Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

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    Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    COMMENTARY Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ... But it's a fun comparison to consider as the Mavs make their lone visit to Boston Updated: February 9, 2014, 2:51 AM ET By Chris Forsberg | ESPNBoston.com

     

    WALTHAM, Mass. -- Let's play everyone's favorite game: Whose Stat Line is it Anyway?

    Player A: 8.2 pts, 3.4 reb, 20.4 mpg, 40.5 FG%, 20.6 3PT%, 12.8 PER

    Player B: 6.5 pts, 4.3 reb, 18.1 mpg, 42.3 FG%, 30.8 3PT%, 12.3 PER

    Hint: Both are rookie stat lines, 15 years apart. You have 30 seconds, good luck.

    [Jeopardy theme music]

    Player A is Dirk Nowitzki's rookie line in 47 games for the Dallas Mavericks during the 1998-99 campaign. Player B is Kelly Olynyk's stat line through 41 games this season for the Boston Celtics.

     

    Kelly Olynyk

     

    Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports Kelly Olynyk flashes great potential but must develop his game to earn more playing time.

     

    Now, let's be explicitly clear here: We are NOT suggesting that Olynyk is going to be an 11-time All-Star or league and Finals MVP who spends his entire career in one jersey. But consider this exercise a friendly reminder that it takes a little time for every rookie to find his place in the NBA.

    The jumping off point for this exercise is that Nowitzki and the Mavericks make their lone visit to TD Garden on Sunday to meet the streaking Celtics. It's the first time that Olynyk gets to share the NBA floor with one of his NBA idols.

    Yes, the flowing hair, the No. 41 jersey, the sweet-shooting stroke, Olynyk hasn't exactly run from that which inevitably leaves observers making the Nowitzki comparison. Olynyk is bashful when that chatter arises, saying he's humbled to even be mentioned in the same breath as a player with as decorated a career as Nowitzki.

    Comparisons to the man Gerald Wallace calls the "German Assassin" aside, a breakout performance at the Orlando summer league set first-year expectations for Olynyk unfairly high. The impatient types worry the Canadian 7-footer won't reach his potential, despite simply enduring the typical ups and downs of the NBA rookie.

    There have been glimpses of his potential along his first-year odyssey -- 25 points on 11-of-17 shooting against the Lakers last month, or 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting versus the Hawks on New Year's Eve -- but his playing time and production have been inconsistent. Even still, you can see progress in his game.

    While he's still a bit too hesitant with his shot, Olynyk has thrived recently by putting a focus on everything but his own offense. At times we've seen a more aggressive rebounder, a more competitive defender and a player content to facilitate offense with excellent passing skills.

    During Friday's win over the Sacramento Kings, Olynyk finished with 11 points on 3-of-5 shooting with nine rebounds, five assists and a steal. Multiple times he used his height to outleap DeMarcus Cousins and keep an offensive rebound alive by tipping it back out to a teammate.

    With the qualifier that he's been limited to 15.3 minutes per game during Boston's recent three-game winning streak, it's hard to ignore how Olynyk owns a plus-17 net rating during his floor time (113.3 offensive rating; 96.3 defensive rating). He's also tops among Boston's regulars with a 13.2 percent offensive rebound rate in that span, and his assist rate is as glossy as some of the point guards.

    That's an encouraging sign, even in a small sample. For the season, Olynyk's defensive rating of 104.9 is second worst on the team (only Gerald Wallace currently owns a worse number among regulars). 

    Olynyk struggled with his shot early in the season and his advanced individual numbers are a bit of an eyesore (according to Synergy, he ranks in the 25th percentile averaging 0.812 points per play). No one is really sweating those numbers because his offense will almost certainly come in time.

    The key is getting Olynyk to understand Boston's defensive philosophies and thrive in the help system. What's more, he's also trying to get his body into NBA shape. Olynyk must navigate the tricky balance between bulking up without compromising the speed and athleticism that make him a 7-foot weapon on the offensive end.

    Regardless of how Boston's season plays out from here, the next three months are important for the development of young players like Olynyk. If the Celtics make any moves at the trade deadline, it could open up more consistent playing time.

    But coach Brad Stevens said he prefers that his players earn their time, and Olynyk must show that he's making progress and worthy of an extended opportunity, particularly now when Boston is logjammed at the frontcourt spots.

    After Olynyk was picked for the league's Rising Stars Challenge at All-Star Weekend, Stevens noted, "I think Kelly is just going through your typical rookie swings of good games, not-so-good games. That's part of being a rookie. And it's part of inconsistent minutes, too; it's hard to play inconsistent minutes."

