For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ilovebeagles. Show ilovebeagles's posts

    For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Hi guys,
    I have a very general, sure to have varied reponse question.
    My possible/diagnosed fertility problems have been an issue since I was about 17. In a nutshell, I dont ovulate on my own and I have very low progesterone levels. I have been on BC since 17 for this. At 27, the doc had me go off BC for four months, so they could do a new "adult" hormone panel. The hope was that my body would correct itself as I got into mature womanhood. 
    Same story, didnt get my period for 4 months (hey no complaints there)

    So, I have been diagnosed as possible PCOS. The doctors say they wont classify me as a fertility issue and will keep me as "possible" infertility because my DH and I havent actually tried for kids yet. 

    My question really is this - Did anyone who had advance notice of possible fertility issues feel a lot of pressure to speed up their timeline for kids? I almost feel like waiting, when I know it wont happen immediately, is stupid. BUT, I am not ready for kids yet. 
    DH is 30, I am 29, DH is in the middle of a career change, but we have a house, a dog, etc. It's really emotionally we are not ready. Plus, my siblings arent married yet, and I would like us to be somewhere in the timeline with us, so our kids can play, etc. We want to travel a bit more, been married 2+ years already. 
    Coming from yourself, not so much outside parties. 

    The docs keep saying - wait until you are ready, then we will figure it out. But, I always had 32/33 as a timeline for kids. I know how quickly that can jump to 35 when you tackle IVF/IUI. We definitely want 2+ kids. 

    This is really a question to make myself feel better! Lol, I feel like I am making myself nuts, and totally acting worst-case scenario. 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Lots to consider, but imho, the greatest factor is that you and DH, you have stated outright, are not ready for kids.  If you have unprotected sex, even with a fertility issue, you can get pregnant right out of the gate, and if you are honestly not ready, you must prevent it.

    Yes, this throws off your "perfect" timeline.  But, how much more thrown off would you be by having your first baby 9 months from now.  That's the real question.

    GL!!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ilovebeagles. Show ilovebeagles's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I know! We definitely arent planning on soon - but I always worry waiting until 32/33 is too late. I was thinking of advancing the timeline to 30.5/31, to build in the 6 month timeline we need to try before medical intervention. 
    The years go by so quickly when you say ok, 6 months, then IUI takes usually 3-4 cycles at 2-3 months a pop, then IVF, then add 9 months to cook the baby on top of that

    I think I am just stressing myself out about things I cant possiby predict. It doesnt help I was in Target getting a baby gift for a friend, and I cried. lol 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Yes, the older you get the worse any infertility issues will be because eggs don't age gracefully - that's just a fact all of us have to deal with.  But, having a baby before you actually want one trumps that imo.  No need to make it harder than it is IF you truly know for sure you're not ready right now.  You have to assume you'll get pg right away when you start trying.

    Instead of a timeline, how about framing it like this.  Put "evaluate having kids 'now'" on the calendar at 6 month intervals.  Life does really change a lot in six months, and if you schedule talks about it twice a year, you'll know when to start trying.  Or, every 4 months so it's 3 times a year.  

    Age is a factor in fertility, but as far as your whole life goes, it's the least important detail there is to consider imo.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Hi Beagles,

    I agree wholeheartedly with what Kar has said.  My question, though, is where is the pressure coming from?  Are you imposing it on yourself because of your timeline, and your thoughtst that you will need full intervention, or is it coming from family, friends, etc? 

    If it is someone on the outside, its really none of thier business.  If it is you - cut yourself some slack and wait until you are ready.  Its OK not to be ready even though you think you should at this point in your life.   When you are ready, go for it.  You don't know what will happen.  You may concieve naturally and quickly, or you may need full intervention.   Cross that bridge when you get to it.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from clc51510. Show clc51510's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I love Kar's second post.  I think that really gives you a good plan for the upcoming months/years. 

    Another thing to think about might be why you aren't ready for kids.  For instance, for me it was getting a new job with more flexibility and for my DH it was buying a house prior to TTC.  We knew those were two goals that we needed to accomplish in order to feel comfortable with TTC.  We completed both of those goals in December of last year and started TTC in the spring.  I think the biggest part for us to verbalize what we needed to do in our lives before we were ready to TTC.

    Best of luck with any decisions you make in the future!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ilovebeagles. Show ilovebeagles's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    No, it is definitely coming from me. I think it's because I always like to have a project. Now, I know kids are a lifetime, not a project, but you can see what I am saying.
    Get good grades in HS, go to good college.Get good grades in college, go to law school. Finish Law school, must pass bar, must get job. 
    Get engaged, must plan wedding, get married. Get dog. Live in city, look for house. Buy house, renovate house. My type A personality needs to learn to enjoy life! Plus, now my friends are starting to have kids, and I am focused on babies in multiple ways. 

