Floor in middle of rooms is different than the edges

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from davrmars. Show davrmars's posts

    Floor in middle of rooms is different than the edges

    I have two rooms, dining room and living room, that are about 15 by 12 feet in area.  In both rooms in the middle of the floor, about 6 by 8 feet, the wood floor is different than the edges.  The type of wood is different and the size of the wood is different.  The middle planks are wider than outer planks.  The house was built in 1898 as I guess is a type of colonial.  It almosts looks as if the middle of the floor didn't exist at one point and then was boarded much later.

    My question is why?  Does anyone know why the middle of the floor would be different than the edges?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Jim-in-Littleton. Show Jim-in-Littleton's posts

    Re: Floor in middle of rooms is different than the edges

    The simple answer is "cost".  

    At the time the house was built, area rugs were standard in most rooms in any home.  They installed cheap flooring (usually local pine) in the center of the room and the better stuff (commonly oak or maple) around the perimeter. Then you'd put down an area rug to cover the cheap stuff and only the more expensive stuff would be seen. Why spend a lot of money for expensive flooring that would never be seen?

    (In a few early movies there were scenes where someone would come into a person's house and, when the homeowner would leave the room, the guest would lift the corner of the rug to look at the flooring underneath.  The idea being that if the floor was entirely of "good" flooring, the owner must be well-to-do. If the cheaper stuff was installed then they were typical middle-of-the-road earners or, in some cases, posers...)
     

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