    Not to put unfair expectations on Olynyk, but you look at someone like Jared Sullinger -- who is blossoming into a double-double machine in his second season in the league -- and wonder if Olynyk could see similar development, particularly on a team in transition. While the Celtics have stressed that they view Olynyk as a complementary player, he has an offensive skill set that Boston needs off its bench.

    Forget the comparisons to guys like Nowitzki; that kind of thing will take care of itself in time. Olynyk needs to immerse himself in getting better on the defensive end. Doing so could open doors to consistent playing time, which he needs to develop his game at this level.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCSP. Show BCSP's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    Well written article -AND- a great reminder for fans, to be patient with young talent! 

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from DrBoogiebone. Show DrBoogiebone's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    COMMENTARY Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ... But it's a fun comparison to consider as the Mavs make their lone visit to Boston Updated: February 9, 2014, 2:51 AM ET By Chris Forsberg | ESPNBoston.com

     

    WALTHAM, Mass. -- Let's play everyone's favorite game: Whose Stat Line is it Anyway?

    Player A: 8.2 pts, 3.4 reb, 20.4 mpg, 40.5 FG%, 20.6 3PT%, 12.8 PER

    Player B: 6.5 pts, 4.3 reb, 18.1 mpg, 42.3 FG%, 30.8 3PT%, 12.3 PER

    Hint: Both are rookie stat lines, 15 years apart. You have 30 seconds, good luck.

    [Jeopardy theme music]

    Player A is Dirk Nowitzki's rookie line in 47 games for the Dallas Mavericks during the 1998-99 campaign. Player B is Kelly Olynyk's stat line through 41 games this season for the Boston Celtics.

     

    Kelly Olynyk

     

    Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports Kelly Olynyk flashes great potential but must develop his game to earn more playing time.

     

    Now, let's be explicitly clear here: We are NOT suggesting that Olynyk is going to be an 11-time All-Star or league and Finals MVP who spends his entire career in one jersey. But consider this exercise a friendly reminder that it takes a little time for every rookie to find his place in the NBA.

    The jumping off point for this exercise is that Nowitzki and the Mavericks make their lone visit to TD Garden on Sunday to meet the streaking Celtics. It's the first time that Olynyk gets to share the NBA floor with one of his NBA idols.

    Yes, the flowing hair, the No. 41 jersey, the sweet-shooting stroke, Olynyk hasn't exactly run from that which inevitably leaves observers making the Nowitzki comparison. Olynyk is bashful when that chatter arises, saying he's humbled to even be mentioned in the same breath as a player with as decorated a career as Nowitzki.

    Comparisons to the man Gerald Wallace calls the "German Assassin" aside, a breakout performance at the Orlando summer league set first-year expectations for Olynyk unfairly high. The impatient types worry the Canadian 7-footer won't reach his potential, despite simply enduring the typical ups and downs of the NBA rookie.

    There have been glimpses of his potential along his first-year odyssey -- 25 points on 11-of-17 shooting against the Lakers last month, or 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting versus the Hawks on New Year's Eve -- but his playing time and production have been inconsistent. Even still, you can see progress in his game.

    While he's still a bit too hesitant with his shot, Olynyk has thrived recently by putting a focus on everything but his own offense. At times we've seen a more aggressive rebounder, a more competitive defender and a player content to facilitate offense with excellent passing skills.

    During Friday's win over the Sacramento Kings, Olynyk finished with 11 points on 3-of-5 shooting with nine rebounds, five assists and a steal. Multiple times he used his height to outleap DeMarcus Cousins and keep an offensive rebound alive by tipping it back out to a teammate.

    With the qualifier that he's been limited to 15.3 minutes per game during Boston's recent three-game winning streak, it's hard to ignore how Olynyk owns a plus-17 net rating during his floor time (113.3 offensive rating; 96.3 defensive rating). He's also tops among Boston's regulars with a 13.2 percent offensive rebound rate in that span, and his assist rate is as glossy as some of the point guards.

    That's an encouraging sign, even in a small sample. For the season, Olynyk's defensive rating of 104.9 is second worst on the team (only Gerald Wallace currently owns a worse number among regulars). 

    Olynyk struggled with his shot early in the season and his advanced individual numbers are a bit of an eyesore (according to Synergy, he ranks in the 25th percentile averaging 0.812 points per play). No one is really sweating those numbers because his offense will almost certainly come in time.