    Yeah, we get the whole - when are you having kids - questions from family, friends and strangers. My response has always been - in a couple of years. My parents are not pressuring us at all - neither are the in-laws. 
    My job is great for kids - I am a government lawyer - tons of sick time that can be used for kids, lots of vacation time, home by 5. 
    DH is in the middle of becoming a teacher (career change)- he will be done by june, so thats also great for kids. Our house is renovated, after 6+ months of hard work. 

    But, I think the internal pressure is also coming from - what if i regret not starting earlier? What if I have tons of problems and I miss my chance?
    Bottom line - cant live life like that!!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Ahhhhh, beagles - another type-A laywer. It all makes sense to me now!  Like looking in a mirror, except you have way better hours than I do (jealous!!). Why didn't you just say that from the start?  I totally get it now...

    You fear regret, and possible failure.  Failure is not your style, and you've never not accomplished something you set out to do, right?  I'm the same way, and am acutally facing this right now. 

    I had a timeline, too - married by 26, kids by 28.  LAw school pushed that back a little and it became married at 27, kids by 29.  At 29, DH & I just weren't ready.  I wanted to get established and had things I wanted to do.  I was 31 when I finally went off the pill, and figured I'd get pg with no problem.  Well, now it has been a year, and I am dreading calling for my RE consultation because as much as I want a child (hopefully 2), part of me fears it will result in an ultimate diagnosis that I cannot have kids, leaving me with an unfishished and unfinishable "task" (for lack of a better word).  Unheard of for me, the typical type-A.

    Sometimes I wonder if I waited too long, or should have tried sooner, but really I realize that I wasn't ready for it any sooner and it would have stressed me out more to have a baby when I felt unprepared, than it does now to face what I may or may not have to do to have a baby.  I know that when I do have a baby, I am prepared to give it the life I wanted to give it, because I did all of those things I wanted to do beforehand. 

    You and I are trained to think of the "what ifs" and worst case scenarios - occupational hazard.  You are right though, that we can't live life like that.  We just need to handle one day, and one task, at a time, and takes things as they come.  Its very hard to give up that control, though. 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Another thought about putting the discussions on the calendar - journal your thoughts as a couple at each discussion point so you can identify trends in your thought process.  You might assume you'll just remember, but life is funny that way.  Seeing it in black and white in your own handwriting has a power that no memory of a discussion has.  Journaling will also help you crystalize your thoughts at the time, too.  If you have to write it down you have to really dig deep into how you feel and verbalize it to each other.

    Another thought I had was that assuming you'll want a child someday is a far cry from knowing you want a child.  Be sure before you TTC since you probably don't want that decision made for you by a BFP that comes before you've actually decided that's what you and DH want.

    ETA:  If you have "tons of problems" you'd probably have them anyway, no matter when you start TTC, unless you wait a really long time.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ilovebeagles. Show ilovebeagles's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I love that idea Kar, of chronicling the thought process. What a cool idea to think about looking back on it in 20 years or so?

    Novembride - you hit the nail on the head, and I completely agree with everything you said, particularly the fear of making mistakes....it is like looking in a mirror, lol!
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    You can add me to the Fear of Making Mistakes Club.  I've made a lot of mistakes, ironically, because of it and caused goodness knows how many migraines.

    I journaled when I was going through my divorce to prove to myself in a concrete way that life was getting better (I doubted it would, actually, lol).  Eventually, I could measure my progress in terms of how many "bad" words there were per entry - it decreased every time as did my use of capital letters and explanation points, but, of course, I didn't notice those trends as they were occurring.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from KMMZ1012. Show KMMZ1012's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I was diagnosed PCOS and endometriosis.  Like you, I did birth control from 17 on.  I went off at 29.  My plan was always to have a baby by the time I was 30.  But my period stopped coming and a year after I went off the pill, I was only getting my period sporadically, if at all.  And I definitely wasn't getting pregnant.

    I don't regret my timeline being delayed at all.  It gave me time to make a career change of my own, time to enjoy being married.  And I only had to do 2 rounds of fertility drugs (not IVF, just a couple rounds of clomid) before I found out I was pregnant.  My baby is 2 now.  I had him a month and a half before I turned 32.

