(Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

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    (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending technique story


    In today's Globe, Fluto has this story about revolutionary technique:


     



    http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top" rel="nofollow">http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2014/08/23/notes-new-goalie-technique-providing-edge/gWwymMMoSoznaJN2IhPNYP/story.html?p1=Article_Trending_Top


     



    New goalie technique is providing an edge
    By Fluto Shinzawa


     



     In 2012, Jonathan Quick achieved a career goal. The former UMass Amherst standout went 16-4 in the postseason, including three shutouts, with a 1.41 goals-against average and a .946 save percentage to backstop the Kings to their first of two Stanley Cups in the last three seasons.


     



    In the bigger picture, the Conn Smythe-winning goalie helped to initiate a position-changing movement. The name of one of Quick’s go-to moves is “reverse VH,” also called post lean or shoulder lean. Not many North American goalies used it just three years ago. It’s since become a required technique in a goalie’s toolbox.


     



     “When I tried to teach this two years ago, guys looked at me like I had three heads,” said Brian Daccord, president and founder of Stop It Goaltending in Woburn. “It was something so out of this world. Now they’re all doing it.”


     



    There are significant progressions in goaltending’s timeline. Markers include Jacques Plante’s adoption of the mask and Francois Allaire’s teaching of the butterfly. In time, reverse VH may take its place among the position’s important advancements.


     



    “It’s a big one,” said Kevin Woodley, managing editor of In Goal Magazine, citing Quick, Sergei Bobrovsky, Kari Lehtonen, Jonathan Bernier, Frederik Andersen, Viktor Fasth, and Marc-Andre Fleury as goalies who have incorporated reverse VH well. “It’s a pretty big step.”


     



    Goalies are familiar with standard VH to guard against sharp-angle hazards. When the puck is in the corner, a goalie seals the strong side by planting his lead pad vertically (V) against the post. He positions the trail pad horizontally (H) along the goal line.


     


    VH, however, locks a goalie into position. He can make a good first blocking save. But it’s not easy to push off the lead edge into the next save. A shot aimed off the trail pad creates backdoor and net-front garbage. The goalie’s torso is square to the shooter in the corner, which then calls for more movement to go into the follow-up save. In today’s game, a hectic goalie leaves more holes than a quieter counterpart.


     



    “Look at how goalies get scored on. A lot of times, it’s in transition,” Daccord said. “A goalie in transition is going down from an up position. If you eliminate that, if a goalie’s down to begin with, you don’t get beat in transition anymore.”


     



    Reverse VH calls for the lead pad to be down. The goalie either holds his skate against or locks his toe into the strong-side post. The lead shoulder leans into the post. The placement of the lead pad and shoulder creates a tight strong-side seal. The shooter sees no openings. The lead pad, because it’s down, also cuts down the shooting lane toward the trail pad. This reduces the danger of far-pad shots that produce rebounds.


     



    The trail pad is off the ice, usually at a 45-degree angle. The trail edge reinforces the strong-side seal. It also gives the goalie more power to flow into the next save. In standard VH, the trail edge is off the ice and disengaged. In reverse VH, the trail edge is biting into the ice, ready for the goalie to activate when necessary.


     



    The options that follow off the first save are what make reverse VH a game-changer.


     



    “It’s leveraged to push the body into the post on the seal,” Woodley said of the trail edge. “Then when you come off the post and push across, you use the back edge to build momentum. You’re pushing with your lead edge off the post. With the back edge, you do a reverse C-cut to build more momentum. You’re more dynamic now.”


     



    Every NHL goalie makes the first save. The excellent ones — Daccord considers Quick, Carey Price, and Henrik Lundqvist the best — transition smoothly into the second and third stops. Reverse VH is a good launch pad for what might come next. If the shooter tries a wraparound, the goalie engages his edges to glide off the post. If the puck enters the net-front real estate, the goalie’s already square to any threats instead of having to rotate his torso. If the puck goes out to the point, he’s ready for what might come next.


     



    The critical benefit is efficiency. Not long ago, goalie coaches taught their charges to explode from Point A to Point B. The goal was speed.


     



    But powerful movement leaves holes. Techniques like reverse VH allow a goalie to flow. In this area, Daccord considers Price a prodigy.


     



    “He never explodes. He drifts and glides,” Daccord said. “He maintains very quiet, calm, efficient body language. There’s less movement of the head, less movement of the eyes. His eyes are able to track visually and attach to the puck better than being spot to spot and static.


     



    “The game is much smoother for goalies now. There’s no more firing off the post. It’s a glide off the post. You’re coming out calmly and smoothly, not statically at all.”


     



    The genesis of reverse VH is unknown. Woodley believes coaches in Sweden first tinkered with it approximately five years ago.