    The key is getting Olynyk to understand Boston's defensive philosophies and thrive in the help system. What's more, he's also trying to get his body into NBA shape. Olynyk must navigate the tricky balance between bulking up without compromising the speed and athleticism that make him a 7-foot weapon on the offensive end.

    Regardless of how Boston's season plays out from here, the next three months are important for the development of young players like Olynyk. If the Celtics make any moves at the trade deadline, it could open up more consistent playing time.

    But coach Brad Stevens said he prefers that his players earn their time, and Olynyk must show that he's making progress and worthy of an extended opportunity, particularly now when Boston is logjammed at the frontcourt spots.

    After Olynyk was picked for the league's Rising Stars Challenge at All-Star Weekend, Stevens noted, "I think Kelly is just going through your typical rookie swings of good games, not-so-good games. That's part of being a rookie. And it's part of inconsistent minutes, too; it's hard to play inconsistent minutes."

    Not to put unfair expectations on Olynyk, but you look at someone like Jared Sullinger -- who is blossoming into a double-double machine in his second season in the league -- and wonder if Olynyk could see similar development, particularly on a team in transition. While the Celtics have stressed that they view Olynyk as a complementary player, he has an offensive skill set that Boston needs off its bench.

    Forget the comparisons to guys like Nowitzki; that kind of thing will take care of itself in time. Olynyk needs to immerse himself in getting better on the defensive end. Doing so could open doors to consistent playing time, which he needs to develop his game at this level.

    [/QUOTE]

    Good post. You know, I wanted nothing to do with Kelly up to last years draft. Of course, I wasn't looking at him as a stretch 4 either. I saw a 7 footer with no wing span, who had a good offensive game, but was slow and sucked at defending. Not much has surprised me other then his passing/court vision. Needless to say, summer league made me feel alot better about the pick, as well as understanding how Danny was envisioning Kelly's roll. I just wish he would be more aggressive out there with his shooting/offense. I'm a little shocked in fact, that Danny or Brad hasn't gotten on him more about it. The kid can shoot. Give him the green light.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from 37stories. Show 37stories's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    He isn't going to be Nowitski but he does have a lot of skills. Look at Brad Miller. Miller shot well from the outside and could pass, but he couldn't put it on the floor like Oly. Miller played for years and made 2 all star teams.

    No one can tell me that Oly can't be better than Miller.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCSP. Show BCSP's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to DrBoogiebone's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    COMMENTARY Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ... But it's a fun comparison to consider as the Mavs make their lone visit to Boston Updated: February 9, 2014, 2:51 AM ET By Chris Forsberg | ESPNBoston.com

     

    WALTHAM, Mass. -- Let's play everyone's favorite game: Whose Stat Line is it Anyway?

    Player A: 8.2 pts, 3.4 reb, 20.4 mpg, 40.5 FG%, 20.6 3PT%, 12.8 PER

    Player B: 6.5 pts, 4.3 reb, 18.1 mpg, 42.3 FG%, 30.8 3PT%, 12.3 PER

    Hint: Both are rookie stat lines, 15 years apart. You have 30 seconds, good luck.

    [Jeopardy theme music]

    Player A is Dirk Nowitzki's rookie line in 47 games for the Dallas Mavericks during the 1998-99 campaign. Player B is Kelly Olynyk's stat line through 41 games this season for the Boston Celtics.

     

    Kelly Olynyk

     

    Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports Kelly Olynyk flashes great potential but must develop his game to earn more playing time.

     

    Now, let's be explicitly clear here: We are NOT suggesting that Olynyk is going to be an 11-time All-Star or league and Finals MVP who spends his entire career in one jersey. But consider this exercise a friendly reminder that it takes a little time for every rookie to find his place in the NBA.

    The jumping off point for this exercise is that Nowitzki and the Mavericks make their lone visit to TD Garden on Sunday to meet the streaking Celtics. It's the first time that Olynyk gets to share the NBA floor with one of his NBA idols.

    Yes, the flowing hair, the No. 41 jersey, the sweet-shooting stroke, Olynyk hasn't exactly run from that which inevitably leaves observers making the Nowitzki comparison. Olynyk is bashful when that chatter arises, saying he's humbled to even be mentioned in the same breath as a player with as decorated a career as Nowitzki.

    Comparisons to the man Gerald Wallace calls the "German Assassin" aside, a breakout performance at the Orlando summer league set first-year expectations for Olynyk unfairly high. The impatient types worry the Canadian 7-footer won't reach his potential, despite simply enduring the typical ups and downs of the NBA rookie.

