backyard rink question

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    backyard rink question


    Any of you know the answer to this - or point me to a more appropriate place to ask this question?

    I've made a backyard rink a few years now, I have a huge white trap, I bang stakes into the ground and I had some left over plywood just 12 inches high that acts as short boards and holds the tarp to contain the water/ice.

    Here's the question - I'd like to cover the exposed tarp so that when I shovel it or when pucks hit it, it doesn't get cut.

    How?  If I use wood it is going to splinter and get water logged.

    I'd also want to do it cheap.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from shuperman. Show shuperman's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Bad,

    Sounds like you are taking up a project I plan on doing in a few yrs.  If you check youtube or google it there are numerous ways to build an outdoor rink. 

    Good luck.  I will be checking in to see how you made out. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    In Response to Re: backyard rink question:
    [QUOTE]Bad, Sounds like you are taking up a project I plan on doing in a few yrs.  If you check youtube or google it there are numerous ways to build an outdoor rink.  Good luck.  I will be checking in to see how you made out. 
    Posted by shuperman[/QUOTE]

    The rink is a blast, under $250 for all the materials.  The cheapest stick and puck is $5 per hour (or so), so it pays for itself over a winter easily.

    The biggest thing is that you have to get dead level ground, I learned my yard is flat - but not level.  Fixing that isn't bad, I have a pickup truck and loam - dirt - is dirt cheap.

    It's this last tricky step that has me - how to protect the exposed edges of the liner along the boards.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from shuperman. Show shuperman's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Good luck my friend. 

    I will be attempting it in a yrs time and may be asking advice.

    Nothing better than a backyard rink. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from bogie6. Show bogie6's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    You might try putting a rim of boards in front of the liner so that the liner passes under the boards, and is secured between two layers of boards thus protecting the liner from skates, sticks etc.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    In Response to Re: backyard rink question:
    [QUOTE]You might try putting a rim of boards in front of the liner so that the liner passes under the boards, and is secured between two layers of boards thus protecting the liner from skates, sticks etc.
    Posted by bogie6[/QUOTE]

    But don't they get waterlogged and chipped?
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    Re: backyard rink question


     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    Re: backyard rink question


    One picture is worth a 1000 words, I think you get the construction idea.

    Yes, the 'zamboni' really is necessary, I have found no way to resurface that works without some towel/cloth whatever to spread the water.  Just throwing water on the rink gives you slush or uneven ice.

    I cut up an old tire and stapled it to my stakes to hold the boards and liner in place when first filling with waetr.

    See what I mean about the exposed liner?
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from matttt87. Show matttt87's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Badhab,

    What about doing the proposal of putting another layer of wood around, but getting something such as a deck finish to make it more water resistant and give it a longer lasting finish. Or on that idea, maybe one some of the fake wood that people use on decks sometimes? (However I have no idea how much it costs)
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Fletcher1. Show Fletcher1's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Looks very cool Badhab.  Kudos.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from legolaspinkerton. Show legolaspinkerton's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    You could use some kind of synthetic would. Trex http://www.trex.com/ is an example. It's made from recycled plastics and such, so it shouldn't get waterlogged or splinter.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from paulyboy. Show paulyboy's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    badhab,

    I built one this year as well and I dont think that there is a solution to what you are looking for.  I was told by many that you will probably only get 1 year out of the liner, maybe 2.  I dont know how you can tack something along the existing liner without puncturing it...  I have overflow of about 2 feet on all sides, but have noticed that the kids have cut some of the sides with skates and shovel... Your looks about the size of mine 36' by 24'.. 
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from paulyboy. Show paulyboy's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    actually one thing you could look at is the boarder patrol pads that are used for the lower levels of kids hockey. We use blocked padding to do cross ice games  so puck does not carry into other games.  The only issues are that they are expensive and you lose the ability to bank the puck off boards when you are playing...
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from adkbeesfan. Show adkbeesfan's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    badhab... where's the snow? i hope your not trying to do this in texas or something!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from No4BobbyOrr-GOAT. Show No4BobbyOrr-GOAT's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Where's the B logo at centre ice.

    Particle or chipboard in sheets 8 x 4 is probably cheapest. Cut the strips in 6-8" widths will give 40 to 48' of linear coverage per sheet. Check all the depots and see who has the cheapest or even go to a new housing development and see what might be available at a cheaper rate(ask, don't 5 finger it, unless of course no one responds when you ask, albeit 2am -lol), some contractors depending on your area and availability will sell for cash and a good rate.  I have seen more lumber material buried that I could have built an extremely large subdivision.