     


    There are more goaltending coaches in Sweden and Finland than in the United States and Canada. They practice an open-source culture where they share ideas and practice trickle-down teaching to youth levels.


     



    What probably started with an experiment evolved into an innovation. Now it’s a necessity.


     



    “It’s just nuts,” Daccord said of the speed of goaltending’s progress. “Goalies are getting better. It’s why you need goalie coaching. You can’t learn this stuff on your own.”


     



    ------------------------------------


     



    OK, I coached goalies for years, at Joe Bertagna's camp, at colleges, youth and other organizations.  I finally hung it up after the flopper mode took over and goalies spent the game on their knees.  Its effective enough, but too foreign for a 70s guy like me.


     


    But I still like to think analytically about it, and Im not understanding this description.  How does a goalie:  " put lead pad down. The goalie either holds his skate against or locks his toe into the strong-side post. The lead shoulder leans into the post. The placement of the lead pad and shoulder creates a tight strong-side seal"


     



    If the pad is down, how does he make a "seal" using his strong side shoulder?  It seems like there's gaps there.  The toe is locked against the post, so where is the pad when its "down?"


     



    This reverse VH thing baffles me.  Help me out, goalies that played after 1985.







     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from islamorada. Show islamorada's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    The Atlantic: The Oracle of Ice Hockey


    This was more informative on the evolution of the goalie. I posted several months ago with little or no response. Good luck with you thread, Canadians a rule hockey but sometimes they are Canadian centric.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from NeelyOrrBourque. Show NeelyOrrBourque's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    In response to SoxFanInIL's comment:
    [QUOTE


     



    OK, I coached goalies for years, at Joe Bertagna's camp, at colleges, youth and other organizations.  I finally hung it up after the flopper mode took over and goalies spent the game on their knees.  Its effective enough, but too foreign for a 70s guy like me.


     


    But I still like to think analytically about it, and Im not understanding this description.  How does a goalie:  " put lead pad down. The goalie either holds his skate against or locks his toe into the strong-side post. The lead shoulder leans into the post. The placement of the lead pad and shoulder creates a tight strong-side seal"


     



    If the pad is down, how does he make a "seal" using his strong side shoulder?  It seems like there's gaps there.  The toe is locked against the post, so where is the pad when its "down?"


    This reverse VH thing baffles me.  Help me out, goalies that played after 1985.


     [/QUOTE]



    Sorry you're having trouble understanding sox. Maybe Jim Bedard can help you.


    Anyway, the "seal from his strong side shoulder" is done by leaning toward the post. Your arm becomes parallel with the post, trapper is facing outward. There's literally no gaps whatsoever. Your pad is flat along the ice & other is down blocking the middle of the net. The pressure you have against the post leaves you plenty to push off with to center yourself if the puck is passed across, but if you leave your stick blade facing the shooter you have a good chance of blocking that as well.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from SoxFanInIL. Show SoxFanInIL's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    In response to NeelyOrrBourque's comment:



    Sorry you're having trouble understanding sox. Maybe Jim Bedard can help you.


     


    Anyway, the "seal from his strong side shoulder" is done by leaning toward the post. Your arm becomes parallel with the post, trapper is facing outward. There's literally no gaps whatsoever. Your pad is flat along the ice & other is down blocking the middle of the net. The pressure you have against the post leaves you plenty to push off with to center yourself if the puck is passed across, but if you leave your stick blade facing the shooter you have a good chance of blocking that as well.





    I dont understand the Bedard thing (I dont understand a lot these days) Is he in Illinois now?



    Anywho, it sounded like the skate was up against the post. Im imagining leaning towards the post with the shoulder ...but the pad is flat on the ice. Lets say the blocker is on the RH, puck is in the right corner... if the arm is up against the post blocker out, it seems like the right leg would be impossibly pushed towards the center of the goal if the right skate is up against the post. 

    I need a picture.



     


     


     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    “It’s leveraged to push the body into the post on the seal,” Woodley said of the trail edge. “Then when you come off the post and push across, you use the back edge to build momentum. You’re pushing with your lead edge off the post. With the back edge, you do a reverse C-cut to build more momentum. You’re more dynamic now.”

    So what you're saying is he is on one post and then he moves to the other.

    Is this from The Onion?

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from NeelyOrrBourque. Show NeelyOrrBourque's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    In response to SoxFanInIL's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to NeelyOrrBourque's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     


    Sorry you're having trouble understanding sox. Maybe Jim Bedard can help you.