    There have been glimpses of his potential along his first-year odyssey -- 25 points on 11-of-17 shooting against the Lakers last month, or 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting versus the Hawks on New Year's Eve -- but his playing time and production have been inconsistent. Even still, you can see progress in his game.

    While he's still a bit too hesitant with his shot, Olynyk has thrived recently by putting a focus on everything but his own offense. At times we've seen a more aggressive rebounder, a more competitive defender and a player content to facilitate offense with excellent passing skills.

    During Friday's win over the Sacramento Kings, Olynyk finished with 11 points on 3-of-5 shooting with nine rebounds, five assists and a steal. Multiple times he used his height to outleap DeMarcus Cousins and keep an offensive rebound alive by tipping it back out to a teammate.

    With the qualifier that he's been limited to 15.3 minutes per game during Boston's recent three-game winning streak, it's hard to ignore how Olynyk owns a plus-17 net rating during his floor time (113.3 offensive rating; 96.3 defensive rating). He's also tops among Boston's regulars with a 13.2 percent offensive rebound rate in that span, and his assist rate is as glossy as some of the point guards.

    That's an encouraging sign, even in a small sample. For the season, Olynyk's defensive rating of 104.9 is second worst on the team (only Gerald Wallace currently owns a worse number among regulars). 

    Olynyk struggled with his shot early in the season and his advanced individual numbers are a bit of an eyesore (according to Synergy, he ranks in the 25th percentile averaging 0.812 points per play). No one is really sweating those numbers because his offense will almost certainly come in time.

    The key is getting Olynyk to understand Boston's defensive philosophies and thrive in the help system. What's more, he's also trying to get his body into NBA shape. Olynyk must navigate the tricky balance between bulking up without compromising the speed and athleticism that make him a 7-foot weapon on the offensive end.

    Regardless of how Boston's season plays out from here, the next three months are important for the development of young players like Olynyk. If the Celtics make any moves at the trade deadline, it could open up more consistent playing time.

    But coach Brad Stevens said he prefers that his players earn their time, and Olynyk must show that he's making progress and worthy of an extended opportunity, particularly now when Boston is logjammed at the frontcourt spots.

    After Olynyk was picked for the league's Rising Stars Challenge at All-Star Weekend, Stevens noted, "I think Kelly is just going through your typical rookie swings of good games, not-so-good games. That's part of being a rookie. And it's part of inconsistent minutes, too; it's hard to play inconsistent minutes."

    Not to put unfair expectations on Olynyk, but you look at someone like Jared Sullinger -- who is blossoming into a double-double machine in his second season in the league -- and wonder if Olynyk could see similar development, particularly on a team in transition. While the Celtics have stressed that they view Olynyk as a complementary player, he has an offensive skill set that Boston needs off its bench.

    Forget the comparisons to guys like Nowitzki; that kind of thing will take care of itself in time. Olynyk needs to immerse himself in getting better on the defensive end. Doing so could open doors to consistent playing time, which he needs to develop his game at this level.

    [/QUOTE]

    Good post. You know, I wanted nothing to do with Kelly up to last years draft. Of course, I wasn't looking at him as a stretch 4 either. I saw a 7 footer with no wing span, who had a good offensive game, but was slow and sucked at defending. Not much has surprised me other then his passing/court vision. Needless to say, summer league made me feel alot better about the pick, as well as understanding how Danny was envisioning Kelly's roll. I just wish he would be more aggressive out there with his shooting/offense. I'm a little shocked in fact, that Danny or Brad hasn't gotten on him more about it. The kid can shoot. Give him the green light.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    I agree - give him time to learn the teams defensive schemes, become more assertive with his shot, and get his body NBA ready before judging his overall production! 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from chris33. Show chris33's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    KO seems to be finally realizing he is seven feet tall.

    I am very proud of our team lately. They are playing with some toughness.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from charliedarling. Show charliedarling's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    I have been impressed with Olynik's improvements this year, but he (like most rookies) has a long way to go to be even mentioned in the same sentence as Nowitzke.

    He will be much better next year as he gets more experience and also starts to see more results from his weight training program.

    I believe that judging him next season will be a better indicator as to what he will be in his NBA career.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    On the possibility of many of our team being traded, I hope Oly stays. We waited patiently for Fab Melo to develop and he didn't but I would like to see Oly, Sully and have a lucky ping pong ball draft Embiid and maybe we could get the best back court since the Bird, Parrish & McHale days. And yup, I 'd like to be able to keep Rondo too who will be able to drive to the basket and pass to one of these towers !!!