    When ice has frozen, fold the liner down so that your ripped plywood will cover it and screw it to your existing boards, easier to take down to replace or readjust for heights. This board should last longer than you think if applied after rink frozen and kept just above ice line, smaller than stick, skate, shovel(use plastic) or puck so it isn't cut and just above water/ice level.

    Being adjustable will help, as when you have to reflood often the ice will go up, not a lot but over a winter you may have to raise it.

    Also post a sign, no stinking habs allowed.

    Have a good time and call for first night party.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    In Response to Re: backyard rink question:
    [QUOTE]badhab... where's the snow? i hope your not trying to do this in texas or something!
    Posted by adkbeesfan[/QUOTE]

    Sudbury MA - pic taken in Dec, before we got our first little bit of snow.


    Note: the Trex stuff costs a fortune and it weighs tons, I cam into a lot of it and still have some leftover after I buiilt my deck, but no way I'd use it on the rink.

    Sealer on some exterior ply - now there's an idea...



     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from BBReigns. Show BBReigns's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Did you ever think about just laying down some pavment with a curb around it?

    It might be far less labor intensive, especially for annual use, even though it would cost some bucks up front to do it.

    Just a thought.

    I grew up in playing on a rink like that where the curb around the pavement served as the barrier to keep the water trapped. You'd just run a hose the night before and fill er up.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from BadHabitude. Show BadHabitude's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    In Response to Re: backyard rink question:
    [QUOTE]badhab, I built one this year as well and I dont think that there is a solution to what you are looking for.  I was told by many that you will probably only get 1 year out of the liner, maybe 2.  I dont know how you can tack something along the existing liner without puncturing it...  I have overflow of about 2 feet on all sides, but have noticed that the kids have cut some of the sides with skates and shovel... Your looks about the size of mine 36' by 24'.. 
    Posted by paulyboy[/QUOTE]


    This is the second season for this liner, they sell a patch kit for tarps, I'll get a lot of life out of the tarp.

    No logos or blue lines etc., anything dark soaks up the heat and that spot will melt.  You have to go with white.

    I wonder if there is a floor linoleum that I can cut into strips and staple over the liner, if I could find one that doesn't get brittle when it freezes.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from BBReigns. Show BBReigns's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    In Response to Re: backyard rink question:
    [QUOTE]You could use some kind of synthetic would. Trex http://www.trex.com/ is an example. It's made from recycled plastics and such, so it shouldn't get waterlogged or splinter.
    Posted by legolaspinkerton[/QUOTE]


    I wouldn't recommend that because it's a composite which means the properties in the lumber aren't the same as normal wood, mostly because of the plastic. It's about a 50/50 mix.

    It's not meant to be a structural wood.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from adkbeesfan. Show adkbeesfan's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    what about roller hockey in the summer months?- its always more fun to spend other peoples money! 
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from bogie6. Show bogie6's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Trex is good idea, but very expensive. I used hardwood and some pine. Fed the liner under, then over a 2x4 and screwed the inside [ ice side] board to the backboards using 2 inch pieces of hollow metal used to mount gutter nails. This stabilized the wood portions, but also required screws for taking the heavy portions apart at end of season. The ice build-up under the ice-side board protected the liner from cuts. This was in Rochester N.Y. where the temp stayed pretty cold as it  usually snows from early November until the end of March. Mostly lake effect flurries, mixed with some storms.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from bogie6. Show bogie6's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    As an added thought, you might try to find a guy named Vin Godleski. At one time, late 70s, he was a scorekeeper, and penalty box monitor for the New Jersey Devils. He also sold small open or closed rinks. He might be retired and should be in his early 70s himself.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from nitemare-38. Show nitemare-38's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Sick rink Badhab! Awesome zamboni & I'd try & copyright that design! You know what? You could try contacting Rexall Place in Edmonton. Dan Craig doesn't seem to have anything personal, but you could try contacting his home base. Who better than the "ice guru" or a member of his team to help you? Worth a shot @ contacting.

    http://www.northlands.com/userfiles/GuestServicesWebsiteInformation2.pdf
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from BBReigns. Show BBReigns's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    In Response to Re: backyard rink question:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: backyard rink question : If only I had a remote interest in basktball, I could put down asphast and put a curb around that, but we're probably up around 5 grand for that.
    Posted by BadHabitude[/QUOTE]

    Would just matter how much you would use it.  Like someone else said, it becomes a roller hockey venue when it's not cold.

    I mean, if you like to play a lot or have kids who play, it may be a worthwhile thing to do.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from sebagoking. Show sebagoking's posts

    Re: backyard rink question

    Check out www.nicerink.com

    They sell bumper caps and kick plates that will protect the exposed areas of liner above the ice level.  You can find these on their online store link. 

    I've used scraps of carpet with success in the past.
     
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