Would you advise Savard to retire?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    Make the right decision.  Get out before you can't walk out on your own.  If he cares as much about his family as he says, he'll hang 'em up.


     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Fletcher1. Show Fletcher1's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    In Response to Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?:
    In Response to Re: Would you advise Savard to retire? : Savard is only 33 and wont turn 34 until july
    Posted by screw-cindy-and-ovie


    SCO...good grief...a hypothetical for the sake of discussion...not all NHL players with concussions are 33 or 34 or whatever.  My question is would you make the same decision regarding concussions at 35 as you would at 45?  Focus on the point here...
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Stuke50. Show Stuke50's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    Savard will be back by the end of Feb. or before.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from olsonstephanie. Show olsonstephanie's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    He's done for this season.  I bet he'll try to come back next season.  And then we'll see...
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from number08. Show number08's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    I wouldn't tell him anything...if I was him I would come back one more time, better than quiting then trying to come back years later when the mind is willing and body is not. Like Cam on one hip and one knee.
     
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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from islamorada. Show islamorada's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    Serioulsy, if you have children and you wish to be a long term part of their life, well the better part of valor is to face the music.  Marc, you are 33.  Two concussions at that age is determental.  Your skills will not be like Lidsrom, they will diminish fast.  Move on to a comfortable life of giving to youth hockey.  A recovery is smart if you consider yourself not the hockey world in genreal.  Anything else is ego.  If I am wrong let it be with multiple opinions from the medical profession.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from SteveM. Show SteveM's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    From hockey, yes.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from CarolinaClamMan. Show CarolinaClamMan's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    In Response to Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?:
    The more I read about concussions (this article in this week's New Yorker is especially scary; it's mostly about football but points out that concussions are actually diagnosed more often in hockey:) http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/31/110131fa_fact_mcgrath   I would absolutely tell him to quit. Serious depression, early Alzheimer's...all common and frequent w/players in any sport who've suffered multiple concussions. I really REALLY think Savard is an exceptional player. I truly believe the Bruins have ZERO shot at the Cup w/out him (or a comparable replacement; good luck)....but for the sake of his health and his family, I would tell him to quit before he gets seriously hurt for the rest of his life.
    Posted by TryToBearIt

    There is also an article about concussions in sports in the current Time Mag-- the one with the Tiger Mom on the cover.

    And a few years ago the New Yorker had a good article about the danger of frequent small head hits-- those not severe enough for a concussion but just enough to slowly fatigue the membrane attaching the brain to the skull.  These hits can be as small as the playful helmet thumping teammates give one another in football.  Enough of them over time lead to mental deterioration (I forget the technical term for the illness)  

    Like many fans, I am glad to see the NHL trying to stop head hits and boarding.  I understand boarding to be checking from behind when the "victim" is three feet or more away from the boards.  Anyone know if this is the correct definition?

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from TuukkainNet. Show TuukkainNet's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    For me its about the kids and his guaranteed contract.  Hockey, as great as it is, is a just a part of Savard's life.  His children should come first.  I'm sure the B's would make room for him in some different capacity if he decided his days on the ice were done.

    Giving a sport you've played your entire life at any level is hard.  I can't imagine how difficult it would be when it feels like your body is still able or being a player at the most elite level.  I blew my left knee out 10 years ago and still miss sprinting down the basketball court and the feeling of my hands around the rim.  
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Mutant211. Show Mutant211's posts

    Re: Would you advise Savard to retire?

    Sadly, it appears that it would be in Savard's best interest to retire now and hope that he can still form complete sentences in 15 years. 

    For everyone who says that he will still get his $30M if he retires now, I wouldn't be so sure about that.  Has anyone you know ever been out on disability?  Insurance companies fight tooth and nail to keep the premiums that they collect.  They don't care about Savard's quality of life after he retires, only if he can still do the job that he is paid to do.  If he can still play professional hockey, they won't pay if he decides to retire for the sake of his future health.
     
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