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kyceltic. Show kyceltic's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...


    There's only one grand prize, but KO could turn our to be a nice consolation prize.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from BCSP. Show BCSP's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to kyceltic's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    There's only one grand prize, but KO could turn our to be a nice consolation prize.

    [/QUOTE]

    Last year Cleavland won the grand prize - then later found out it was not so grand! 

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from moskk. Show moskk's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DrBoogiebone's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    COMMENTARY Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ... But it's a fun comparison to consider as the Mavs make their lone visit to Boston Updated: February 9, 2014, 2:51 AM ET By Chris Forsberg | ESPNBoston.com

     

    WALTHAM, Mass. -- Let's play everyone's favorite game: Whose Stat Line is it Anyway?

    Player A: 8.2 pts, 3.4 reb, 20.4 mpg, 40.5 FG%, 20.6 3PT%, 12.8 PER

    Player B: 6.5 pts, 4.3 reb, 18.1 mpg, 42.3 FG%, 30.8 3PT%, 12.3 PER

    Hint: Both are rookie stat lines, 15 years apart. You have 30 seconds, good luck.

    [Jeopardy theme music]

    Player A is Dirk Nowitzki's rookie line in 47 games for the Dallas Mavericks during the 1998-99 campaign. Player B is Kelly Olynyk's stat line through 41 games this season for the Boston Celtics.

     

    Kelly Olynyk

     

    Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports Kelly Olynyk flashes great potential but must develop his game to earn more playing time.

     

    Now, let's be explicitly clear here: We are NOT suggesting that Olynyk is going to be an 11-time All-Star or league and Finals MVP who spends his entire career in one jersey. But consider this exercise a friendly reminder that it takes a little time for every rookie to find his place in the NBA.

    The jumping off point for this exercise is that Nowitzki and the Mavericks make their lone visit to TD Garden on Sunday to meet the streaking Celtics. It's the first time that Olynyk gets to share the NBA floor with one of his NBA idols.

    Yes, the flowing hair, the No. 41 jersey, the sweet-shooting stroke, Olynyk hasn't exactly run from that which inevitably leaves observers making the Nowitzki comparison. Olynyk is bashful when that chatter arises, saying he's humbled to even be mentioned in the same breath as a player with as decorated a career as Nowitzki.

    Comparisons to the man Gerald Wallace calls the "German Assassin" aside, a breakout performance at the Orlando summer league set first-year expectations for Olynyk unfairly high. The impatient types worry the Canadian 7-footer won't reach his potential, despite simply enduring the typical ups and downs of the NBA rookie.

    There have been glimpses of his potential along his first-year odyssey -- 25 points on 11-of-17 shooting against the Lakers last month, or 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting versus the Hawks on New Year's Eve -- but his playing time and production have been inconsistent. Even still, you can see progress in his game.

    While he's still a bit too hesitant with his shot, Olynyk has thrived recently by putting a focus on everything but his own offense. At times we've seen a more aggressive rebounder, a more competitive defender and a player content to facilitate offense with excellent passing skills.

    During Friday's win over the Sacramento Kings, Olynyk finished with 11 points on 3-of-5 shooting with nine rebounds, five assists and a steal. Multiple times he used his height to outleap DeMarcus Cousins and keep an offensive rebound alive by tipping it back out to a teammate.

    With the qualifier that he's been limited to 15.3 minutes per game during Boston's recent three-game winning streak, it's hard to ignore how Olynyk owns a plus-17 net rating during his floor time (113.3 offensive rating; 96.3 defensive rating). He's also tops among Boston's regulars with a 13.2 percent offensive rebound rate in that span, and his assist rate is as glossy as some of the point guards.

    That's an encouraging sign, even in a small sample. For the season, Olynyk's defensive rating of 104.9 is second worst on the team (only Gerald Wallace currently owns a worse number among regulars). 

    Olynyk struggled with his shot early in the season and his advanced individual numbers are a bit of an eyesore (according to Synergy, he ranks in the 25th percentile averaging 0.812 points per play). No one is really sweating those numbers because his offense will almost certainly come in time.

    The key is getting Olynyk to understand Boston's defensive philosophies and thrive in the help system. What's more, he's also trying to get his body into NBA shape. Olynyk must navigate the tricky balance between bulking up without compromising the speed and athleticism that make him a 7-foot weapon on the offensive end.

