September Updates

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from mbg109. Show mbg109's posts

    Re: September Updates

    IPW, you comment about being a dairy plant made me laugh out loud.  Every time DH and I read about or talk about BFing, he starts mooing.  And then he won't stop! :)
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: September Updates

    I just wanted to add my two cents about the list of bf'ing hints. My DS was born with a tongue-tie that wasn't corrected until he was almost 4 weeks old. He wasn't able to hold a latch, so I started exclusively pumping at 1 week, and since he didn't like learning to relatch after the tongue-tie was fixed and I knew I was returning to work in a few weeks, I have been EP-ing for him since week 1. We are VERY close to hitting one year, at which time I will JOYOUSLY return my hospital grade pump and not miss it one bit. I give this info as background and also a reminder that you may or may not have difficulties bf'ing, but you can work out something that works for your family whether it's EBF, EP, BF and supplementing with formula, or FF. Keep an open mind and get help right away from an LC if you feel you need it.

    I wanted to comment on the n*pple shield advice specifically. I used one with DS when he ripped my n*pples to shred trying to latch. It is a HUGE pita to use and make sure you have ready (cleaned/accessible) for feedings. I would advise avoiding one if possible (some conditions, like inverted n*pples may necessitate a shield). The other thing, if you do buy one, the sizes don't go by the size of the baby (i.e. small for infants), but by the size of your n*pples. I ended up with one 24 mm and one 27 mm once my LC took a look at me. I never would have known I needed two different sizes. (The same was true for the cones for my pump--I use a 27mm on one side and a 30 mm on the other per my LC. The pumps come with a standard 24 mm. I didn't even think about it until meeting with an LC.) It has nothing to do with cup size, either...I am a modest C cup before pg, while bf, and as I taper down.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    In Response to Re: September Updates:
    [QUOTE]I'm starting to get really freaked out about breastfeeding actually.  It seems like no one I know has had or is having a good time with it. 
    Posted by IPWBride[/QUOTE]

    I loved breastfeeding and really miss doing it. We weaned at 19 months.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from SarahInActon. Show SarahInActon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    I second and third Kiwi's remarks about the n*pple shield.  We were given one by a well meaning but pretty misinformed nurse at the hospital and ended up pretty much tied to it four at least 4 or 5 months.  Not only did it mess with my milk supply, it pretty much eliminated being able to BF in public.  They can be difficult to get on and take two hands.  Weaning off it was a nightmare and took MONTHS even with the help of our lactation consultant.  I bought zillions of them and spent half my time freaking out about where I left the last one.  They are clear and very hard to see and even a bigger pain to clean.  You've got to slather them with lanolin to make them stick and then try not to get lanolin all over everything.  I would avoid it like the plague unless that's your ONLY option. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    In Response to Re: September Updates:
    [QUOTE]I thought that you weren't supposed to switch between BF and pumping/bottle in the beginning.  I was under the impression that it dimished your supply, messed up whatever semblance of rythm you might have and doesn't work to solidify the nursing practice for the baby.  Am I wrong?  Is this a philosophical choice then?  I'm so confused!
    Posted by mbg109[/QUOTE]

    If you're breastfeeding, you don't want to introduce a bottle for two weeks because the baby could have "n1pple confusion" -- apparently it's easier to get milk from a bottle than a breast. A friend who had a difficult delivery and had to supplement with formula at first was taught to give her baby formula in a little cup -- the baby drank right from the lip and wrapped his hands around it, just like a person. Babies are amazing! I also know women who have supplemented with bottles all along and not had a problem with n1pple confusion, so I think it's more of a precaution.

    Unless you have a supply problem -- over or under supply -- breast milk is produced on-demand. The more you nurse and pump, the more you produce.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: September Updates

    DD was also tongue tied which led to the exclusive pumping and her tongue was not corrected until about 4 weeks.  By that point I was comfortable with the pumping and the lactation consultant said I'd probably need some private sessions (that would need to get approved by healthcare) to get her to nurse again so I just stuck with pumping.  I also liked pumping because I knew exactly how much she ate.

