1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SanDogBrewin. Show SanDogBrewin's posts

    Fluto weighs in on Tyler Seguin extension and "Rich owner, poor example"

    http://bostonglobe.com/sports/2012/08/25/tyler-seguin-expected-get-extension-from-bruins/CGCObmMQaKSuDOWuWxoKQN/story.html

    "The plan emphasized prudence. Earlier this summer, Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli was in no rush to extend Tyler Seguin. Chiarelli wanted the next collective bargaining agreement to be in place before re-signing his young forward. Perhaps under the new CBA, the NHL and the Players Association will agree to place restrictions on second contracts. The second deals have long been prickly matters for GMs, who believe inflation has ballooned their costs.

    In all likelihood, Chiarelli’s plan will hit the trash.According to a team source, Seguin probably will sign an extension before there is a labor agreement. The deal would come in the wake of extensions that Taylor Hall and Jeff Skinner, two other rising stars from the 2010 draft, signed this month.

    Last Wednesday, Hall signed a seven-year, $42 million deal with Edmonton. On Aug. 8, Skinner agreed to a six-year, $34.35 million extension with Carolina. All three players will be entering the final season of their entry-level contracts in 2012-13.

    Chiarelli declined to comment on his shift. Two factors, however, most likely lead the charge: the gulf between the owners and players regarding labor talks, and the precedent set by Hall and Skinner. With the CBA set to expire Sept. 15, there has been little traction between the NHL and NHLPA. Given the extensions signed by two peers, Seguin would prefer security to uncertainty.

    On Dec. 6, Seguin was suspended one game for missing a team breakfast and meeting in Winnipeg. At the time, Bruins bosses were prompt to note it was not the first time that Seguin had had an unexcused absence. Other 20-year-olds have committed bolder offenses. But most 20-year-olds (Seguin will turn 21 on Jan. 31, 2013) don’t make millions.

    The variable that nobody — not GMs, not agents, not scouts — can guarantee is how paydays affect performance. Some players perform better when motivated. Consider Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask. He could have signed a multiyear extension like the one signed by Vancouver’s Cory Schneider (three years, $12 million). Instead, Rask chose a one-year, $3.5 million deal. Provided all goes according to plan, Rask’s next deal will be the big one."

    ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER

    Rich owner, poor example

    Flyers owner Ed Snider is one of the strongmen on the NHL’s board of governors. He is also chairman of Comcast-Spectacor. Snider has granted GM Paul Holmgren the password to his checking account to secure the resources required for a Cup run.

    So you can excuse the NHLPA for raising an eye about part of the NHL’s platform — five-year limits on contracts — when Snider’s hockey operations department is tossing around long-term deals like Frisbees. Just in August, the Flyers granted Scott Hartnell and Wayne Simmonds six-year deals. Both extensions ($4.75 million annual cap hit for Hartnell, $3.975 million for Simmonds) will start in 2013-14.

    In July, Philadelphia signed Shea Weber to a 14-year, $110 million offer sheet. Nashville matched Philadelphia’s offer. From a hockey operations perspective, all three transactions make sense. Hartnell is a rare commodity: a point-producing power forward (37-30—67, 136 penalty minutes last season) loathed by everyone except his teammates. Every coach wants a grinding, straight-line player like Simmonds (28-21—49, 114 PIMs), who fits the Flyers brand perfectly. Weber, one of the league’s three best D-men, would have replaced the concussed Chris Pronger, whose career is most likely over.

    It’s off the ice where Philadelphia’s moves are puzzling. As one of the board’s most influential members, Snider’s approval of long-term contracts and a financial straitjacket on a small-market Nashville club don’t exactly follow the company line."


    Don't know how long this link will stay up for free but here is the gist of some of Fluto's remarks just in case it switches to 99 cents to view...I like it when Fluto takes the reigns from KPD and does the "Sunday Hockey Notes", gives a different perspective.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: Fluto weighs in on Tyler Seguin extension and "Rich owner, poor example"

    Interesting reading, Sandog.  Thanks for posting it.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SanDogBrewin. Show SanDogBrewin's posts

    Re: Fluto weighs in on Tyler Seguin extension and "Rich owner, poor example"

    In Response to Re: Fluto weighs in on Tyler Seguin extension and "Rich owner, poor example":
    Interesting reading, Sandog.  Thanks for posting it.
    Posted by Not-A-Shot


    We can all use 99 cents in our pockets. What that buys these days I don't know Cool
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from stourque. Show stourque's posts

    Re: Fluto weighs in on Tyler Seguin extension and "Rich owner, poor example"

    Anther reason why I can't stand the Flyers. On and off the ice, they're a bunch of a-holes. It wasn't so much the fact they signed Shea Weber to an offer sheet, it was the terms - designed to screw the Predators, one of the poorer teams. Snider didn't mind taking their money to enter the league, and now wants to stick it to them. And this, while they are trying to negotiate a new deal with the players. Shame on him. Apparently the current system works just fine for many teams. I think the solution is to just remove the cap floor. Of course Bettman won't agree to this.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from islamorada. Show islamorada's posts

    Re: Fluto weighs in on Tyler Seguin extension and "Rich owner, poor example"

    Spot on Sandog, I repeat from what I read on here a month back from some poster, the owners are negiotiating with the owners.  The NHLPA is just "jam on the bread".  
     
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