    Regardless of how Boston's season plays out from here, the next three months are important for the development of young players like Olynyk. If the Celtics make any moves at the trade deadline, it could open up more consistent playing time.

    But coach Brad Stevens said he prefers that his players earn their time, and Olynyk must show that he's making progress and worthy of an extended opportunity, particularly now when Boston is logjammed at the frontcourt spots.

    After Olynyk was picked for the league's Rising Stars Challenge at All-Star Weekend, Stevens noted, "I think Kelly is just going through your typical rookie swings of good games, not-so-good games. That's part of being a rookie. And it's part of inconsistent minutes, too; it's hard to play inconsistent minutes."

    Not to put unfair expectations on Olynyk, but you look at someone like Jared Sullinger -- who is blossoming into a double-double machine in his second season in the league -- and wonder if Olynyk could see similar development, particularly on a team in transition. While the Celtics have stressed that they view Olynyk as a complementary player, he has an offensive skill set that Boston needs off its bench.

    Forget the comparisons to guys like Nowitzki; that kind of thing will take care of itself in time. Olynyk needs to immerse himself in getting better on the defensive end. Doing so could open doors to consistent playing time, which he needs to develop his game at this level.

    [/QUOTE]

    Good post. You know, I wanted nothing to do with Kelly up to last years draft. Of course, I wasn't looking at him as a stretch 4 either. I saw a 7 footer with no wing span, who had a good offensive game, but was slow and sucked at defending. Not much has surprised me other then his passing/court vision. Needless to say, summer league made me feel alot better about the pick, as well as understanding how Danny was envisioning Kelly's roll. I just wish he would be more aggressive out there with his shooting/offense. I'm a little shocked in fact, that Danny or Brad hasn't gotten on him more about it. The kid can shoot. Give him the green light.

    [/QUOTE]

     

    I agree - give him time to learn the teams defensive schemes, become more assertive with his shot, and get his body NBA ready before judging his overall production! 

    [/QUOTE]

    Well written article and commentary that brushed the truth. Granted that KO needs to understand the Celtics defensive schemes but it goes much deeper. As long as KO is forced to play out of position as a center the coaching staff is remiss in not teaching him the basics of the position. KO does not strive for INSIDE position for rebounds, doesn't know how to create inside room on put-backs (for example jump backwards to unballance taller defenders behind him), shield his layups on put-backs, BLOCK_OUT around the hoop etc.

    As has been stressed numerous times KO needs to look for his offense too. He will NEVER develop that skill unless he masters the moves to be successful. As for improving his confidence, repetition in game time situations builds savy and improves production. The more he scores the more teammates will look for his offense.

     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kyceltic. Show kyceltic's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kyceltic's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    There's only one grand prize, but KO could turn our to be a nice consolation prize.

    [/QUOTE]

    Last year Cleavland won the grand prize - then later found out it was not so grand! 

    [/QUOTE] More like the boo b prize.


     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from rameakap. Show rameakap's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...


    Dirk had similar #'s to Olynyk when he was a 19-20 year old, not 22-23 year old coming off of 4 years of college ball.

    Also, Dirk's first season happened to be his first year in a new country leaving Germany behind AND took place during a lockout shortened nightmare where he couldn't train/integrate himself with his new teammates and coaching staff like you could in a normal year.

    By his age 22-23 Dirk was getting 23 points and 10 rebounds a game.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from hedleylamarr. Show hedleylamarr's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    Isn't it ironic that DAL drafted KO.......then traded him to us?

    How is Lucas Noguiera doing, btw?

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from rameakap. Show rameakap's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...


    Olynyk has 3 things going for him:

    1. He is 7' tall

    2. He has a high basketball IQ

    3. He has natural offensive skills, a soft touch, nice stroke on his shot, etc.

    He will not be Dirk, but he does compare (in my opinion) to several solid NBA players. I am looking at smart players who played mostly PF but some C, could shoot the 3 and were average defenders who used their intelligence and length to be above average help defenders. Guys who always got you 6-7 boards but never get you 9-10. That is what I see Kelly as.

    Sam Perkins and Cliff Robinson are good examples. They were 48% from the field 37% from the floor guys who got you 13-15 points and 6-7 rebounds consistently and were never one of the three best players on a contending team.

    Bill Laimbeer and Vlade Divac are two others who kind of fit, but Olynyk is going to be shooting three 3's a game and hitting one, while those two never shot 3's. He is also going to get 7-8 boards a game at best and not 9-11 like those two did.