    **Kiwi - Did you know that tongue tied is genetic, I was surprised to hear that. 

    I don't know much of anything about the shield except that a woman in the BF group was trying and trying to get her son off of it.  I don't know what her reason fwas for using it though.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kiwigal. Show kiwigal's posts

    Re: September Updates

    KT--I did learn that TT is genetic. Actually, the first time we met with the LC, she took one look at DH and said, "Dad, you have a mild tongue-tie." Amazing, huh?

    Our pedi is very old-school and says that in his residency days, the pedis would go through the nursery and snip all the tongues at night. Part of me thinks that would have saved us OODLES of frustration if that were still protocol.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    I think the hardest part of breastfeeding is fear and frustration. You have this idea in your head that you're supposed to just know how to do it, like a cat or a pig. But it's actually a learned skill, and something that women were taught to do by the other mothers in their community and  helped out throughout the process -- because it is a process. I think that my body was designed to breastfeed -- the midwives went on and on about my n1pple shape and length (embarrassing!), I had oversupply and no pain, and my daughter latched perfectly right after she was born. But I STILL had trouble in the first couple weeks, and I went to support groups and talked to LCs and cried on the shoulders of other breastfeeding moms. Your whole self-image gets tied up in it, and you feel alone and overwhelmed. You need to remember that there's a huge support network out there for you, and that babies will scream and thrash about and barf up all your hard work a million times a day, and it's okay.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Ha, that is funny!

    You are lucky, my pedi (former pedi) was totally against me getting it clipped.  She kept talking about french kissing - I said I really don't care if she can french kiss, I'd like her to be able to speak without having issues or learning to adjust her tongue to make the proper sounds. 

    I am planning on looking at this baby right away to see if they also have a tongue issue!
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Ok, dumb question here... not sure what "tongue-tied" means... is it when the piece of skin (or whatever it is) that connects the underside of the tongue to the bottom of the mouth is too short, so the baby does not have a wide range of tongue motion?
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Not dumb at all - Tongue tied is when the skin under the tongue is too far forward, almost like its tied down.  The small piece of skin prevents the tongue (depending on the severity) from having full range of motion, being able to extend forward, up, etc.  In DD's case her tongue had a heart shape to it because the under skin was pulling back. 

    If you have a baby that is tongue tied the solution is really easy, they literally just snip it.  Its best to get it done as soon as possible.  After DD had hers clipped she was sticking out her tongue at home, it was really cute!

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from KT75. Show KT75's posts

    Re: September Updates

    BTW, anyone able to tell I can not focus on work today - lol
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from rysmom. Show rysmom's posts

    Re: September Updates

    DD was also tongue tied.  Unfortunately we didn't get it clipped until she was 4 mos. old.  Go with your gut and don't hesitate if you think there is an issue.  That is my advice.  

    Speaking on the genetic issue...did you know that a large % of people who are tied on the lower are also tied on the upper which will cause a separation of the front teeth?  We ended up having both done for DD.  I think DS might have a slight one too but we never did anything about it and now he is in speech therapy.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: September Updates

    RE: BFing and pumping.  You aren't supposed to introduce the bottle in the first 2-4 weeks to avoid possible n*pple confusion.  However, if you are going to be pumping, I would suggest you start doing that and giving a bottle as soon as you can after that first couple of weeks, as if you don't, you might end up with a baby like mine who REFUSES to take a bottle.  I was afraid of the breast pump (it just intimidated me), and was having such a great time BFing that I didn't pump until closer to the 2 month mark, and then only for "practice".  DD was a pro at BFing by that point -- she was very efficient.  When I returned to work at 3 months, we had a heck of a time getting DD to take a bottle.  She went on a hunger strike.  For ten days, she wouldn't eat a thing while I was at work.  She held out until I got home and nursed her.  If anyone tried to give her a bottle, she would just cry and refuse it.  It was incredibly stressful for everyone, especially was I was already upset about going back to work and leaving her.  The moral of my story is that you don't want to introduce the bottle too early, but you also don't want to introduce it too late.  This time around, despite my disdain for the breastpump, I'm planning to start pumping and bottle feeding sooner to avoid a repeat of what happened with DD.  I am hoping I have another easy time BFing, because I would really hate having to pump exclusively.  Anyone who does that is seriously my hero.