    The good news is, after I stopped BF'ing, my period went to normal.  30-40 days.  I'm not nearly as worried about trying for number 2 as I was about conceiving the first one.  I realize now, that setting 30 as a goal was more about family and societal expectations of me than any sort of readiness.  I was much more prepared - emotionally, financially - to bring DS into the world as a slightly older mom than I had planned.

    You have to do what's best for you and for your husband.  If you don't feel ready to have kids yet, don't push it because you're worried about the additional time it may take to have them.  The additional time may just be what you need to feel serene and ready when your little one finally does arrive.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Redsoxfan76. Show Redsoxfan76's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I can't relate to fertility problems or to Type A personalities but I do have one tiny piece of...not really advice, but something I have learned.  In my opinion - the person who is 'ready' to have kids is very rare! Children, and the way they change your life, cannot be planned for. I wasn't emotionally ready, so to speak, up until DD popped out, and I was 34, married, had a very stable job, the house in the 'burbs, etc. But, as soon as it happens, you are ready and nothing else is ever going to trump that feeling.

    Good luck - as others have said, do what is best for you. But try not to overthink it! Sounds so stressful, which is not going to help you conceive. :)
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I think that's true - there's no perfect time to have kids.  

    But, having kids isn't the best idea for everyone and sometimes people say, "We're not ready," when they mean, "We're not sure we want kids."  Those folks should not try to have a baby before they know for sure they really want one.  Or, as Murphey's Law would have it, they'd get pregnant the first time they tried and then, boom, decision made.  Would they cope?  Sure.  Would they love their child?  Of course.  

    There are studies that show that a surprising number of couples secretly resent their kids for "ruining" their previously perfect lives.  I wonder if those were people who got, "Hey, nobody ever feels ready," for advice when they said they weren't ready and went for it, anyway.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    In Response to Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?:
    [QUOTE]There are studies that show that a surprising number of couples secretly resent their kids for "ruining" their previously perfect lives.  I wonder if those were people who got, "Hey, nobody ever feels ready," for advice when they said they weren't ready and went for it, anyway.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    This is a slight tangent, but I think a bigger problem is that family and friends often don't want to take a person (especially a woman) seriously when she/he says "I don't want kids." I can't tell you how often I've heard someone say that and get a response of "oh, you'll change your mind!" or "how awful!" or "you don't mean it." I wonder if that constant pressure does get the better of them.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from siena09. Show siena09's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?


    My 2 cents is that I would definitely consider these health factors in deciding when to TTC.  With that said, I wouldn't try to get pregnant before I felt like I was in an emotionally and financially stable point in my life and my relationship with my husband so that I had all of my resources possible to handle the new challenges of pregnancy and childcare.  

    For me, I had no reason to anticipate fertility issues, but even without that I feel like it would be sort of selfish (not sure that's the right word) for me to wait too too long to have kids, given that I feel confident that I can meet the emotional and financial stability criteria earlier.  The risks of complications go up very quickly as we all know--from 1 in 1200 risk of Down's at 25, to 1 in 400 at 35.  THe risk of miscarriage goes up quite a lot too, and is about double for women who are 35-45 rather than 25-35... (And having recently had a miscarriage, I can say that the experience is traumatic and I would very much like to do what I can to reduce the risk.) And the age pressure means you have less time to be patient and try again, if necessary.

    None of this is to say that women who are 35, 40+ shouldn't have kids--absolutely not!  Just that for me, given that I felt like I could support a child earlier (now in my late 20s), I didn't feel that I could justify waiting.  This is DESPITE the fact that would almost surely be career benefits to me of delaying children.  I fully understand that for other people, the pieces may not fall in place until later, and ultimately everyone has to make their own decision about when they are "ready"--at least as they will ever be!  

    I think the biggest thing is that unlike many other things in life, we have a lot less control over fertility than we might like.  I, for one, had identified the perfect 6-month window to have a baby based on significant career constraints from both me and my DH. (Yes, I'm a notorious planner as well.) We were lucky with the TTC part, but then miscarried at 12 weeks...  My window is gone, and now I'm trying to decide whether to ignore my own career constraints and "risk" having a baby soon after starting a new job, or to wait longer, for a moment that will be better for me but guarantee my husband has less time to spend with the baby. There truly is no perfect time. And of course, no one can guarantee that the next pregnancy will be healthy, so there is that stress and uncertainty added to the mix.

