TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    I think people 'bashed' you b'/c you specifically said you had no problem w/ people discriminating against pg people or families w/ small children b/c you didn't want to deal w/ the hassle or the expense of deleading. Unless you reside on hte premises of a certain sized property, not renting to familes w/ children or pg people is illegal. YOu should not be a landlord unless you are willing to follow the law.

    My dad was a landlord for a number of years. He owned a small apt building. It was a royal PITA. I was a small kid and I remember him getting calls from idiot tenants in the middle of hte night b/c htey did something stupid that caused a problem that required a plumber, electrician or other repair person.  He eventually got fed up w/ it and sold the place.  So I get that it's a pain and you want to adequately screen potential renters.  I think the problem was w/ the fact that you were saying or implying that you open discriminated [perhaps illegally] against families or women who were pg.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Well said, allreadymarried...

    I was strictly trying to help others understand how it's not always about making money because if they can't empathize with that, I can only imagine how they feel about anyone actually having the nerve to make money on the house in which they took a risk and invested. Even corporations are only supposed to exist to give people jobs, not make a profit. Money mouth  

    My husband has mentioned buying a two family (not to live in) a handful of times over the years but once I remind him of all of the nonsense my parents have dealt with, he quickly changes his mind. He thought he could hire someone to manage the house, but it still would never be worth it to me.

    I am also done.  If you can have any type of response besides, "oh, sorry, now I get it" then it's useless to try to explain further.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    In Response to Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING:
    Michelle, I don't think anyone meant anything against you or your parents. I think the responses - mine included - were more in response to allready's early posts, which seemed really harsh. As it turns out, the harsh tone was unintentional. But it's hard not to read something that pertains to one's own situation and not take it personally.
    Posted by lemonmelon


    Fine, but I think those other two comments were directed at me. Either way, the fact that someone thinks you should not buy a house if you want to control who lives in it is beyond me.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    @ALF: 
    "I think people 'bashed' you b'/c you specifically said you had no problem w/ people discriminating against pg people or families w/ small children b/c you didn't want to deal w/ the hassle or the expense of deleading. Unless you reside on hte premises of a certain sized property, not renting to familes w/ children or pg people is illegal. YOu should not be a landlord unless you are willing to follow the law."

    -I did not say I had "no problem" discriminating, and I have no personal experience with lead paint. I just said that it's not always that cut and dried.  If a landlord has a different tenant to choose, sometimes it's in their best interest, whatever the reason.  

    -I was ONLY trying to open a window to the other side of the matter, and what could be the potential reason.  

    -The owners do live in the two family I was talking about, and again....if you got ten applicants for an apartment, would it be discrimination if you happened to pick one of the applicants that didn't have children, whether that was the complete reason or not? Come on, there is no "law-breaking" involved here.  Maybe the childless couple has a more stable income, maybe you had more in common with them and thought there would be a better relationship, maybe they were friendlier.  If you weren't supposed to have a choice, someone else would be doing the renting for you.  Maybe the president will be taking complete control of that soon...
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    If, in your scenario, the fact that you wuold not have to delead if you rented to the other applicant played a role in your choice of tenant, then the family w/ the kid would have a discrimination case. 

    The bottom line is, if you don't want to play by the rules, don't be a landlord. I don't want to deal w/ it, which is why we rent [DH has a job that requires that we be mobile]. If we bought, we'd be landlords from afar and it would just be too much of a PITA.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Whatever...if a person such as yourself went out of their way to file a discrimination case based on something like that, then I would feel more than relieved that I did not rent to you!  

    And...in that case...you could not prove what the reasons were that the landlord chose someone else...so it would be a waste of time.  

    The bottom line is...unless you say, "NO, I will not rent to you because you have a child". There is no discrimination.

    If I have a blonde and a brunette and I pick the blonde, does the brunette file a discrimination case?  Or a woman and a man?  Or what if I pick the guy with one leg, does the person who stutters have a suit because I didn't pick him? Better yet, if I pick a family with two children, does the family with one child think I have something against only children? Geesh!  



     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Argue that to the MCAD hearing officer or judge.

    Anyone can file a case about anything.  Whether they will win is another story.  I said the person would have a case, not that they would necessarily win it.  Whether it was more likely than not that discrimination played a role would be something for a jury to decide.  You don't need an overt statement such as "I'm not renting to you b/c you have kids" to win a case like this. It's a 'more likely than not'  standard - and circumstantial evidence is par for the course in these cases.   

