What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

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    What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14

    Written by    Tim MacLean  on September 11th, 2013  

    For Avery Bradley, the 2013-14 campaign is one that will ultimately aide in determining the young guard’s NBA future. Currently in the last year of his rookie contract, the Celtics have until October 31 st  to sign Bradley to an extension. However should they fail to do so, Bradley will become a restricted free agent once the summer of 2014 commences.

    At this point in the offseason there hasn’t been much chatter of a potential contract extension for the former Texas Longhorn and, due to the recent passing of his mother, I don’t expect him to be talking numbers with the Celtics any time soon. After all, would you be negotiating a new contract while simultaneously mourning the loss of a loved one? Absolutely not. And nobody would expect you to.

    Bradley is fortunate enough to have already proven himself as a valuable piece throughout his three-year career. As a result, the question isn’t whether or not Bradley gets paid following the conclusion of the 2013-14 season, it’s whether or not the Celtics will be the organization paying him.

    Despite dealing with nagging shoulders injuries since entering the Association, Bradley has made a name for himself as a lockdown perimeter defender. With a career defensive rating of 103, Bradley uses both speed and toughness to contain some of the league’s best players and this year should be no different.

    But perhaps what makes Bradley so special is his ability to contribute on both ends of the floor. You look at a defensive stalwart like Tony Allen and you immediately recognize that he’s strictly one-dimensional. Bradley on the other hand showed us flashes of a knockdown jumper during the 2011-12 season. The Boston two-guard shot nearly 50 percent from the floor and converted on 40 percent of his three point tries. Unfortunately both of those numbers took a hit last year but I chock that up to Bradley coming off of double shoulder surgery during the summer of 2012.

    While it’s unlikely Bradley will be able to sustain those percentages from 2011-12 this upcoming season, I fully expect him to improve upon last year’s marks. And for the first time in his short career, Bradley will be asked to take more shots on a game to game basis due to the loss of Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett.

    With his first full, injury-free offseason under his belt heading into this year, expect Bradley to have his best season to date, especially on the offensive end of the floor. His exact role in the offense is uncertain but what we do know for sure is that Bradley will be getting a new pay day at the end of the season.

    Stat Projections:

    35.6 MPG, 14.2 PPG, 1.9 SPG, 37% 3-FG

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    AB should be able to average 15+ points per game, in 35+ minutes! 

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    Should The Celtics Extend Avery Bradley?

    Posted by Michael Pina on Aug 30, 2013Comments (11)

    The decision to place the word “should” in this article’s title, as opposed to the word “will,” is very important. If “will” sat in for “should,” the entire post could consist of three words: Hell no, probably.

    I won’t go so far as to say locking up Avery Bradley on a rookie scale contract extension before the NBA’s Nov. 1 deadline would be the absolute height of illogicality, but to do so before he’s able to prove he can stay healthy for an entire season while shouldering (no pun intended) a heavier role on both ends of the floor would be premature and borderline foolish.

    The Celtics are a rebuilding team, rightfully prickly about how they’ll allocate money over the long term. Bradley is a fine young player, far from a bust and more than capable of having an overall positive affect on a game’s outcome.

    But that doesn’t mean Boston won’t happily let the market dictate his price tag next summer. Again: “Will” they sign him? No (probably). However, “should” is the modal verb I’m using as clay to mold this column, which cracks the door open for discussion.

    How large of a contract do you, a knowledgeable Celtics fan, think Avery Bradley deserves? How much is too much? Keep in mind: Unless you’re Avery Bradley, a member of his family, or his agent, there’s no such thing as too little.

    Also keep in mind, this payment is based on what type of player Bradley will grow to become. Not who he was last year, or the year before. Boston (hopefully) wouldn’t be committing themselves to an incredibly disappointing enigma who played awful in all but the final four minutes of a sad six game series against New York last spring.

    His PER was an atrocious 6.7 in that series, and an even more depressing 8.8 in 50 starts during the 2012-13 regular season, when he shot 40.2% from the floor, dribbling the ball, attempting layups in traffic, and entering passes into the post like his wrists were shot with a dangerous amount of Novocain.

    No matter how dominant he is on defense, guards can’t do what he did on offense last year and be on the floor for 35 minutes for a successful team. 