    My point is just that this process doesn't lend itself to planners like us, and at some point I think we have to decide to let go of the illusion of control and see what comes. Maybe it's good practice for having kids.  :)

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    In Response to Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?:
    [QUOTE]I can't relate to fertility problems or to Type A personalities but I do have one tiny piece of...not really advice, but something I have learned.  In my opinion - the person who is 'ready' to have kids is very rare! Children, and the way they change your life, cannot be planned for. I wasn't emotionally ready, so to speak, up until DD popped out, and I was 34, married, had a very stable job, the house in the 'burbs, etc. But, as soon as it happens, you are ready and nothing else is ever going to trump that feeling. Good luck - as others have said, do what is best for you. But try not to overthink it! Sounds so stressful, which is not going to help you conceive. :)
    Posted by Redsoxfan76[/QUOTE]

    Excellent post Sox!  Reminds me of when we got our dog.  We were  ready, and felt totally prepared - until he got here and turned our whole world upside down.  I was a sleep-deprived, emotional, nervous wreck (the total opposite of my usually calm and collected perosnality) suddenly responsible for the life of another living creature.  But, it was what we wanted, and we got through it and now we are all a happy little family that I wouldn't trade for anything.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Tangerine5. Show Tangerine5's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    beagles, your health situation sounds very similar to mine (did you get your period late, by any chance?). I was never diagnosed with anything 'til we started TTC, but I was almost 16 when I got my period, and had very long and irregular cycles. Went on bcp for 10 years and forgot that I'd ever had a cycle regularity issue. I went off bcp as soon as I turned 31 - DH and I were more than ready to start trying, after conquering struggles with unemployment, etc. My period never showed up, so after 3 months, my ob induced it with Provera and referred me to an RE. They determined that I had low progesterone and was ovulating very irregularly or not at all. Fast-forward 4 cycles of clomid and 2 injectible cycles - bfp just before I turned 32!

    A couple of thoughts:

    - since you have a known fertility issue, I don't think you'll have to wait the standard 6 months before getting medical intervention, if you don't want to. If your period returns and you're ovulating, then by all means - but don't feel like you'll have to build that 6 months into your timeline if you don't want to.

    - if I could do it all over again - and this is just me - I would have stopped birth control much earlier than I did. It was masking my problem and it took forever to get AF after I stopped it. It sounds like you're well aware of your issues and would probably stop taking bcp in advance of TTC - but for me, I wish I'd stopped sooner and just used barrier methods 'til we were 100% ready. I probably won't go back on bcp again until we're sure we're done having children.

    - as others have said, it all depends on when you're ready. I'd always said I wanted to be pg by the time I turned 30. Well, life had other plans for us - but as soon as I turned 31 and we'd cleared the hurdles in our path, I was READY. DH and I knew without a doubt that we wanted a family, and it was just a matter of finding the right time to start. If I'd known that I had these issues and TTC would be a problem, though - I think I would have started the process 6-12 months earlier. I would have at minimum ditched the bcp before we thought we were really ready to start. That's just me, though.

    I think it's good that you're processing all of this and thinking ahead. You still have time - and there are incredible specialists out there who can and will help you if necessary. I absolutely adore my RE and was sad to "graduate" from her practice! GL to you!
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    if your DH is in the middle of a career change and you are both early 20s, and you aren't ready, just wait.

    I got married at 34 and we started trying right away.  I had no indications that I'd have fertility issues.  I had a MC back in Feb 09 and I've been on BCP for hte last 6 months for other issues.  I'm now 39 and will be 40 in June which is my cut off date. I also won't use fertility medication for philosophical and practical [twins run in the family and my MC was twins] reasons.

    If you are young and aren't ready, wait until you are ready. And make sure htat your 'not ready' feelings aren't second thoughts. I'd like to stop now for a variety of reasons but promised DH until 40. 

    Under 35 with no documented fertility issues, they make you try for 12 months, not 6 like someone had stated.  Your doctor's refusal to label you w/ any kind of fertility issue may hurt you in this respect. But then the simple thing to do to expedite a RE referral if and when you want one is to just tell them you have been trying for X months already.  How can they check?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from MichelleandtheBoys. Show MichelleandtheBoys's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    There's really no right answer for you, because you could get pregnant right away or it could be the ordeal you fear.  I get not being emotionally ready, but the fact that you are so concerned about the right time to do it probably means you'd be able to manage well once it happens.  It's the people that just want to get pregnant without giving any thought to how their lives will change, or how they will afford or care for a child that are more concerning. The commenters who think your hesitation about being ready may really mean you never want to have children must have missed that you said, you "definitely want 2+ kids".  I would wait a little bit, but maybe not quite as long as you had originally planned, because if you are thinking about it this much now, chances are you will be a lot more upset if you are still not pregnant a few years from now, than if it were to happen immediately.

