Wheezing

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    In Response to Re: Wheezing:
    [QUOTE]I'd do everything that RT suggested to remove allergens before I put my child on a daily allergy med.  They work and are not "dangerous," per se, but there are many natural ways to remove allergens with no side effects other than a healthier environment and children. New research is showing that artificial scents (like in detergent and fabric softener) have an effect on hormone production and are not good for adults, let alone developing children.  My mom has been having trouble with her adrenal glands, and they are going scent-free as a multi-pronged approach to deal with that. ETA:  OR, I'd put them on an allergy medication right away and when I finished de-allergen'ing their environment see if they stayed well without the medication.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    MEDICATION should ONLY be used as a last resort AND two Dr's opinion's IMHO....TRUST me my step's helped my daughter!

    I refuse to be a "sheep" because I lack a medical degree - ASK QUESTIONS! Doc what alternative's are available for treatment? What is your medical opinion based on? If he says "a recent report" What report? By who? Do you have a copy I could read?

    My kid's Pediatrician was taken aback by my question's not because I was rude (I wasn't) but, because very few if any parent's asked the - as he put it - educated question's!

    So I will leave you with this advice for your next Dr appointment for you or your children.....THERE IS NO DUMB QUESTION!

    Wink
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    In Response to Re: Wheezing:
    [QUOTE]While I agree with almost everything here, you may not need to get rid of pets.  My brother has asthma and my parents had many middle-of-the-night trips to the ER when he first started having symptoms.  The trips became so frequent, they got a nebulizer to keep at home.  He was tested for allergies and he has MANY including cats and dogs.  The cat and dog allergies were notable, but not severe.  My parents started out with a thorough sanitizing of his bedroom, special covers on his mattress and pillows, removing many "non-essential" stuffed animals and washing the "essential" ones.  And I'm sure there were a lot of other things they did, too, but those are the ones I remember.  What we did not do was get rid of the cat.  Again, his cat allergies were not severe.  The cat generally wanted nothing to do with my brother and never went in his room, never slept with him, and would usually flee the room or remain on high alert if my brother was nearby.  As a result, my brother wasn't touching the cat very much, so the risk of touching the cat and then touching his eyes/nose/mouth was very low.  Of course, there was cat dander on the furniture and probably in the air, etc. but my brother wasn't reacting to it and it didn't appear to be an asthma trigger.  So, we kept the cat and it wasn't a problem.  My brother got in the habit of washing his hands if he touched the cat and he was fine.  As an adult, he hasn't completely grown out of his asthma, but it is well-managed and he uses a rescue inhaler when he needs to.   He has also lived with many cats and dogs throughout the years and hasn't had any problems.  At one point, my mother had 4 cats and my brother was fine when he was at her house even though one of the cats had claimed my brother's bed as his own. Obviously, if a kid is severely allergic to cats and has an asthma attack or breaks out in hives whenever the cat is around, keeping the cat probably isn't an option--so I'm NOT saying no one should ever get rid of their cat if their kid is allergic.  What I am saying is that it may be ok to take a "wait and see" approach, get rid of/reduce other household allergen exposures like dust/dust mites, get an air filter, protect pillows and mattresses, etc. and THEN decide if the cat can stay or not.  I just see so many knee-jerk "get rid of the pets" reactions when a kid is diagnosed with asthma and/or allergies and it may not always be necessary.  Sometimes it is, and it's obvious that it is, and in those cases, you have to do what you have to do and your kid shouldn't have to suffer from something that can be removed from the environment.  In other cases, it may just not be necessary and is not worth the trauma of getting rid of a beloved pet when the exposure can be easily managed and there doesn't seem to be any adverse reactions to having the pet(s) around.
    Posted by Daisy75[/QUOTE]

    I suggested the removal of pet's (if any) because the child in question is only 8 months of age....
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    RT--I don't disagree that pets can be an issue in some cases and I think I made that clear in my post. 

    I'm not sure why the child's age would be a factor in the removal of pets due to allergies.

    If the child is clearly being affected by the presence of a pet and removal/reduction of other possible triggers hasn't caused a noticeable improvement, then the pet needs to go regardless of the child's age. 

    If the child was mildly allergic to tree pollen, should the parents cut down all the offending trees within 5 miles?  Would it matter if the kid was 5 months old, 5 years old, or 15 years old?  Or does it make more sense to take reasonable measures around the house to reduce the child's exposure to the pollen?  I understand this isn't a perfect analogy, but I think you can get my point.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    Thanks but no pets anywhere near DS any time of day.  My brother had terrible asthma and allergies so I am pretty aware of the steps we can take from the allergy perspective to help DS as of now none of those things have helped.  We do not use anything with fragrance, he also has very sensitive skin and the fragrance irritates it.  So, we'll see, he now has a cold which has magnified the wheezing.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    In Response to Re: Wheezing:
    [QUOTE]RT--I don't disagree that pets can be an issue in some cases and I think I made that clear in my post.  I'm not sure why the child's age would be a factor in the removal of pets due to allergies. If the child is clearly being affected by the presence of a pet and removal/reduction of other possible triggers hasn't caused a noticeable improvement, then the pet needs to go regardless of the child's age.  If the child was mildly allergic to tree pollen, should the parents cut down all the offending trees within 5 miles?  Would it matter if the kid was 5 months old, 5 years old, or 15 years old?  Or does it make more sense to take reasonable measures around the house to reduce the child's exposure to the pollen?  I understand this isn't a perfect analogy, but I think you can get my point.
    Posted by Daisy75[/QUOTE]

    My son was "deathly" allergic to, of all things, birch tree's! And YUP, you guessed it, I had them chopped down! He did outgrow the allergy but at the time I did what I thought I needed to do - child's health or tree's? NO BRAINER!

    To each their own....Wink
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from CT-DC. Show CT-DC's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    Yeah, I'm allergic to birch trees, too - my reaction on my skin test was larger than for nuts, and I'm nut allergic!  Now that I've moved to the DC area I don't have the problems I used to in May and June (when birch trees bloom).. such relief!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    Went back to the pedi late last week and she agreed that it is time to see a specialist.  I was able to get an appointment before Christmas, I'm thrilled.  We discussed seeing an allegorist first but were in agreement that the pulmonologist seemed like a better step.  In the meantime DS has an inhaler twice daily - hoping that is all he will need!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    Best of luck! It's the "not knowing" that's soooooo frustrating!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    KT, that's great you got an appt before Christmas - that's quite a feat.  I hope you get a diagnosis and good solution right away.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: Wheezing

    Follow Up:

    I took DS to his appointment today and I am very glad that I did.  The pedi had put him on an inhaler and that has helped, the pulmonologist thinks he has restrictive airway disease which seems to be a lot like asthma but for babies.  Typically they grow out of it by age 2 and if not by age 5 they would do a real asthma diagnosis.  I feel terrible because they think he got this from a cold he had when he was 2 weeks old, the poor thing has been suffering since then.  So he is being monitored for the next month then goes back for another exam, xray, etc. 

    Also, the people at Children's are just the best, everyone was so warm, friendly, kind, etc, etc.
     
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