    The closest comparison Bradley has right now is former Celtics guard Tony Allen. Bradley’s nearly a decade younger, and has the potential to stretch his team’s offense by catching, shooting, and knocking down open threes from the corner. But other than that their playing styles are symmetrically chaotic.

    Earlier this summer the 31-year-old Allen re-signed with Memphis for $20 million over four years. Allen almost certainly won’t get any better on either end of the floor in the future. But for all he offers on the defensive end—and immeasurably  as a tough, hard-working, positive locker room influence—the deal is a fair one within the context of Memphis’ current stature.

    Do you, intelligent Celtics fan, think Bradley is worth that price? (Your answer should be an emphatic yes.) What about somewhere around $30-36 million. Can you sport a competitive team with Avery Bradley making $7-9 million per year over the next four seasons? Of course you can, especially after factoring in his value as a movable trade chip.

    It’s modestly safe to say Bradley will never be an All-Star, and it’s tough to figure out if he’ll ever be the third or fourth best player on a championship contender. (I hate writing stuff like that because if the two best players on his team were 1990 Michael Jordan and 1995 Hakeem Olajuwon, there’s a good chance that team wins the title.)

    Historically, an absolute best case scenario for Bradley’s career might be Maurice Cheeks, who was first-team All-Defense four years in a row as a point guard for a string of some criminally underrated Philadelphia 76ers teams (including the 1983 world champs, a team that’s one of the best in basketball history). Where the comparison gets ugly is on offense, where Cheeks was an incredible passer with amazing vision, made four All-Star teams, and was efficient scoring the ball.

    Bradley’s a little bigger, stronger, and exponentially more athletic, which makes it fun for us to speculate on where his ceiling lies. But after watching him last year it’s tough to envision the crucial, consistent play Cheeks gave those contending teams in Philadelphia. (Also: Bradley will never be half the point guard Cheeks was, in part because Bradley will never play point guard full-time.)

    I don’t mean to turn an article about how the Boston Celtics should spend their money into “Avery Bradley’s Unmitigated Destiny,” but to ignore the thin yarn connecting these two subjects would be to write something incomplete.

    I possess no antipathy towards Bradley. Instead I feel our expectations for his potential are unfairly great. Over the past two seasons, Bradley was viewed as a literal game-changer by Celtics fans. Had he been healthy and able to cover Dwyane Wade in 2012, the Celtics would have reached the NBA Finals, says the entire city of Boston.

    When the team got off to a sluggish start in 2013—sans Bradley, who was slowly recovering from offseason surgery on both shoulders—everyone figured the Celtics would turn things around when he returned.

    His individual strengths aligned perfectly with the team’s identity, making him easy to root for. But it’s imperative people don’t forget that Bradley positively influenced a group that didn’t need a new engine (or even an oil change), merely cutting-edge headlights.

    Bradley’s skill-set is rare and increasingly important now that defense is so obviously the key to winning championships in modern day NBA basketball (especially from the perimeter), but it’s also limited. And while the most optimistic fan loves imagining his offensive game one day catching up to where he’s at guarding the ball (somewhere between first and fifth overall in the universe), that line of thinking just isn’t very realistic.

    That said, slim chance Boston loses him outright as a restricted free agent. He’s too valuable as an intriguing piece in any pending assets-for-superstar deal for that to happen, complicating things even further.

    The counterargument supporting why Boston should re-up Bradley before the deadline is the same one every team faces when deciding whether to extend a player who’s on his rookie contract. What if Bradley becomes a dependable scorer in 2014? What if his offensive game flourishes, his market price as a restricted free agent increases, and the Celtics lose him for nothing?

    It’s possible. But so is the New York Jets winning the Super Bowl before 2056, or Breaking Bad concluding with Walt and Hank hashing their issues out with a long hug and some hot cocoa.

    Nobody knows the future, but in this case there’s enough evidence in the present to make the picture less blurry. Bradley’s defense is special, but his future in this league is probably that of a glorified role player. The Celtics won’t rush here, and that’s a good thing!

