to your baby in utero. This will give partial protection until baby is eligible to get her own shot. 

     

    I'm personally very pro-vaccine. Vaccine refusal has killed babies, and with modern vaccies I dont think there is credible evidence that vaccines have killed anyone. The autism theory has been debunked. It seems like a no-brainer to me. 

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Chiclet831. Show Chiclet831's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    I think you can get the TDaP after 20 weeks. I got mine right around 24 weeks or something. I made DH and my dad get theirs too (my dad is the only grandparent over 65, when it is recommended to get a TDaP booster). I asked the pediatrician about doing the vaccines on a slower schedule just because I'm nervous about sticking DS too many times in one day. He said he'd support it, but that you get more antigens by sticking your hand in your mouth than you do with a vaccine. We're going to do the 2 month vaccines as scheduled but if it causes DS too much pain and swelling like CLC mentioned, I'm going to slow it down. The APA sets the vaccination schedule for a reason and I'm sure they take the baby's discomfort into consideration, but if we have a sensitive baby, we have to make adjustments.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from siena09. Show siena09's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    The CDC recommends TDaP between 27 and 36 weeks for optimal antibody transfer. i had mine just now at 34, per my OB's rec.

    http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/pertussis/tdap-pregnancy-hcp.htm

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from CT-DC. Show CT-DC's posts

    Re: Vaccines?

    A few nursing mothers have told me that they nurse their baby while their baby gets shots, that something about nursing helps the baby handle pain during the event and afterwards.  And it's not the same as taking a bottle - it has to be nursing (so it's the act of nursing, not the getting sustenance that makes a difference) They swear by it, I don't know if it's La Leche league hokum or real.  But it can't hurt!

     
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