Alex

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    Alex

    the Prep clearly playing well as they always seem to late in the season... why do you think?  how can a coach help his team going into the tournament?  ie., what are the keys to success at the state tournament level?  i have always been curious what separates Madison Park from Lexington? in general and historically...

    it is such an interesting question...
     
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    Re: Alex

    A thread about me, can I go on about my lifetime accomplishments? ;)

    I think heading into the 2010 tournament season, depth has been more and more of a factor. Not only do players get tired over the course of a game, but they get tired over a series of games leading to the state championship. A coach can run and condition his players, but nobody can go max effort for 80 minutes. Although it may look like player's are giving their max effort and I'm sure they are, however after a series of hard runs through out the game, lactate builds into your legs, causing your sprints to be slower.

    Winchester "may" have the better team on paper, however if Winchester does get to play CC,  and it won't be until the north finals because of their records, Winchester won't have the legs to compete with CC. Sure if Winchester played CC tomorrow they could beat them. It's important for Winchester to get a good draw in their first few games, if they get too many tough opponents early on, they won't have much of a prayer against CC.

    I think it's also important for the coach to train all his players equally, not just the star players or starters. A coach needs to have confidence in his/her ability to put subs in with a 3-0 lead and 20 minutes left to give his starter's some rest, mostly in the early round games. The coach needs to have confidence in his subs to give some quality minutes and hold the lead.

    Well Sandwich was able to do it? Sure, however after watching a video on youtube, the starter's on that team were extremely talented. They also won every game by just one goal and didn't really play any team that strong until they hit Concord-Carlisle. Dedham, Medfield, Duxbury and Hopkinton, these teams were okay but the starters weren't really close to the caliber of Sandwich's starters from last year. And of course, most of these teams probably didn't have the depth either.

    I'm hoping someone will vid tape a MP park game once they get into the tougher opponents, this way I could disect the difference between a Lex and MP.

    *Also, meant to add that in D-3 you can very much get away with having very little depth and relying on your starters, however this is much harder to accomplish at D-1 and D-2.
     
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    Re: Alex

    Soccer fan 12 I think there are numerous differences between MP and Lexington.  Coaching an economically challenge team such as MP is so different from Lexington which has great soccer from the youth level to high school.  Lexington I'm guessing has quality coaching that begins at the youth level resulting in talented players that understand a team concept, positional play, attacking and defending and other aspects of the game.  In MP you find maybe a few players that have been well coached, but they mainly hone there skills by playing soccer and almost only soccer throughout their lives and figuring out what works and what doesn't.  MP players I'm guessing are technically sound.  They probably play a brand of soccer that is less kick and run and more skill.  Not saying that Lexington players are not skilled, they are, but the playing style is quite different. 
     
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    Re: Alex

    This is very interesting...

    Teams like Lexington do in fact have all those opportunities from youth levels up. Majority of players from this area are affiliated with club teams, such as Aztec, FC Blazers, Stars of MA, or even Academy teams. Inner city teams like MP, East Boston, Malden, Somerville, Everett and Chelsea, have maybe one player affiliated with club, if their lucky.

    Last year, Everett had Felix, a Revolution academy player, and a player from Aztec. Thats 2 out of an 18 player roster, and now Felix is gone, so 1. Malden this year has 1 Academy player in Rincon and that's it. So concepts such as offside traps and a player's role at a certain position aren't understood. Whereas Lexington, Prep, etc. All play club somewhere and are constantly playing so they all understand basic concepts that inner city teams do not. I don't mean to point out inner city kids, but it's where majority of people cannot afford to play for $1000 clubs. However, inner city kids are skilled, just lack discipline and structure in playing as a team. Kids from elite programs have known these sorts of things since they were U12 players...
     
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    Re: Alex

    true -- it is too bad -- the skill level of inner city immigrant players and the technical ability is amazing -- if only tactics were reinforced more by city coaches...
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from RUsoccer. Show RUsoccer's posts

    Re: Alex

    This is exactly what the Academy structure was developed for. To give the talented players without the resources ($$$) for the pay to play clubs or ODP an opportunity to be identified. It gives the US National team program a larger pool of players to choose from and develop. The US Academy program was only started in recent years and is built off the model used with european clubs and national teams. Hopefully with its recent success it will be expanded to younger age groups. By the time a player reaches HS age, it is too late to properly develop a player with technical and tactical abilities needed at the highest levels of soccer. Also more youth and high school coaches need to educate themselves on what club, ODP and academy actually is, so that our young talented players know what opportunities are available to them and can be pointed in the right direction.  
     
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    Re: Alex

    A lot of the other guys seem to have extensive knowledge about club soccer, more than I could help you with. Lots of ineteresting info here.
     
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