       
     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    I think the fact that he is currently experiencing a full and healthy off season is being underplayed. For the first time in his NBA career he is healthy and can work on his game and better himself. I expect his shooting to improve especially at the 2 with Rondo back

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    I am expecting big things from Avery this season. Avery has had a tough go health wise his first years with us and now finally he is healthy and able to work on honing his game instead just trying to get to where he can be healthy enough to get on the floor. He is one of the main reasons why  I expect us to greatly exceed the naysayers and actually be better team. Even if Rondo is out until Dec/Jan, I feel AB will bve more prepared both physically and mentally to be up to the challenge of playing both the 1 and 2. I also believe we will see a resurgance in Courtney Lees' game as well.

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    In response to BCSP's comment:

    What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14

    Written by    Tim MacLean  on September 11th, 2013  

    For Avery Bradley, the 2013-14 campaign is one that will ultimately aide in determining the young guard’s NBA future. Currently in the last year of his rookie contract, the Celtics have until October 31 st  to sign Bradley to an extension. However should they fail to do so, Bradley will become a restricted free agent once the summer of 2014 commences.

    At this point in the offseason there hasn’t been much chatter of a potential contract extension for the former Texas Longhorn and, due to the recent passing of his mother, I don’t expect him to be talking numbers with the Celtics any time soon. After all, would you be negotiating a new contract while simultaneously mourning the loss of a loved one? Absolutely not. And nobody would expect you to.

    Bradley is fortunate enough to have already proven himself as a valuable piece throughout his three-year career. As a result, the question isn’t whether or not Bradley gets paid following the conclusion of the 2013-14 season, it’s whether or not the Celtics will be the organization paying him.

    Despite dealing with nagging shoulders injuries since entering the Association, Bradley has made a name for himself as a lockdown perimeter defender. With a career defensive rating of 103, Bradley uses both speed and toughness to contain some of the league’s best players and this year should be no different.

    But perhaps what makes Bradley so special is his ability to contribute on both ends of the floor. You look at a defensive stalwart like Tony Allen and you immediately recognize that he’s strictly one-dimensional. Bradley on the other hand showed us flashes of a knockdown jumper during the 2011-12 season. The Boston two-guard shot nearly 50 percent from the floor and converted on 40 percent of his three point tries. Unfortunately both of those numbers took a hit last year but I chock that up to Bradley coming off of double shoulder surgery during the summer of 2012.

    While it’s unlikely Bradley will be able to sustain those percentages from 2011-12 this upcoming season, I fully expect him to improve upon last year’s marks. And for the first time in his short career, Bradley will be asked to take more shots on a game to game basis due to the loss of Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett.

    With his first full, injury-free offseason under his belt heading into this year, expect Bradley to have his best season to date, especially on the offensive end of the floor. His exact role in the offense is uncertain but what we do know for sure is that Bradley will be getting a new pay day at the end of the season.

    Stat Projections:

    35.6 MPG, 14.2 PPG, 1.9 SPG, 37% 3-FG




    He will be Marshoon Brooks back up.He will come  in for defense .

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    Best Case Scenario - Bradley regains his outside shot AND successfully develops starting PG skills.  

    Worst Case Scenrio - Bradley does not regain his shooting touch, does not improve his ball handling skills, suffers recurring shoulder problems, is compromised on D by taller SGs and is traded for squat.   

    Most likely - Some improvement in shooting.  Some improvement in ball handling, but not enough to play the point with any regularity and becomes our defensive stopper, playing 20MPG while sharing minutes with the other SGs as more of a situational player.  

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    In response to Eldunker's comment:

    Best Case Scenario - Bradley regains his outside shot AND successfully develops starting PG skills.  

    Worst Case Scenrio - Bradley does not regain his shooting touch, does not improve his ball handling skills, suffers recurring shoulder problems, is compromised on D by taller SGs and is traded for squat.   

    Most likely - Some improvement in shooting.  Some improvement in ball handling, but not enough to play the point with any regularity and becomes our defensive stopper, playing 20MPG while sharing minutes with the other SGs as more of a situational player.  



    Hammer meet nail.

     
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    Re: What to Expect From Avery Bradley in 2013-14!

    7-9 Millions a year?  You lost me right there, not a chance IMO.  For all the flaws that Tony Allen may have, I'd take him over Bradley any day.

     
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