    I spend all of my working life working on other people's cases. There is no way in hell I'm going to file a lawsuit of my own re a housing discrimination matter.  I also don't have kids, so this scenario doesn't really apply to me.

    And yes, people do in fact file cases b/c someone w/ one disability got hired while they did not and they have a different disability. Or that an Asian got the job b/c they were a minitory and they didn't get it b/c they were Black.  These are the cases floating around my office right now.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lostgrouse. Show Lostgrouse's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Well to the OP, I have a rental condo (which we don't live in) and we rented it to a nice young couple who was expecting their first child in January.  They had the baby in December and they've been in our place since September of last year.  We went through a realtor and we were only hesitant to take them as tenants because they had never rented before and had no real credit history.  However, their parents were willing to co-sign so we went ahead an did it.  We lived there when DD was born and it's a nice place for a young family.  So now you can have another happy story on the other side from a (reasonably) happy landlord.  Granted it would be nice if we didn't have to call them every month to remind them to put the check in the mail, but they're learning too.  
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    I understand, Alf, but while many times they are justified, don't you sometimes feel these people have no business suing anyone?  That they waste time on things like that instead of doing something that would benefit them more, like looking a different job or apartment? (kind of like me wasting all day on this issue that I really have no vested interest in other than the fact that I hate when people don't understand what seems so logical to me).  Granted, you're glad these people exist because that is your livelihood, and there are many justified cases out there, but you must sometimes wish you could tell them to drop it and move on.

    And, you weren't saying, "someone could still sue you", you were basically saying it's illegal not to rent to family, regardless of the individual scenario or reasons.  Yes, people can sue anyone for anything.  But, from a personal (human, not textbook) standpoint, do you really feel that if a family is one of several applicants that does not get chosen for an apartment where the owner lives that the owner has intentionally done something wrong or is breaking the law, or doesn't care about people and they deserve to be sued?


     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Thanks for the info, Alf. 
    I've always been curious about whether a landlord can really enforce things like that in a lease.  And now that I think of it, I'm going to ask him to enforce it for all the tenants next year!!  DH is the only one who shovels the front walk, so everyone else clearly ignores their leases.  Thank you upstairs neighbor for ignoring your elderly father and super pregnant neighbor.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Michelle, I currently do defense work for employers. OF COURSE I feel that there are many cases that should never have been brought. They are lining my office shelves.  However, people have the right to bring whatever kind of case they want.  It's then either dismissed, settled, or resolved by motion or at trial. That's the system.  There is not enough money in the world to pay me to be on the plaintiff's side of these disputes.

    I said it is illegal to use someone's status as being pregnant or having kids against them in the rental process. Choosing not to rent to them b/c it means you are going to have to delead or deal w/ noise, is, in most instances, illegal. 

    People who don't deserve to get sued, get sued every day.  99% of rental applicants aren't going to sue you.  But it would behoove a landlord to follow the law, or seek legal advice, b/c that 1% can make your life miserable. 
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    There is nothing anywhere that forces a landlord to renew a lease after the term of the lease (usually a year) is up.  If a landlord has issues with the tenant like some of the examples above, there is no reason to continue renting to them.  When the time comes to renew (or not) the lease, the landlord just needs to tell the tenant(s) they don't want to renew for another year and that the tenant should start looking for another place to live. 

    When I hear about people renting to tenants (for whatever reason) and then once the tenants are in the apartment and all kinds of unexpected things pop up and the landlords aren't happy with the situation, yet continue to rent to them for years and years, I can't say I have much sympathy for them. 

    The landlord doesn't have to do a lease at all and can rent "at-will" meaning that with a certain amount of notice (30 days?), the tenant can choose to leave w/no penalty or the landlord can ask the tenant to leave w/no penalty--as I understand it. 

    There may be legal intricacies involved if the landlord chooses not to renew a lease or asks an at-will tenant to leave and the tenant refuses to move out, but in those cases, I think the landlord would have an upper hand if the case went to court.  A hassle, for sure, if it got to that point, but I suspect most tenants would comply with the landlord's wishes and leave as requested.

    None of this addresses the issue of who to rent to/not to rent to and why, but renting to someone doesn't mean that you necessarily have to continue renting to them forever.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Daisy is absolutely correct.

    In fact, I am 90% sure that our landlord will not be renewing our lease when our 2 year lease is up. We have required htem to send HVAC technicians out to service the unit at least 10 times last summer. It's DC and the HVAC needs to work.  A photo of a thermomter showing a 95degree temp and 90% humidity in the upstairs bedrooms did the trick. I have no idea how they lived in the unit before they moved.  It will be a pain to move but we will do it w/o complaint. I'm kind of looking forward to it.  We now know to test the HVAC system before we sign a lease.