     

     

     

    Anyway, the "seal from his strong side shoulder" is done by leaning toward the post. Your arm becomes parallel with the post, trapper is facing outward. There's literally no gaps whatsoever. Your pad is flat along the ice & other is down blocking the middle of the net. The pressure you have against the post leaves you plenty to push off with to center yourself if the puck is passed across, but if you leave your stick blade facing the shooter you have a good chance of blocking that as well.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I dont understand the Bedard thing (I dont understand a lot these days) Is he in Illinois now?

     

     


    Anywho, it sounded like the skate was up against the post. Im imagining leaning towards the post with the shoulder ...but the pad is flat on the ice. Lets say the blocker is on the RH, puck is in the right corner... if the arm is up against the post blocker out, it seems like the right leg would be impossibly pushed towards the center of the goal if the right skate is up against the post. 

    I need a picture.


     

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    1. He's the goalie coach for the Red Wings

    2. Go onto youtube & type in "Reverse VH" that will help you.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kelvana33. Show kelvana33's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    For goalies today it's almost a minor tweak to what they are already being taught. For old schoolers it's almost a foreign language. Basically, it's cover as much as you can against the post like they've been taught but also gives them the ability to maneuver afterwards.




     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from WalkTheLine. Show WalkTheLine's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    In response to Not-A-Shot's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    “It’s leveraged to push the body into the post on the seal,” Woodley said of the trail edge. “Then when you come off the post and push across, you use the back edge to build momentum. You’re pushing with your lead edge off the post. With the back edge, you do a reverse C-cut to build more momentum. You’re more dynamic now.”

    So what you're saying is he is on one post and then he moves to the other.

    Is this from The Onion?

    [/QUOTE]

    No it's real. They just keep getting weirder and weirder, don't they? :P

    But here's what The Onion Book of Known Knowledge might have (or not) said about goalies.

    Ice Hockey Goalie: An offensive position in the game of Ice Hockey (see, Canada, form of religion) often manned by a cowardly player who in great fear of injury dons a ridiculous, clown-like amount of padded protection and the silliest mask possible which is a calculated mechanism to take the aggression away from opponents by making them laugh hysterically. Rather than skate to the  end of the ice where, were he to do his job (score goals) he believes he would be hit, punched, knifed, shot or called bad names in French, he cringes in a crouch near the only thing he could hide behind if things got out of hand. Often in such a state of paralyzing fear he rarely leaves the ice despite the fact that all of his linemates frequently “change up”.  Will occasionally sprint for the safety of the bench in fear when there is a scary penalty on the ice.

    [object HTMLDivElement]

     
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    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    In response to WalkTheLine's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Not-A-Shot's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    “It’s leveraged to push the body into the post on the seal,” Woodley said of the trail edge. “Then when you come off the post and push across, you use the back edge to build momentum. You’re pushing with your lead edge off the post. With the back edge, you do a reverse C-cut to build more momentum. You’re more dynamic now.”

    So what you're saying is he is on one post and then he moves to the other.

    Is this from The Onion?

    [/QUOTE]

    No it's real. They just keep getting weirder and weirder, don't they? :P

    But here's what The Onion Book of Known Knowledge might have (or not) said about goalies.

    Ice Hockey Goalie: An offensive position in the game of Ice Hockey (see, Canada, form of religion) often manned by a cowardly player who in great fear of injury dons a ridiculous, clown-like amount of padded protection and the silliest mask possible which is a calculated mechanism to take the aggression away from opponents by making them laugh hysterically. Rather than skate to the  end of the ice where, were he to do his job (score goals) he believes he would be hit, punched, knifed, shot or called bad names in French, he cringes in a crouch near the only thing he could hide behind if things got out of hand. Often in such a state of paralyzing fear he rarely leaves the ice despite the fact that all of his linemates frequently “change up”.  Will occasionally sprint for the safety of the bench in fear when there is a scary penalty on the ice.

    [object HTMLDivElement]

    [/QUOT

    Ha,ha,ha! I like this!

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from NeelyOrrBourque. Show NeelyOrrBourque's posts

    Re: (Younger) Goalies, help me out on Fluto's goaltending tequnique story

    In response to kelvana33's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    For goalies today it's almost a minor tweak to what they are already being taught. For old schoolers it's almost a foreign language. Basically, it's cover as much as you can against the post like they've been taught but also gives them the ability to maneuver afterwards.




    [/QUOTE]

    It's not foreign if you teach a hybrid style kel. What's really sad is that now it doesn't matter how athletic, how flexible, how great his agility is. If you see a goalie's Dad & Mom under 6 ft 2". You know there's little hope after Bantam in playing anything competitive. And it's a shame, because in my experience in coaching it's the smaller guys who's so eager to learn. They listen better, they take constructive criticism better. I think the bigger goalie's know now that as long as they have that height advantage; they know they have that advantage and it makes them have a non-chalant attitude.

     
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