Manual Pumps

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SilverFestiva. Show SilverFestiva's posts

    Manual Pumps

    Does anyone use a manual pump regulary, or is everyone pretty much advocating for electric? I'm kind of expecting that no one is going to spend nearly $300 on a pump off my registry, and I've read some good reviews about the Lansinoh manual pump which is around $30 - that I can afford on my own. ;-)

    Has anyone used it or one like it? I am planning to pump at least once a day so DH can feed the baby, and then whenever I need to once I go back to work. Are the manuals pretty good for regular daily pumping?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Absolutely DO NOT buy a manual pump as your main pump. Pumping is enough of a pain with a motor doing it for you. If you want one for backup like if you're at a wedding or on a long trip, or just to express some extra when you become engorged, that's one thing. But if you're planning to pump for actual output, you'll be wasting your money on a manual.

    It's true that nobody will buy you a pump outright, but people will probably buy you gift certificates and you can use those toward a pump. Isis has 20% off sales from time to time -- I used one of those coupons for my pump. A new Medela shoulder bag will cost you over $300, but you can get an older model or fewer options for around $250.  I have an older version of this one: http://www.amazon.com/Medela-Style-Advanced-Breast-Backpack/dp/B0011E75RK/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1296436961&sr=8-2 It's been through 2 babies so far -- a friend borrowed it for her second.

    If money is really tight, you could consider buying one used. I know it sounds totally gross, but the pump is just a motor. All the stuff that touches you and your milk -- the tubes, horns, bottles, membranes, etc -- can be bought at Target or wherever.

    And don't try to get around the price by buying a single. It won't provide the suction you need, and pumping will take twice as long.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from winter09wedding. Show winter09wedding's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I second Lemon's comments- pumping takes forever- like 5 minutes to get ready, and then 15 minutes or so for pumping (and I think that I am lucky- there is a thread on timing), and then clean up. And, I can pump hands free and get work done. if you did both separate and slower, you would be pumping all day once you got back to work.

    other ways to save money-
    BRU often does a "buy the pump, get the extra supplies free" which will save you some money. they also have a frequent shopper card where you get money back, so that can help too.
    ask at work (not sure what you do, I work at a hospital, and I got it 20% off through HR). you can also call your insurance company and ask- Blue Cross isn't very helpful, but other companies may be.
    I agree w/Lemon about the gift certificates- you may even want to make a note on top of your registry (BRU has a place where you can do that) that you are hoping to breastfeed and that giftcards will go toward a pump.

    I know that the cost totally ___ (they are going to edit it anyway), BUT since I had DS have been looking for ways to save on time, to spend more time with him. if you think about it as a time saving benefit (e.g., if you have to take three hour long breaks to pump at work, you will have to work longer), it may make it easier to bite the bullet.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from smileyd. Show smileyd's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Don't buy your pump at a big box store.  Look for it online.  There are a couple of sites that sell them considerably cheaper.  Sometimes they don't even publish the prices online (or at least didn't when I bought mine 3 years ago), but will tell you to call for prices.  I got the highest model medela pump (with the fancy shoulder bag, etc. for $100 less than the regular pump was at Buy Buy Baby.  I bought mine from BestBuyBaby.com.  I found them just by searchign online!
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from LiveLoveLearnEnjoy. Show LiveLoveLearnEnjoy's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Silver if you have BCBS insurance they might pay for you to get a pump.  Just ask at the hospital for a prescription.  I delivered at MGH and the LC I first met asked me what I had for insurance and immediately had a prescription written for me to get one because we had BCBS.  She said it was one of the only health insurance companies that cover pumps.  (It's funny winter said BCBS wasn't helpful...they were great with us!)

    Oh and definitely stay away from manual pumps...you are not going to want to do that at all, EVER.  I tried a manual pump that they gave me in the hospital along with the parts to use the hospital grade pump in my room...I had stuck it in the baby bag thinking it would be great to use if we were caught out and about and I couldn't nurse.  The one time I did use it was awful and I cannot imagine having to use it on a daily basis.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JACON. Show JACON's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Silver, You might also consider renting a pump. I rented a hospital grade pump and it cost me about $30-35 / month from Lactation Care in Newton (not sure if that is near you). I'm so glad I didn't buy one b/c I had supply issues and deifintely needed the hospital grade. I pumped for 7 months so it still cost me less than $300. GL!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Good questions, Silver.
    I was planning to wait until the hospital and ask for a prescription.  Do y'all think I should call my insurance now to inquire?
    I also have an appt with the NP this week, so I'll ask her.  (You may remember I save most of my questions for her.)
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I would call and check with your insurance, but don't necessarily count on them covering the costs. I have BCBS and they would only cover the cost of the rental if there was some kind of diagnosed issue. (DS had a TT, so that was enough to do it. But I needed a prescription from both DS' pedi and my OB--because technically it was for me before they would arrange for the pump and coverage.) BCBS covered 10 months of a hospital-grade rental or buying a PIS. (I already had a Freestyle, so I went with the hospital-grade. Also, I EP'ed, so there's no way I could do that without a hospital grade pump.)