    But that is how I see Kelly.

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from 37stories. Show 37stories's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to rameakap's comment:


    Olynyk has 3 things going for him:

    1. He is 7' tall

    2. He has a high basketball IQ

    3. He has natural offensive skills, a soft touch, nice stroke on his shot, etc.

    He will not be Dirk, but he does compare (in my opinion) to several solid NBA players. I am looking at smart players who played mostly PF but some C, could shoot the 3 and were average defenders who used their intelligence and length to be above average help defenders. Guys who always got you 6-7 boards but never get you 9-10. That is what I see Kelly as.

    Sam Perkins and Cliff Robinson are good examples. They were 48% from the field 37% from the floor guys who got you 13-15 points and 6-7 rebounds consistently and were never one of the three best players on a contending team.

    Bill Laimbeer and Vlade Divac are two others who kind of fit, but Olynyk is going to be shooting three 3's a game and hitting one, while those two never shot 3's. He is also going to get 7-8 boards a game at best and not 9-11 like those two did.

    But that is how I see Kelly.

     



    Like I said...Brad Miller. Miller was a good passer, a decent rebounder and a 3 point shooter.

    Perkins was 6 foot 9, Robinson was WAY more athletic than Oly.

     

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from chetgnat. Show chetgnat's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    There are no other Dirk Nowitzkis. He's unique and pretty much unstoppable. Those fallaways were carbon copies of LB33.

    But Olynyk has two really important things going for him - his intelligence and his attitude. These are good indicators that he will improve significantly as he gains experience. Sully could be the same way, or Sully could go know-it-all plateau quickly. That's a tougher call, even though Sully might already be ahead of Kelly's ceiling. If Sully keeps a good attitude and focuses on becoming a reliable post scoring threat, while Kelly learns the NBA game, develops some post moves of his own and incorporates that heady passing ability, then you could see a very good Celtics team within the next few years.

    If they both master a hook shot, you'll see a championship or two within 5 years.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from susan250. Show susan250's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kyceltic's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    There's only one grand prize, but KO could turn our to be a nice consolation prize.

    [/QUOTE]

    Last year Cleavland won the grand prize - then later found out it was not so grand! 

    [/QUOTE]

    That is Cleveland's fault.  They could have taken someone else instead of who they drafted.  He shouldn't have been the top pick. 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from hedleylamarr. Show hedleylamarr's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    Rame is correct about the age "thing".  KO will never  be Dirk, and the numbers are a little skewed based on age.

    KO will be a very nice "serviceable villian" ( yes, I watched the tribute last night), and I hope we hang on to him.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheNewGKDynasty. Show TheNewGKDynasty's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    COMMENTARY Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ... But it's a fun comparison to consider as the Mavs make their lone visit to Boston Updated: February 9, 2014, 2:51 AM ET By Chris Forsberg | ESPNBoston.com

     

    WALTHAM, Mass. -- Let's play everyone's favorite game: Whose Stat Line is it Anyway?

    Player A: 8.2 pts, 3.4 reb, 20.4 mpg, 40.5 FG%, 20.6 3PT%, 12.8 PER

    Player B: 6.5 pts, 4.3 reb, 18.1 mpg, 42.3 FG%, 30.8 3PT%, 12.3 PER

    Hint: Both are rookie stat lines, 15 years apart. You have 30 seconds, good luck.

    [Jeopardy theme music]

    Player A is Dirk Nowitzki's rookie line in 47 games for the Dallas Mavericks during the 1998-99 campaign. Player B is Kelly Olynyk's stat line through 41 games this season for the Boston Celtics.

     

    Kelly Olynyk

     

    Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports Kelly Olynyk flashes great potential but must develop his game to earn more playing time.

     

    Now, let's be explicitly clear here: We are NOT suggesting that Olynyk is going to be an 11-time All-Star or league and Finals MVP who spends his entire career in one jersey. But consider this exercise a friendly reminder that it takes a little time for every rookie to find his place in the NBA.

    The jumping off point for this exercise is that Nowitzki and the Mavericks make their lone visit to TD Garden on Sunday to meet the streaking Celtics. It's the first time that Olynyk gets to share the NBA floor with one of his NBA idols.

    Yes, the flowing hair, the No. 41 jersey, the sweet-shooting stroke, Olynyk hasn't exactly run from that which inevitably leaves observers making the Nowitzki comparison. Olynyk is bashful when that chatter arises, saying he's humbled to even be mentioned in the same breath as a player with as decorated a career as Nowitzki.

