Pressure is on Rask

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Kennedy97. Show Kennedy97's posts

    Re: Pressure is on Rask

    In response to NeelyOrrBourque's comment:

    Sorry, but I beg to differ on that.

    http://www.sportsnetworker.com/2011/09/19/professional-athletes-on-social-media-why-some-get-fans-and-others-fines/

     



    Where does the article address the impact fans allegedly have regarding adding pressure to players and their expectations?

    I have never met an athlete who was influenced by things that were posted online. It's not like fans were usually saying things that the athlete didn't know already. These guys know the stakes; it's not as if hearing it from anonymous message board posters or folks in the Twitterverse change anything. In my experience, most guys care about living up to the expectations of their teammates, organization, and their families--they just don't get hung up on the opinions of people they've never met (and who don't have a fingernail's worth of the talent that they have).

    Now, I've never worked with a professional athletes, but if guys in the the QMJHL understood the relative insignificance of fans and our opinions (I'm in the same boat--my opinion is as mentioned worthless to most pros, too) , I have to assume that most NHL guys are even better at the same.

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from NeelyOrrBourque. Show NeelyOrrBourque's posts

    Re: Pressure is on Rask

    In response to Kennedy97's comment:

    In response to NeelyOrrBourque's comment:

    Sorry, but I beg to differ on that.

    http://www.sportsnetworker.com/2011/09/19/professional-athletes-on-social-media-why-some-get-fans-and-others-fines/

     



    Where does the article address the impact fans allegedly have regarding adding pressure to players and their expectations?

    I have never met an athlete who was influenced by things that were posted online. It's not like fans were usually saying things that the athlete didn't know already. These guys know the stakes; it's not as if hearing it from anonymous message board posters or folks in the Twitterverse change anything. In my experience, most guys care about living up to the expectations of their teammates, organization, and their families--they just don't get hung up on the opinions of people they've never met (and who don't have a fingernail's worth of the talent that they have).

    Now, I've never worked with a professional athletes, but if guys in the the QMJHL understood the relative insignificance of fans and our opinions (I'm in the same boat--my opinion is as mentioned worthless to most pros, too) , I have to assume that most NHL guys are even better at the same.

     

     


    The 2nd paragraph of the article says it. Anyway, I'm not saying "we" in here have an impact Kennedy. I'm saying we help fuel the fire for the media to bring crap up. The players may or may not come into these forums, but members of the media do. They come in to see what's being said by the "common people" and if they see something that they think will help them get a reaction they'll use it. So, as a fan of the B's I try not to bring up negatives until "after" something actually happens. These players are professional's, that doesn't make them immune to human emotion. 

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from red75. Show red75's posts

    Re: Pressure is on Rask

    The only athletes I've heard say that social media has had an impact on their performance, point to the positive influence not the negative. In other words, they cling to the positive feedback and encouragement after a devastating loss or an injury. Melissa Hollingsworth is one example that comes to mind - if anyone hasn't seen her interview after missing the Olympic podium, it's heart wrenching. She has credited the positive social media reaction to that interview (in which she apologized to the entire nation of Canada) with helping her get her World Cup competition level back on track. Elite athletes seem more than capable of blanking out the negative for the most part. Nite's right about them having emotions like the rest of us, but out of simple self-preservation I think emotionally they tend to try to look at the words of encouragement and focus on that rather than any deridement.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from NeelyOrrBourque. Show NeelyOrrBourque's posts

    Re: Pressure is on Rask

    In response to red75's comment:

    The only athletes I've heard say that social media has had an impact on their performance, point to the positive influence not the negative. In other words, they cling to the positive feedback and encouragement after a devastating loss or an injury. Melissa Hollingsworth is one example that comes to mind - if anyone hasn't seen her interview after missing the Olympic podium, it's heart wrenching. She has credited the positive social media reaction to that interview (in which she apologized to the entire nation of Canada) with helping her get her World Cup competition level back on track. Elite athletes seem more than capable of blanking out the negative for the most part. Nite's right about them having emotions like the rest of us, but out of simple self-preservation I think emotionally they tend to try to look at the words of encouragement and focus on that rather than any deridement.



    I think more often then not they succeed, but some are better at it then others. I mean look at the look on Lundvist face after game 1. They brought up his 3-11 career OT record. He certainly hasn't let it bother him in his play all that much, but you can see how talking about it affects him. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from JohnTAlouette. Show JohnTAlouette's posts

    Re: Pressure is on Rask

    I thought the better team won in 2010. The B's have more talent than NY.

     
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