    I know not everyone will agree with me and I had an extreme situation because my DS was unable to latch because of a tongue-tie. BUT, I was so happy and relieved to have the pump when we brought DS home from the hospital. Obviously nursing wasn't going well, I was engorged, I was exhausted and stressed out, etc. It literally saved my sanity after 3 days to break out the pump, get some milk, and make sure DS was eating. (It also took 3 days to be able to get in to see a LC.) I don't think I could have handled shopping for a pump at that time and it was a weekend so BCBS wasn't going to be any help. Just something to think about. (I bought my pump through Isis when they had one of their big pump sales.)

    Also, I fully agree with everyone else. There's no way a manual pump can be your main pump.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from winter09wedding. Show winter09wedding's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    My DS was on time and had no feeding issues, so BCBS said that they don't cover pumps. what I was told was that you had to have a diagnosed problem with feeding (e.g., tongue tie, etc.) or been separated from the child (e.g., in NICU).  I asked my ob, and she said that they were very picky now about giving scripts- but if you can get one, BCBS would pay for the pump that they recommended from a certain approved distributor. I bought my pump a week before I was due through work, because at that point I knew I wasn't having a premie, and I didn't want to have to worry about getting a pump when DS was 3 days old. However, a girlfriend of mine just had a premie and BCBS gave her a pump no problem- was even delivered to the hospital for them.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from carriefranf. Show carriefranf's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I'll provide my dissenting experience.  I'm mostly a SAHM, but I sometimes work one or two full days a week.  My 2nd baby is 9 months old.  I've pumped pretty much 1X daily with both, and only have manual pumps.  It's allowed me to build up a comfortable freezer stash so that I've been fine with leaving the babies for full days once or twice a week -- I go without pumping all day (a bad idea generally, I know, if you're concerned about supply), then recoup the milk used over the next day or two.  

    My advantage is that pumping is easy for me since I have a tendency towards oversupply -- I usually can get 4 ounces in about 15 minutes.  My SIL, who has a tendency towards undersupply, hasn't been able to get much with either an electric or a manual pump.  She's on her second baby, too, and only has a manual now because it's about the same in terms of yield.

    Not to be a naysayer, but I'd only have a manual on hand before the baby is born to help with that early engorgement, then see if you feel like you need an electric before buying one.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Can't comment on the pump, per se, but about the $300 item on the registry I had a $300 knife block on my wedding registry, and people went in on it as a group gift.  As many people as they want can go in on one if it's too expensive for one person to purchase.  So, I'd say register for the one you want and let the chips fall where they may.  Either you'll get it from one person who wanted to give you something expensive, from a few people who wanted to spend less, or you'll get to buy it yourself at a discount afterwards (usually you get 10% off remaining registry items).  It's a no lose situation to register for it even if it's on the expensive side.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    You can try to view the pump as an expense spread over 6 months -- the $250 pump (which is great, I swear -- you don't need the shoulder bag, as a matter of fact, the backpack is smaller and easier to store and lug around) is only $42/month. If you're providing your child's entire sustenance with it, that's not a huge amount of money. And if you pump for a year, it's just $21/month.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from luvRIboy. Show luvRIboy's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    One note: no matter what pump you buy, don't open it until you're ready to use it.  They have seals on them, and can't be returned once the seal is broken.  I received one for my shower (group gift from a bunch of friends), but didn't open it in hopes I'd get a prescription, which I did.

    As someone else mentioned, BCBS is (according to the nurse at NWH) the only insurance that covers a pump, so if you have it, be sure to ask.  I got mine bc of latching issues. 
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from canukgrl. Show canukgrl's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    1 second what luvRIboy says about not opening it to be able to return it - I didn't even use mine with either kid until 4-6 weeks (we had no problems getting started) so if all goes well, you won't need it right away anyway.  I've also heard of ppl who went all out and bought a pile of pumping stuff and then ultimately were not able to BF and didn't use it.  BCBS did used to cover them, no problem but I understand that is no longer the case.

    Another place to check is CVS - if you have an extracare card, they have 20% off weekends every so often, and with that you can get a Pump in Style for less than $200 (I was looking for my sister)
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from roneil68. Show roneil68's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I have both a manual and electric which were both under $200.00 and I love them both.  The manual is a Medela ($29.00) from BRU and I use it every morning to pump on one side while I nurse DD on the other.  I get about 3 oz. from that one side now.  My electric pump is from Ameda, Purely Yours, which I bought on line from their website for $159.99.  I use that 3 - 4 times per day, 3 days per week at work.  When I first went back to work when she was 3.5 months old, I would get around 5 - 6 oz. per pumping session.  As she's gotten older (7 months now), I am definitley producing less milk but I've gotten my supply up with fenugreek, oatmeall...yada yada yada.  Anyway, I've had really great luck with these to brands - Happy Pumping!!
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I also recommend looking online for a pump. I got the Ameda Purely Yours, which I loved (fewer little parts to assemble) with the bag, cooler, 6 bottles, etc. for about $175 online. This was a little over two years ago, though, so the price might have gone up, but I know I saved ~$50 from the BRU price. I was a little worried that I was going with a retailer I had never heard of, but they had gotten good ratings through Amazon, and the price could not be beat. So shop around. And go for the electric, I tried a manual one a ffew times, and it was awful.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from SilverFestiva. Show SilverFestiva's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Thanks for all the input!