    Comparisons to the man Gerald Wallace calls the "German Assassin" aside, a breakout performance at the Orlando summer league set first-year expectations for Olynyk unfairly high. The impatient types worry the Canadian 7-footer won't reach his potential, despite simply enduring the typical ups and downs of the NBA rookie.

    There have been glimpses of his potential along his first-year odyssey -- 25 points on 11-of-17 shooting against the Lakers last month, or 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting versus the Hawks on New Year's Eve -- but his playing time and production have been inconsistent. Even still, you can see progress in his game.

    While he's still a bit too hesitant with his shot, Olynyk has thrived recently by putting a focus on everything but his own offense. At times we've seen a more aggressive rebounder, a more competitive defender and a player content to facilitate offense with excellent passing skills.

    During Friday's win over the Sacramento Kings, Olynyk finished with 11 points on 3-of-5 shooting with nine rebounds, five assists and a steal. Multiple times he used his height to outleap DeMarcus Cousins and keep an offensive rebound alive by tipping it back out to a teammate.

    With the qualifier that he's been limited to 15.3 minutes per game during Boston's recent three-game winning streak, it's hard to ignore how Olynyk owns a plus-17 net rating during his floor time (113.3 offensive rating; 96.3 defensive rating). He's also tops among Boston's regulars with a 13.2 percent offensive rebound rate in that span, and his assist rate is as glossy as some of the point guards.

    That's an encouraging sign, even in a small sample. For the season, Olynyk's defensive rating of 104.9 is second worst on the team (only Gerald Wallace currently owns a worse number among regulars). 

    Olynyk struggled with his shot early in the season and his advanced individual numbers are a bit of an eyesore (according to Synergy, he ranks in the 25th percentile averaging 0.812 points per play). No one is really sweating those numbers because his offense will almost certainly come in time.

    The key is getting Olynyk to understand Boston's defensive philosophies and thrive in the help system. What's more, he's also trying to get his body into NBA shape. Olynyk must navigate the tricky balance between bulking up without compromising the speed and athleticism that make him a 7-foot weapon on the offensive end.

    Regardless of how Boston's season plays out from here, the next three months are important for the development of young players like Olynyk. If the Celtics make any moves at the trade deadline, it could open up more consistent playing time.

    But coach Brad Stevens said he prefers that his players earn their time, and Olynyk must show that he's making progress and worthy of an extended opportunity, particularly now when Boston is logjammed at the frontcourt spots.

    After Olynyk was picked for the league's Rising Stars Challenge at All-Star Weekend, Stevens noted, "I think Kelly is just going through your typical rookie swings of good games, not-so-good games. That's part of being a rookie. And it's part of inconsistent minutes, too; it's hard to play inconsistent minutes."

    Not to put unfair expectations on Olynyk, but you look at someone like Jared Sullinger -- who is blossoming into a double-double machine in his second season in the league -- and wonder if Olynyk could see similar development, particularly on a team in transition. While the Celtics have stressed that they view Olynyk as a complementary player, he has an offensive skill set that Boston needs off its bench.

    Forget the comparisons to guys like Nowitzki; that kind of thing will take care of itself in time. Olynyk needs to immerse himself in getting better on the defensive end. Doing so could open doors to consistent playing time, which he needs to develop his game at this level.

    [/QUOTE]


    Oh how cute. He also thinks just like Fungy. Fungy most be very proud of his apprentice...

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from jgallag1. Show jgallag1's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to hedleylamarr's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Isn't it ironic that DAL drafted KO.......then traded him to us?

    How is Lucas Noguiera doing, btw?

    [/QUOTE]


    They traded him and a couple other pieces to Atlanta for Larkin.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from jgallag1. Show jgallag1's posts

    Re: Kelly Olynyk isn't Dirk Nowitzki ...

    In response to susan250's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to BCSP's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kyceltic's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    There's only one grand prize, but KO could turn our to be a nice consolation prize.

    [/QUOTE]

    Last year Cleavland won the grand prize - then later found out it was not so grand! 

    [/QUOTE]

    That is Cleveland's fault.  They could have taken someone else instead of who they drafted.  He shouldn't have been the top pick. 

    [/QUOTE]


    I'm not sure why everyone is beating Cleveland up quite so badly for that pick. As of now, there aren't many rookies out there that are big contributors. And if you put most of them into the toxic environment that is the Cavs locker room, I don't know if many of them fare any better.

     
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