    mbg, congrats on the outstanding scan results.  What a relief that must be!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Oh and Silver, I can't believe that woman.  Certainly very rude.  Some people have no filter.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from amy-lynn. Show amy-lynn's posts

    Re: September Updates

    I also want to give encouragement to everyone who is BFing. I BFed DD until she was 14 months (exclusively until she started solid foods at 6 months), pumping at work when I went back when she was 11 weeks old, so I know it can be done. It isn't always easy, and I hated pumping, but it is doable.
    Evavase - If you are just starting out, one ounce is awesome. I would get maybe a third of an ounce at best on each side when I first started pumping - and that was in the mornings, when I seemed to have the most milk - later in the day forget it - I'd feed DD, then wait 30 mins. try and pump and be lucky to get more than a few drops. If you are returning to work, you will find that when you pump in place of a feeding you will get a lot more.
    Also the frequent feedings will help get your supply up, so while it is hard, it is also helping.
    I think that list is great, but I would also add that when you are pumping, it can be much more difficult if you are cold, and the room at my work for pumping was like an icebox - I kept an extra cardigan to wear to help keep warm.
    I never got mastitis, but I did get a blocked duct - it was painful, and the only thing that worked was lots of warm compresses and massaging.
    One last thing that I never expected was how hard it was to stop nursing... My DD was down to nursing only twice a day, I had stopped pumping, and I was preparing to wean her, when she got a cold and went on a nursing strike. That was the end of it -  and I got really sad when it was over. I think the change in hormones when you stop nursing is pretty intense, and no one warned me.
    So good luck! It is doable, and it even can be fun! (just not pumping, pumping was never fun )
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from am1028. Show am1028's posts

    Re: September Updates

    I will echo what Amy-lynn said about no one telling you about how hard it is when you STOP nursing.  I BF'd DD until she was 22 months and it was REALLY hard on me when I stopped.  Granted, I had a few other things going on hormonally at the time and was forced to quit for reasons beyond my control, so it may have been even harder on me than others, but I struggled for a few months after stopping.  I really didn't think it would be that hard.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: September Updates

    In Response to Re: September Updates:
    [QUOTE]BTW, anyone able to tell I can not focus on work today - lol
    Posted by KT75[/QUOTE]

    Me either.  :)  Thanks for explaining!
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates


    I think it's hard no matter what -- I chose to stop, and I still feel sad about it and miss our special time together.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from nene72. Show nene72's posts

    Re: September Updates

    I also want to add that not all BF stories are horror stories.  I've been BF DD since day one.  Luckily, she was able to latch on really well.  I didn't take a BF class beforehand because it was offered at the hospital and if I didn't take it, I couldn't have a LC.  In the hospital, the hardest part of BF was the nurses.  They each had advice on how to position the baby and how long I should feed and it made everything really confusing (DD was a snacker...she would feed for about 5-10 miins at one breast and then feed 30 mins. later).  When I met with the LC, she told me not to worry since my daughter was gaining weight (which rarely happens in the hospital).  Initially, the most painful part was when she latched on but after that it was OK.  There are times when my n1pples are sore and I use the cream.

    Re: pumping. I would try to start as soon as possible, especially if you plan on pumping at work.  Don't worry too much about how much you're gettting but try to do it for at least 10 minutes.  Morning is the best time.  Right now, I'm really stressed about having enough expressed milk for when I return to work. 

    Also, similar to birthing, its OK if one simply tried to BF and could not.  I know a few people who beat themselves up because they couldn't BF.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Also, don't get freaked out if you don't pump much -- babies are more efficient than pumps, so a baby will pull more milk out of you than you'll see in the bottle.