    I'm having a very small shower so I'm not anticipating any large group gifts, but I hadn't thought about potential gift cards.

    I did call my insurance - I have Harvard Pilgrim; they only prescribe the pump if it is medically necessary like if the baby has to be in NICU or something and I can't breastfeed. So, obviously we hope that doesn't happen.

    I'll look into some other brands...the most common/recommended is Medela and of course that's the priciest (even on amazon). It is good to hear some good reviews of another brand!
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Harvard Pilgrim also covers for inverted nipples. That stuck in my mind because who knew they could be inverted?

    (apologies to anyone here who has them)
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from JKFDais15. Show JKFDais15's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    My cousin had the medela and didn't like it.. ended up buying the Ameda after (costly since she couldn't return medela but she really hated it) and loves the ameda so I think it's all preference..  I never bought one and I plan to inquire about them at the hospital.  I'm leaning toward renting as i only plan to BF while on maternity leave (3 mos) so the overall cost is less that way but ya never know.. could change my mind depending how it goes, etc. 

    Oh and I called my insurance and asked if they covered pumps at all and they said no.. even with a prescription..  i don't have very good insurance though (aetna). 

    GL!
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from nene72. Show nene72's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I would definately check with your insurance first.  I have  BCBS and when DH called, they wanted us to get it through a distributor.  However, my CNM wrote a script for me at the hospital for inverted n!pple (which I didn't have) and one was delivered to me.  The downside is that you don't have a say in what you want.  If you are returning to work and plan to express your milk an electric pump is what you want.  You'll probably use it a couple of times a day.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from rysmom. Show rysmom's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I delivered my second at UMass and they give every nursing mother a Medela pump and charge it to your insurance.  I didn't ask for it they just came in with it one day.  I have Harvard Pilgrim for insurance and they did tell me that they would not cover it unless medically necessary.  Maybe the hospital eats the cost or they are covered by a grant.  I have no idea.  The odd thing is I have friends who received a pump with every child they have had.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Bummer!!!  I could have sworn I saw lots of advice on here to wait and get a script at the hospital.  I have Harvard Pilgrim as well, so odds aren't looking too good.  I will check with NP tomorrow and then maybe add one to BRU just so I can get a discount with the completion coupon.

    I can't speak from experience because I only put a nursing cover on my registry, but I've noticed that nursing gear tends to be left over on registries, so I don't think it's the type of thing people are likely to chip in on.  They'd rather get an adorable swing or something.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from SilverFestiva. Show SilverFestiva's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    DH just told me if he wins a poker game soon he'll buy me one. Fram, I'll see if you can get in on that action, too. ;-)
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from betty7. Show betty7's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    I had an inverted n1pple and called my insurance (BCBS) when I was pregnant and was told they only cover a pump for "latching difficulty". Well, it turned out that my baby had latching problems on the side with the inverted n1pple.  So, the lactation consultant in the hospital asked my OB to write me a prescription for a pump.  I got to choose what pump I wanted as well, so I got a PIS completely covered by BCBS which was great. 

    I second what others have said, it was so useful to have the pump when I got home from the hospital.  I recommend buying a pump (and not opening it), and if you end up getting a prescription then you can return it.  

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from MM379. Show MM379's posts

    Re: Manual Pumps

    Not to sound redundant, but in my experience the best plan is: buy it (close to end of pregnancy so you can max out potential 90-day return policy if unopened), don't open it, if you get a prescription for one, you can then return original one.  It seems pretty variable to me what I've heard of being concerned as "medically necessary."  Some insurances will only cover rental and only if seperated from newborn like with NICU, others will cover an actual purchase with all sorts of roadblocks like latch problems, inverted n!pples, supply and weight gain issues, etc.  With buying one in advance but not opening it, you have some assurance: if you don't get a prescription but are completely in pain and engorged in the middle of a blizzard (happened to me with DS), then you have a pump ready to go.  But if BFing doesn't work out or if you do get an Rx, again, having left it unopened means you can return it.  I used mine only for about 9 weeks to help with engorgement, building up supply, pump for bottles when dealing with thrush, and to build up a back up freezer supply when I thought I was still going to do it long term.  I ultimately switched to formula, but to be honest, having it was invaluable and I couldn't have dealt with a manual even if it was for 9 weeks.  I think I would have paid a million dollars at that point to make things work and be more convenient.  And I'm not an expert, but I am not sure if the suction on a manual would be considered powerful enough to help with supply issues in the same way an electric would - but i could be wrong... definitely check with actual experts. 
     
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