Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from rodman75. Show rodman75's posts

    Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    Is removing the only bathtub in a house (2nd flr) and replacing it with a high end travertine frameless glass stand up shower enclosure a bad idea?  How much, in percentages, would that affect the asking price of a house?  Again, the remodel would be high end: exquisite natural stone travertine, vanity replaced, radiant flooring, recessed lights, crown molding, sconces, smoothed out ceiling, new bath accessories throughout,thick frameless glass shower enclosure (no builder grade glass surround), toilet, etc BUT one could no longer take a bath.  Is that a deal breaker, if and when I ever go to sell the house in middle income suburbia (450-600k price range neighborhood)  Your thoughts?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from shiplesp. Show shiplesp's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    It wouldn't bother me, because I don't like baths.  But I know a lot of people who would find it a deal-breaker.  And in that price range, I think people would expect a tub in at least one bathroom.  (Think about your potential buyers - if they are likely to have kids, they'll want a tub.)  So, I think it's risky.  And you probably won't get your money back from the renovation, since you may have to compromise on your price when you go to sell.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from JStineRE. Show JStineRE's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    Take it from a Realtor, it hurts you more than it helps. You could line the shower in rare gemstones and plate the toilet in gold, but you'd still be eliminating a basic bathroom attribute that buyers EXPECT in their homes. I've consulted on many renovation projects and have run into this many times. Your best bet is to replace the tub with a jetted one, upgrade the fixtures/toilet/vanity/tile with something high end/modern that a buyer would truly appreciate. This is your best option to recoup your investment dollars on the selling end. Good luck. 

    -Jeff Stineback
    Prudential Unlimited
    617-947-0109
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from cleareyesfullheart. Show cleareyesfullheart's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    If you have a bath somewhere else in you house go for it. I would love a bath and a shower like you described.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from rodman75. Show rodman75's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    thanks for the helpful remarks!!  Currently, we have a 1.5 bath garrison colonial with no intention of selling.  Our first floor bath has the washer/dryer set-up.  Although we don't plan on selling, one never knows what the future will bring.  Before I'd go to sell, or when children come along for us someday, we'd remove the first floor laundry and install a tub/shower stall.  I think that would make up for the lack of the 2nd floor tub. 
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JStineRE. Show JStineRE's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    Rodman75,

    Speaking from experience, adding a first floor bathtub to a house with the bedrooms on the second floor can often prove very awkward to a whole host of potential buyers out there. Sure your not moving anytime soon, but it is something to ALWAYS consider when renovating. Because it will be more of a "bonus" to have a tub in the house, the location of the first floor makes it odd for certain scenarios, like with guests and overall practicality. Also, installing a tub where ONLY a 1/2 bath should be can often have the perception of being "out of place" and awkward. IMO, unless you have a very unique setup in your current home, you will spend a good deal of money, and won't increase your value much at all. Just a few thoughts...

    Cheers.

    -Jeff Stineback
    Prudential Unlimited
    617-947-0109
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from rodman75. Show rodman75's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    Thanks Jeff,

    That makes a lot of sense.   Aside from the obvious cost expense, what do you think about someday adding a full bath to the basement area?  Our basement is completely finished (walkout basement, new berber, tiles & new drop ceiling).  Would that make more sense than adding it to a first floor laundry / half bath. 

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from JStineRE. Show JStineRE's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    Rodman75,

    Basement baths are an interesting thing. Because of the high plumbing cost ($5000+ in some cases), it can be a big expense that is hardly ever utilized/rightfully incorporated. Sure your house will look better on paper with 2.5 baths, and will prob lure more buyers as such, but the basement function has just as much to do with it. If you add a bath down there, I would make sure you designate it a particular type of room at the same time (i.e. Media Room, Guest Room w/full bath, Au Pair suite, etc.). Basement value is a really weird/hard thing to determine these days because it can be so subjective, but things like Home Theater rooms are really popular and CAN give you a nice edge in market comparisons. 

    Any chance of building an inexpensive addition to house a master bath? This sort of thing would be the best value expense. 

    Cheers.

    -Jeff Stineback
    Prudential Unlimited
    617-947-0109 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from rodman75. Show rodman75's posts

    Re: Removing bathtub for high end stand up shower bad idea?

    Jeff,

    Thanks again for the sound advice.  My basement is completely finished with a room that I will be using as a media room or fourth bedroom.  It has a large closet and a window, however the window is set up high and one could never escape through it if a fire were to start.  So I'm not sure if that could be considered a legal fourth bedroom.  Either way, I'll eventually look into adding a full bath in the basement someday.  I have the space and I agree that removing the first floor laundry would not be the best idea.  I think an addition is out of the question right now.  It would be too costly, plus I think they throw off the look of some houses (not all, some are done very well).   Thanks again for your insider pov. 

     

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