    I pumped diligently for 12 months and my daughter never took a bottle. So if you're nursing at home but not pumping much at work, it will all still even out.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    that's it, really -- the ONE thing I wish I'd known before having a baby, breastfeeding, any of it, would be to relax, not overthink things, and try to go with the flow. Nurse when the baby makes "neh" noises, pump when you have time and supply, sleep whenever you possibly can, and watch as much television as possible because you won't have time later.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemonmelon. Show lemonmelon's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Incidentally, this is the "neh" sound to which I referred:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6CFSGAueyo

    Neh!

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Is this the Baby Bargains book people have mentioned?

    Silver - Funny that she thought it was better to say she had noticed than to just admit she had seen it on your computer!

    MBG - I got the same results - 1 in 10,000!  I hadn't stressed over it, but it was still great news!  The person who left me the voicemail said that is the best possible result. No clue if that is true.

    Re BFing:  If you rent a hospital grade pump, does insurance cover it?  I'm sure it depends on your insurance.
    Also, how long did it take for you all to stop producing milk once you stopped BFing?
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from MM379. Show MM379's posts

    Re: September Updates

    Fram - totally depends on your insurance.  Some insurances will pay for you to buy a good Medela pump, others will pay for you to rent a hospital grade pump.  Sometimes you need to have seriously documented difficulties for insurance to kick in, other times, the LCs signature on a piece of paper is all you need.  My insurance would cover the rental of a hospital grade, no purchasing, and the rental was only covered if mom and baby were seperated, such as mom being discharged but baby needing to stay in NICU.
    I just wanted to add my unsolicited two cents on the BFing.  A lot of my friends and coworkers and I are in the baby/pregnancy stage.  I work with several women who exclusively BF'd, returned to work at 12 weeks pumping and it all worked great.  I have 3 close friends who were very successful BFing with no early struggles.  They've all taken their own twists on BFing: 1 supplementing at night, 1 weaning at 6 mos, and one never even used a bottle once for the entire 12 mos she BF'd.  They taught me that successful BFing doesn't have to be a cookie cutter recipe from LLL recommendations.  But there were also a few of us in my circle who really, really struggled.  I do not mean to add to the horror stories at all.  But I do want to say that I did suffer from post-partum depression (actually more anxiety) and my difficulties/complications BFing were DEFINITELY exacerbating my symptoms.  BFing was actually detracting from my ability to bond with DS.  I don't want to go into details b/c it still brings up guilt feelings, but one thing my BFing and my bottle friends helped me realize, as well as my pedi and OB, was that at some point, bonding with my baby and being a more confident and calm mom outweighed the benefits of BFing and although BF is considered best, plenty of healthy babies, including many of us in our generation, were bottle fed.  I actually think my OB and my pedi were relieved when I decided to stop b/c I was beating myself up so much.  I am by no means trying to discourage anyone struggling with BFing and I truly commend women who make it through the struggles.  But I do want to say, if anyone is being hard on herself or struggling more than "baby blues" and BFing is part of the struggle, it is OK to decide to stop.  It also works FINE for many women to BF and supplement at the same time to take some pressure off themselves.  I know it isn't recommended right away while building a supply, but even my LC reminded me, "Your baby HAS to eat, so one way or another, you will feed him."  I ultimately started weaning at 8 weeks and completely stopped at 10 weeks.  I definitely was much more comfortable with BFing by the end and probably could have done a BF/formula mix for longer comfortably and happily, but ultimately decided I did not want to return to work pumping at 12 weeks and just wanted to be done.  I also decided to start an Rx for the anxiety, and although it was safe for BFing, it did factor in to my decision to fully switch to formula.  I definitely found myself less pressured, less anxious, and less rigid with the flexibility of formula feeding and it WAS the right choice for us.  I don't regret trying BFing and I don't regret switching to formula at all.  I went every single day to the LC support group at So. Shore Hospital and i don't think I would have even made it to 8 weeks without that group, and even the LCs helped me feel ok with my decision to stop.  Now that I am expecting #2, I will absolutely try BFing again.  I will probably be more open to the idea of supplementing early on and I probably will not be as hypervigiliant about some of the aspects of BFing I was obsessing over and just try to be a little more laid back.  If it works great, if it doesn't, that's fine too.  Either way, a healthy, happy baby with a healthy, happy mama needs to be the result!           
     

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