a positional question

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from fanonymost. Show fanonymost's posts

    a positional question

    only ever played pick-up street hockey as a kid on LI, so some experienced input on an issue with the Bruins that I have been kicking around in my mind would be appreciated


    as I see it, the Bs have only one top-13 winger (Iginla) with a right-handed shot ... anyone see this as a disadvantage? might guys like Eriksson & Smith be more productive skating on the left side?   

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lex44. Show Lex44's posts

    Re: a positional question

    In response to fanonymost's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    only ever played pick-up street hockey as a kid on LI, so some experienced input on an issue with the Bruins that I have been kicking around in my mind would be appreciated

     

    as I see it, the Bs have only one top-13 winger (Iginla) with a right-handed shot ... anyone see this as a disadvantage? might guys like Eriksson & Smith be more productive skating on the left side?   

    [/QUOTE]

    I think that's a very good point. I was going to bring that Up but I figured the boys on here would tear me apart for making that observation.  

     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from DaveyN. Show DaveyN's posts

    Re: a positional question

    In response to Lex44's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to fanonymost's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    only ever played pick-up street hockey as a kid on LI, so some experienced input on an issue with the Bruins that I have been kicking around in my mind would be appreciated

     

    as I see it, the Bs have only one top-13 winger (Iginla) with a right-handed shot ... anyone see this as a disadvantage? might guys like Eriksson & Smith be more productive skating on the left side?   

    [/QUOTE]

    I think that's a very good point. I was going to bring that Up but I figured the boys on here would tear me apart for making that observation.  

    [/QUOTE]

    Ive brought up wanting to see Eriksson on the LW before.  He was generally playing on the LW in Dallas if im not mistaken.  Would love to see them bring in a right handed shot for the RW, but who and at what cost?

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from asmaha. Show asmaha's posts

    Re: a positional question

    Eriksson was mostly a LW for Dallas, but shifted for Boston due to need. Marchand, Kelly, Soderberg, Smith, Lucic all left-hand shots, and Loui had the greatest ability to play of his traditional off-wing.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from bostonfan191646. Show bostonfan191646's posts

    Re: a positional question

    Which way a player shoots matters much more for d men. Much much more. Some wingers have trouble on their backhand breaking out of the zone, but if they can do it it's not an issue. Where the bruins could use some right handed shots is on the powerplay 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pucman. Show pucman's posts

    Re: a positional question

    I believe the Erikkson-Orbik incident was a result of playing on the off wing. The same pass with a righty would of been accepted with his back to the D or 90 deg. to him, not straight ahead looking behind. Coming out of the D zones a lot more difficult, specially to gather speed then entering the O zone playing your off wing. Then going into the corners you have trouble having to play everything off your backhand facing the boards. I,m old school on this, thinking it to be,  excuse me, "European" Just think of Neely the hard charging, shoot over the blueline, go into the corners coming out quick ready to pass or shoot. Your proto typical RW. Then Erikkson who plays the cute little pass with his back to the boards & then breaking off it. Covering the puck in the corner making a play off the scrum. I think there is a difference.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from jmwalters. Show jmwalters's posts

    Re: a positional question

    In response to bostonfan191646's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Which way a player shoots matters much more for d men. Much much more. Some wingers have trouble on their backhand breaking out of the zone, but if they can do it it's not an issue. Where the bruins could use some right handed shots is on the powerplay 

    [/QUOTE]


    Unless you are a one-eyed Swede of course.....

     

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: a positional question

    In response to bostonfan191646's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Which way a player shoots matters much more for d men. Much much more. Some wingers have trouble on their backhand breaking out of the zone, but if they can do it it's not an issue. Where the bruins could use some right handed shots is on the powerplay 

    [/QUOTE]

    Dur.

    Playing the off-wing makes a big difference.  All passes are received on the backhand.  Adjustments have to be made for pucks coming up or around the boards.  For any shot, the body must be turned.  Stickhandling leaves the puck close to the opponent.  Off wing is good for powerplay situations as it gives the player more net to shoot at, but in general play right handed shots on the right side have it much easier than left handed shots on the right side.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pucman. Show pucman's posts

    Re: a positional question

    Are you OK "NAS"?  We actually agree on something?  Yes!!!!!!  Cheers my friend!

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from SanDogBrewin. Show SanDogBrewin's posts

    Re: a positional question

    I would be pretty shocked if PC didn't move contract or two out to get a right-handed shot to Boston.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bookboy007. Show Bookboy007's posts

    Re: a positional question

    It matters, but some players are actually more effective playing the traditional off wing because of it.  You have a better angle on the forehand off the off-wing, and passes for one-timers or quick bang-bang wristers put the player's body between the pass and the defender.  Near the goal line, it's easier to jam the puck with strength rather than stuff/push it, especially when playing perpendicular to the goal-line or facing out toward the circles or the points.  It makes cross-ice passes easier to jam home because the target is a few feet farther out from the goalie.

    Depends on the player which is the greater advantage.  Messier used to gravitate to the off wing on the rush because he had that great snapper.

     

     

    Are you not entertained?!?!

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from BigBadnBruin. Show BigBadnBruin's posts

    Re: a positional question

       Didn't the Soviet Red Army always have ALL left-handers, at every position?

    Didn't seem to hurt them.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from jmwalters. Show jmwalters's posts

    Re: a positional question

    In response to BigBadnBruin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

       Didn't the Soviet Red Army always have ALL left-handers, at every position?

     

    [/QUOTE]

    an ideological thing....

     

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from OatesCam. Show OatesCam's posts

    Re: a positional question

    Which wing you prefer often depends much more on your style of play and vision than which hand you use.  Think for a moment about how most people in the world are right-handed, but hockey players tend to be split 50:50 left:right.  That means that a lot of left shots are actually right-handed people.  Looking deeper into this, that likely means that most left shots actually have vision dominated by their right eye (if they were shooting a rifle, they would look down the barrel with their right eye).

    As such many left shots see the ice better on the right side - and some righties fit better on the left.  Many great players, both forward and D, have played their off side.  Ray Bourque, Rocket Richard, Pavel Bure... the list goes on and on.

    Personally as a player who played a lot of hockey, I didn't care much about what position I played.  I mostly resided at center, but if I played wing I preferred the right even though I shoot left.  Learning to take a pass on your backhand is pretty easy, and being able to shoot one-timers or lean back to keep passing options open is great.  It's a little harder to go wide, but you can compensate by going one handed with the puck.  There's pros and cons to either side but they tend to offset each other. The only thing that really matters is where a player feels comfortable and how they see the ice.

    In the case of the Bruins, it is a bit of an issue having all left-shots on wings.  Not because they aren't comfortable there - Smith seems much stronger on the right and Eriksson looks fine either way - but because it makes the attack approach a bit predictable.  More importantly, the lack of right shots to play the LEFT side on the powerplay could take away an option.  It's bit offset by having two right-hand shot centers, however.

     

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