    We console outselves w/ the fact that we did not buy this place, but can leave as soon as our lease is up.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Interesting post.  My DH and I also have an apartment in Boston that we rent out.  It was my first apartment, and rather than sell it in a down market we decided to rent it out after moving ourselves out to the burbs a few years ago.  We've only been doing it for a little while, but have learned that we must be extremely careful in how we conduct business as landlords.  Whoever said it was right, MA definitely favors the tenant and as I understand it (ALF correct me if I'm wrong) it is triple damages to the tenant if you, as a landlord, get it wrong.  We live in an extremely litigious society, so I would not put it past anyone to sue over anything.

    There is plenty of old stock housing out here with lead paint.  It's a fact.  But I'm not sure why any tenant would want to move into an apartment and then require the landlord to delead it.  It is a huge disruption (not to mention expensive).  I would certainly look for a rental that is newer (post 1978) if that is an issue for you, as a renter.  I don't think though, that you are required to delead as soon as a tenant with a child younger than 6 moves in, but I believe you are if they ask you.  I could be wrong on that.

    In addition, there are many qualified applicants out there, and I would not be so quick to think that a landlord might be denying you the apartment simply because you are pregnant.  It might just be luck of the draw.  If you are looking at desirable apartments, they will go fast.  Last time we rented ours, we had 5 potential renters come in one night to view the apartment and had a deposit that night. 

    Oh, and Lemon, what a sweet story about you and your North End landlord!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from dotgirl3. Show dotgirl3's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Trouble, You have 30 days to delead.  The parents cannot waive it either.

     
    Here is the form that all tenants and landlords must sign

    Here is where you can look up to see if a property is deleaded.

    Also, owners of a two-family home can refuse to rent to certain protected classes provided that they did not openly market the property.  Otherwise they can only screen tenants based on financial qualifications and rental history.

    If landlords advertise a property for rent or if it is 3 or more units there is no room to disqualify tenants based on a protected class.  

    If you go to housing court, be aware, there are dozens of tenant advocates literally waiting at the door of the courtroom willing to help the tenants for free so you better have a good housing attorney represent you.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bethers97. Show Bethers97's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    I had a follow up question to this posting.  I am about to renew my lease and just started my second trimester.  I inquired after lead paint in the house and the landlord said there "probably" was.  I have no desire to move, but would of course like to have the property inspected for lead. 

    Given that we are about to renew our lease (I have it in hand) and we have been tenants since 2007, is there any reason that if we request the lead inspection, that our landlord could refuse the renewal?

    I appreciate any help.  (This stressor has caused me to go into crying overdrive!)

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Unless your infant is going to eat the paint, you have nothing to worry about. There is no danger bringing a child into a dwelling that has lead paint on the walls. They have to ingest it for a problem to occur.  You have plenty fo time to investigate the lead issue, contact inspectors and work out a solution.  You fall under the same laws for renewing a lease as you do for a new lease.  GL. 
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    I agree with ALF.  Lead was in ALL paint when we were kids.  As long as the kid doesn't chew on painted window sills you're all set.  I know I didn't, and I don't know anyone whose sills were chewed by any creature other than a dog...but, I suppose it could happen.  Honestly, though, I wouldn't even consider moving just because of that.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Daisy75. Show Daisy75's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Just an added piece of information about lead paint--and more for information/evaluation purposes than to scare you.  Yes, eating it is bad.  (Lead paint apparently tastes sweet, which is why kids eat it.)  BUT one thing I found out when we bought a house built in 1930 is that the main thing to be concerned about regarding lead is old windows and painted trim/door jambs.  Sometimes they are harboring small particles that can aerolsolize as the window is being raised/lowered or the doors are opened/closed.  Inhaling the particles is also bad. 

    In the case of our house, we have never tested for lead paint and we have 2 2 year olds.  The lead status of our house is still officially "unknown."  Our house has 3 additions that were put on in the 1980s, so everything in those parts of the house are fine.  Square footage-wise, those additions are approximately 1/2 of our house.  In the "original" house, all of the windows were replaced within the last 10 - 15 years...so, no concerns there.  All of the doors/trim were replaced around the same time, so again, no concerns with that.  The walls themselves had been painted by the previous owner who had bought the house in the early 90s and I'm sure the owner who did the additions would have painted at some point in the late 70s/early 80s as well.  And, we did a ton of painting when we moved in.  Therefore, even if there had been lead paint on the walls at some point, it has been covered by a few coats of latex paint.  So, our "risk assessment" of our house is "low."

