Doc Has "Personnel Say"

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    Re: Doc Has

    I say be careful what you wish for. If doc wanted Perk over JG and a 1st,then I expect the Clippers to make the moves they've been known for under his helm. Now that we know that doc is also taking over DAs duties I believe he won't be on the Clips bench for all 3 years either maybe he just wanted to be more tahn a HC. In that case I refer to my opening statement.

     
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    Re: Doc Has


    Here's an article that I found. Sums it up pretty good about Doc's coaching.

    After taking a while to think about it, I've had to agree with Mike Sullivan that Doc has been under achieving over the past few years yet his over paid, under performing actions have been allowed to slide without being proper sanctions applied.

    Rivers can't take all the credit for Boston's struggles, as Ainge and injuries have pitched in to help wreak havoc. Doc himself hasn't done well in hiding the numerous flaws in his coaching abilities and I'll highlight a few here so you can create your own opinion after reading.

    As the man in charge, it's up to him to know and do what's best for the team. This includes but not limited to making the right tough decisions. It also includes self analysis to know when you need to break out of your own way and adapt a new. For that I also blame the rest of the coaching staff. Rivers has been stubborn at times with his rotations. The myth about Doc not playing rookies was evident when though Jared Sullinger's performance out shone Bass' on a nightly, Bass continually got the nod ahead of him. Fab Melo is a raw rookie, but in a case where your team is very undersized he would have and could have learnt more playing along side Garnett throughout the 80+ game season because Jason Collins obviously wasn't a great choice with hardly any rebounds and basically no points.

    Doc has also done something every playoff that puzzles me. He uses his roster and makes it to the to the playoffs, but while in there he sidelines key role players. The same role players that helped to seal wins over the season. This has always wore out our key, over played players.

    It seems his hard head also makes him not realise talent and he has shown problems in developing players talent as well. Terrence Williams was an answer to the point guard (point forward in Terrence's case) dilemma and everyone knew that, but somehow Doc and his staff didn't. He even failed to make the best when he Jermaine O'Neal and others working for him. Al Jefferson shone after he left Boston for Seattle and then Jazz. And the Maine Red Claws D-League coach found a way to get production out of Fab Melo. Randolph struggled offensively yet he shone in the Chinese League. Suffice to say, Rivers has a problem utilizing players talent and for a top-tier coach like Popovich and Thibodeau that shouldn't be so.

    This year Lee and Terry struggled to play the way he wanted them to which they had problems doing and yet no change to his game plan to incorporate them better. It was not until late in the playoffs that Terry played in his own old rhythm and that's when we finally saw him hitting big shots. Better late than never on Terry's part I guess, but 60 games into the regular season wouldn't have been a bad time either.

    His mentality of sacrificing rebounds for defense has kicked us in the rear and has been our downfall, yet he has stuck with the decision of continuing to run those plays as if a highly intelligent man such as himself doesn't know that it all add us in the end. He needs to change his defensive approach and create a new dynamic one.

    In a case where his former assistant coach strides has surpassed those of the teacher in his own game, Doc Rivers needs to either change or leave. We on the other hand, need to know when it's time to let go and say good bye.

     
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    Re: Doc Has

    In response to BirdLewsBias' comment:


    Here's an article that I found. Sums it up pretty good about Doc's coaching.

    After taking a while to think about it, I've had to agree with Mike Sullivan that Doc has been under achieving over the past few years yet his over paid, under performing actions have been allowed to slide without being proper sanctions applied.

    Rivers can't take all the credit for Boston's struggles, as Ainge and injuries have pitched in to help wreak havoc. Doc himself hasn't done well in hiding the numerous flaws in his coaching abilities and I'll highlight a few here so you can create your own opinion after reading.

    As the man in charge, it's up to him to know and do what's best for the team. This includes but not limited to making the right tough decisions. It also includes self analysis to know when you need to break out of your own way and adapt a new. For that I also blame the rest of the coaching staff. Rivers has been stubborn at times with his rotations. The myth about Doc not playing rookies was evident when though Jared Sullinger's performance out shone Bass' on a nightly, Bass continually got the nod ahead of him. Fab Melo is a raw rookie, but in a case where your team is very undersized he would have and could have learnt more playing along side Garnett throughout the 80+ game season because Jason Collins obviously wasn't a great choice with hardly any rebounds and basically no points.

    Doc has also done something every playoff that puzzles me. He uses his roster and makes it to the to the playoffs, but while in there he sidelines key role players. The same role players that helped to seal wins over the season. This has always wore out our key, over played players.

    It seems his hard head also makes him not realise talent and he has shown problems in developing players talent as well. Terrence Williams was an answer to the point guard (point forward in Terrence's case) dilemma and everyone knew that, but somehow Doc and his staff didn't. He even failed to make the best when he Jermaine O'Neal and others working for him. Al Jefferson shone after he left Boston for Seattle and then Jazz. And the Maine Red Claws D-League coach found a way to get production out of Fab Melo. Randolph struggled offensively yet he shone in the Chinese League. Suffice to say, Rivers has a problem utilizing players talent and for a top-tier coach like Popovich and Thibodeau that shouldn't be so.

    This year Lee and Terry struggled to play the way he wanted them to which they had problems doing and yet no change to his game plan to incorporate them better. It was not until late in the playoffs that Terry played in his own old rhythm and that's when we finally saw him hitting big shots. Better late than never on Terry's part I guess, but 60 games into the regular season wouldn't have been a bad time either.

    His mentality of sacrificing rebounds for defense has kicked us in the rear and has been our downfall, yet he has stuck with the decision of continuing to run those plays as if a highly intelligent man such as himself doesn't know that it all add us in the end. He needs to change his defensive approach and create a new dynamic one.

    In a case where his former assistant coach strides has surpassed those of the teacher in his own game, Doc Rivers needs to either change or leave. We on the other hand, need to know when it's time to let go and say good bye.



    +1,000

    They say love is blind and I guess those in a love affair with Doc will never see the light.. but Im pretty sure the Clippers will in time

     

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