Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from wicksandrowe. Show wicksandrowe's posts

    Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

    It may be that I grossly overvalue the art of passing the ball in basketball, but seeing Bradley, Bass, Green try to move the ball around the court to me is tantamount to sticking needles in my eyes.

    None of them, it seems, knows or sees what should happen one or two passes later. They seem totally oblivious to anything that should happen next. It's as if the pass that they make next has to be the assist pass.

    And that brings up the whole 'hockey assist' thing. You can't make one if you can't see a step ahead on the court. So that wipes out Bradley, Bass, and Green, core scorers on this assembly, as ball movers. One, they don't see the next pass, and, two, they can't make the assist pass.

    But added to that is the fact that if you're a player that can actually see the next pass to be made, and I mean Pressey, Sullinger, Olynyk, Rondo, would you trust Bradley, Bass, and Green to make it? 

    No. And that results in a real lot of pounding the ball and waiting for.... the assist pass. Even if you made it a league stat, Rondo still wouldn't give it up to those three. He passes to them, it's for the assist. And J. Crawford was the same way.

    You don't see that in Houston, Golden State, Portland where they have players with better rounded skill sets.

    And that's a really indirect way of saying that the team needs a few more guys like Chris Johnson.

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCSP. Show BCSP's posts

    Re: Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

    In response to wicksandrowe's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    It may be that I grossly overvalue the art of passing the ball in basketball, but seeing Bradley, Bass, Green try to move the ball around the court to me is tantamount to sticking needles in my eyes.

    None of them, it seems, knows or sees what should happen one or two passes later. They seem totally oblivious to anything that should happen next. It's as if the pass that they make next has to be the assist pass.

    And that brings up the whole 'hockey assist' thing. You can't make one if you can't see a step ahead on the court. So that wipes out Bradley, Bass, and Green, core scorers on this assembly, as ball movers. One, they don't see the next pass, and, two, they can't make the assist pass.

    But added to that is the fact that if you're a player that can actually see the next pass to be made, and I mean Pressey, Sullinger, Olynyk, Rondo, would you trust Bradley, Bass, and Green to make it? 

    No. And that results in a real lot of pounding the ball and waiting for.... the assist pass. Even if you made it a league stat, Rondo still wouldn't give it up to those three. He passes to them, it's for the assist. And J. Crawford was the same way.

    You don't see that in Houston, Golden State, Portland where they have players with better rounded skill sets.

    And that's a really indirect way of saying that the team needs a few more guys like Chris Johnson.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    + 1 I am buying it - CJ appears to have what is known as a feel for the game! Only time will tell if his skill sets and physical abilities make him a keeper! 

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from chris33. Show chris33's posts

    Re: Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

    The Celtics pass the ball too much. Even Tommy talked about it last night. They turn down open chots at the head of the key all the time.

    You have 17 seconds to take a chot once the ball gets over mid court. Choot the ball if you are open. It's not rocket science.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from debrit. Show debrit's posts

    Re: Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

    In response to chris33's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The Celtics pass the ball too much. Even Tommy talked about it last night. They turn down open chots at the head of the key all the time.

    You have 17 seconds to take a chot once the ball gets over mid court. Choot the ball if you are open. It's not rocket science.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes,they pass too much.The reason is they are not good chooters.We need 2 good perimeters chooters.

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ANONMD08. Show ANONMD08's posts

    Re: Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

    In response to debrit's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to chris33's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The Celtics pass the ball too much. Even Tommy talked about it last night. They turn down open chots at the head of the key all the time.

    You have 17 seconds to take a chot once the ball gets over mid court. Choot the ball if you are open. It's not rocket science.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes,they pass too much.The reason is they are not good chooters.We need 2 good perimeters chooters.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I totally agree. Was another disappearing act by Jeff Green.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from wicksandrowe. Show wicksandrowe's posts

    Re: Chris Johnson and the hockey assist

    In response to chris33's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The Celtics pass the ball too much. Even Tommy talked about it last night. They turn down open chots at the head of the key all the time.

    You have 17 seconds to take a chot once the ball gets over mid court. Choot the ball if you are open. It's not rocket science.

    [/QUOTE]

    Passing the ball a lot and passing it for effect are 2 entirely different things. Making dead passes is what Bradley, Green, and Bass do. They catch, they look, they eventually fire away, but when they pass, they create nothing and it's back to square one, only 5-6 seconds deeper into the clock.

    The ball gets to different places on the court quickest by moving in the air. This is understood. It drives Tommy Heinsohn's entire philosophy - run and the ball will find you. Nobody dribbles faster than a passed ball.

    In the half-court, effective defenses will get a stalemate on the first side of the ball, very good defenses can maintain that on the second side, but if the ball gets to a third side, even great defenses get defeated. Any coach knows this.

    Getting the ball changed from side to side depends on passing, not dribbling. And if it is by the dribble then there'd beter be a coldly precise system of screens and cuts going on to spring the guy who gets the pass from the designated dribbler.

    That pretty much describes the Rondo, KG, Pierce, Allen offensive system. To try and replicate that system with the players on this team now would be folly. Something else is called for.

    Players who can catch, pass, and move, and all without having to spit out their chewing gum.

     

     
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