    If you look around at the interior of your apartment and see that the windows appear to be original or pre-197x (can't remember the exact year lead paint was outlawed), or if the walls look like they have lead paint on them (lead paint looks different than latex paint...hard to explain, but anyone who grew up in an old house could probably identify it) AND you see areas where the paint has chipped or could be easily chipped off, THEN, maybe you should be concerned.  But if you have newer windows, the walls have been painted since the 1970s, etc. and the place in in generally good shape, then realistically, the risks of lead poisoning are very low.

    As far as your landlord's "probably" response, if the house/building was built before 197x, it probably does have a layer or 2 or more of lead paint.  The important thing isn't whether it's there, it's the likelihood of it being ingested or inhaled.

    Try to do an objective assessment of the risk and decide from there whether it's worth it to push the issue with the landlord.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ladyboston. Show ladyboston's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    I grew up in a house with lead paint my whole childhood life, obvisouly I did not gnaw on the window sills or eat the paint chips but my brother and I are perfectly fine health wise. I am currently 6 months pregnant and having the most difficult time finding a 2 bedroom de-leaded apartment in the city. We have to remain city residents due to my partners job, and we ideally would like to stay in the neighborhood we live in now but there is absolutely nothing available. I have contacted several real estate agents and they have told me that besides being very little help to me that there are about 15 units in Boston that are 2 bedroom and de-leaded and most of them are in East Boston (which would be fine but I work off the masspike so that would be 4 tolls a day for me, 5 days a week) or in areas of Dorchester or Roxbury that we specifically said we did not want to reside in. I have been searching since about March and I am at my wits end! Our goal was to be in a new apartment by the 1st of July but that has come and gone, I really do not know what to do anymore, I am sick of being ignored by agents and seeing the same ads and scams on craigslist everyday. I just wish that we could move outside the city maybe to Quincy or Dedham because they seem to have more options. Does anyone know of any word of mouth landlords that are renting a two bedroom de-leaded apartment? And I am so sorry for the rant- I just had to vent!!!!

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    I don't know who is currently managing it, but I lived at 1950 Commonwealth Avenue in Brighton in the mid-late 1990s. They have numerous deleaded apts.  It's actually 2 adjoining buildings 1940 and 1950 Comm Ave.  They may have gone condo by now, but they were deleading when people were vacating.  GL.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    LadyBoston,

    Most landlords will not advertise their apartment as deleaded, and honestly, your realitor sounds a bit looney for suggesting that every unit in Boston (other than 15 in East Boston) has lead paint.  So many apartments have been gut rehabed since the 80s.  This means doors, windows, etc. were changed out and as Daisy said, this eliminates most of the problem.  I wouldn't be too concerned unless you go to a place that seems to have degenerating paint.  Flakey, etc. 

    I live in a 225 year old house with my husband and 14 month old daughter and a second on the way next month.  We also haven't tested for lead, but we'd be ignorant to think that there isn't lead paint in the house.  My daughter was tested for lead when she turned 1 year old and scored incredibly low.  So the mere presence of lead paint does not necessarly indicate a problem.  Just use your best judgement, keep clean and dust free, wash hands, etc.

    Good luck.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from stefani2. Show stefani2's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    (maybe a stupid question) - if you paint over every inch of paint in your house/apt - does that protect you from any remnants of old lead paint?

    question aside, i think we should all take a deep breath and chill - we all grew up with lead paint and we're OK!  ;)

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trouble30. Show Trouble30's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Stef, I've actually done a lot of research on this since I live in an old house.  Technically, you need to use an encapulent first, which needs to be applied at a certain thickness, then paint over it.  This is in lieu of stripping all old paint.  And this is also to meet EPA (? not sure if i remember correctly what agency regulates this) standards.  Is it necessary?  Not sure, but when we moved in, even before the kids came, I started doing this.  I use a product called child guard.  Super easy compared to stripping!

    And as to your second question - how much smarter could mankind have been if not for leaded everything?  Pipes, paint, etc., etc.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from ladyboston. Show ladyboston's posts

    Re: TIPS FOR RENTING APT WHILE EXPECTING

    Thanks everyone! I just feel the pressure is on since I am entering my third trimester, and I dont want to be those parents who have nothing set up for baby since we found an apartment the week before it came! Hopefully everything falls into place, thanks again!
     
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