    I was afraid I wouldn't be able to get pregnant, so I sort of convinced myself that maybe we shouldn't have kids, and thought of how simple life would be, and how much money we'd have.  Deep down, I knew that I was just trying to make it less devastating if, in fact, I was not able to have a child.  Once my first son was born, I felt like I was made to be a mother, and was lucky enough to have another 23 months later. My only regret is that we didn't have a third, because I kept thinking I wasn't ready, but now I feel that the kids and I are too old to add another.  

    Anyway... the bottom line is, if you're thinking this much about it, you should just do it because you won't stop worrying until it happens. 

    Good luck either way!
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from misslily. Show misslily's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    I just want to say that you can't always plan these things.  I've known perfectly healthy women who took 11 or 12 months to get pregnant and some who got pregnant the first time without BC.  You never know how it's going to go.
    I didn't even get married until I was 40.  I managed to get pregnant at 42, but miscarried at 12 weeks.  I didn't have my twins (IVF) until I was 45.  I'm the oldest mother I know, but I have my babies - the two best things that ever happened to me.
    Throw out the calendar and when you are ready, start trying.  If you do have PCOS you probably won't have to wait the 6 months to go see the RE and get some help.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    When someone says we definitely want 2 kids but arent' ready yet, it sometimes means that 1 person is not much in the definite camp. DH has no idea I no longer want to keep on trying. It would break his heart if he knew and I agreed to try when we got married. He definitely wants kid; I want DH to be happy.  If you aren't ready for whatever reason, just make sure you are both on teh same page. Not being 'emotionally' or 'financially' ready may be code for "I don't want X".  I'm not saying it does b/c I don't know the OP or her DH from Adam, but it's worth exploring since you are already discussing the issues anyway.  

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    It is so, so hard to not be able to predict/control such a major life-changing event!  It can be helpful to have a "discussion" like this on a forum like this even just to help you get your thoughts down in writing.

    I would ditto those who say if you and DH are not ready for kids, don't try to get pregnant yet.  A very good friend of mine has almost the exact history you have (on the pill at 16/17, PCOS, told there was a good chance she would have significant fertility issues, etc.) and... pregnant on their FIRST try at age 36.  Her DH wasn't quite ready, but because of the "high" potential for fertility issues they decided to "start" trying at that time, and it did cause some bumps along the way for them (his not being ready).  Their son just turned one and I'm *still* not sure he's ready.  So that is why my advice is what it is. 

    Good luck!
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from tomarra. Show tomarra's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Ilove, I agree with everyone else it comes down to when your DH and you are ready.  I also I have similar issues like you and my OBGYN refered me to RE as soon as my cycles got long/painful.  If you have a history of issue prior TTC you can be refered to RE sooner than 6 months if needed.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from LCGCmomma. Show LCGCmomma's posts

    Re: For people who knew they would have issues conceiving - how much extra time to add in timeline?

    Lots of good advice on here about not being able to control things and being "ready" for TTC...I will tell you that I was given a Dx of PCOS at 17 years old after no AF for 6 months+ my senior year in high school. I didn't really mind no AF at the time (wasn't any risk of pregnancy at that point), and I was really stressed with college apps, etc. But I gained almost 50 pounds in a year and was borderline diabetic, etc. due to it. (BTW...It is REALLY hard at 17 to hear that you might not be able to have kids/have trouble with conceiving. At that point, I thought I would probably want kids some day, but mostly I just wanted to still have the option, you know?) I went on BCP and didn't stop taking them until DH and I were TTC (I was 27). My DH didn't want to be "trying", just "letting nature take its course" - not so easy when you know that there may be an underlying issue. I was never told that I "wasn't ovulating" or "couldn't ovulate" on my own, and my OB/GYN said to go off the pills and try it out. She also told me that if I didn't have AF off the pill after 3 months that I needed to come back in to have hormone levels, etc. checked. And that if we went for 6 months with AF but without pregnancy that I also needed to come back in to have things checked out. With PCOS, you may need help with making sure your blood sugar levels aren't an issue, along with hormone levels, weight, etc. so definitely check in with your OB/GYN. Happily for us, AF came 6 weeks after I stopped BCP (totally normal time-frame) and we were pregnant two months later :-) DS is 10 months old now and it was incredible for us to have such an easy time (DH's sister had major fertility issues and did IVF for several years before having her two sons).

    I would definitely talk with your OB/GYN or get a referral to RE as you get closer to being "ready" to try. The timeline of when they would elevate your situation or try different interventions like Clomid, etc. is most likely going to be different than someone with no other history of GYN issues. And that time-frame may help you to move forward with at least not preventing pregnancy. HTH

     

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