A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

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    A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    NFL free agency inspires caution among league's winning teamsBy Albert BreerNFL Media reporterPublished: March 10, 2014 at 12:55 p.m.Updated: March 10, 2014 at 05:30 p.m.58 Likes 

    If the NFL truly is a copycat league, then maybe we have our explanation as to why the free agency market seems to have gotten less splashy of late.

     

    "This is Year 3 of the new CBA climate, and we're all more familiar with the rules," one veteran AFC pro director said. "Teams are trying to achieve success in a cap era where spending smart is vital, and the ability to consistently retain cap flexibility is equally important..Culturally , there's an emphasis on drafting your own and developing your own.

    Winning teams have proven adept at doing just that : out-drafting and out-developing the competition

    Conversely, they generally aren't winning much on days like this Tuesday, when the 2014 free agency period begins. And so, as we all ring the bell in anticipation for the grand opening of the market, the most instructive practice might be to watch the movements of the clubs avoiding the early action.

     

    . A study of the 12 playoff teams from last season revealed that the league's elite use free agency to augment rather than overhaul.  A

    mong the five highest-paid players on each playoff participant in 2013 -- a pool of 60 players total -- 42 represented home-grown talent while eight were acquired via trade.  Just 10 were free-agent additions

    That list of 10 does include the Denver Broncos' Peyton Manning and the New Orleans Saints' Drew Brees, who were both coming off injuries that prompted their drafting clubs (the Colts and Chargers, respectively) to move on. After that, there were three offensive linemen (Gosder Cherilus with the Colts, Louis Vasquez with the Broncosand Ben Grubbs with the Saints), three defensive backs (Carlos Rogers with the 49ers, Derek Cox with the Chargers and LaRon Landry with the Colts) and two receivers (Wes Welker with the Broncos and Sidney Rice with the Seahawks).

     

    Add it up, and you can see why general managers might have a hard time getting excited for a shopping spree.

     

    "Established teams usually aren't involved," an AFC personnel exec said. "It's the teams struggling to make it to the next step. There's a sense of desperation there to throw money at the top guys. They don't think it'll hurt them, but then the guy doesn't produce. The Redskins, Buffalo, the Dolphins, theBrowns -- teams that historically come out strong and pay, they usually haven't drafted well, so there's not as much continuity. And it's no coincidence there's been a lot of turnover in those organizations."

     

    There is a right way to do it, of course. A team might even hit on a big-ticket item. But discipline, the smart ones say, is the key.

     

    So in advance of the market opening, we talked to a handful of decision-makers to compile the following list of guiding principles to which teams try to hold fast as the dollars start flying:  

    ans finding out why a free agent is free in the first place. In most cases, guys who make it to free agency are, by definition, not core players. The trouble is that, in the first couple days of the league year, they wind up getting paid like they are.

     

    "Teams covet their own, protect their own -- why is this guy free?" an NFC general manager said. "In some cases, it might be the team's third-best player, and he may be the best player on another team, and their own club just can't afford him. There are other cases where the team is making legitimate attempts and can't come to a deal. Or maybe the guy doesn't like the city or the stability of the club."

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    But the bottom line is this: If it's a player you have to have, you find a way to keep him in-house.

     

     

     one sense, this principle is about projecting a player from one system to the next. But even more pronounced is the problem of projecting a role player into a more prominent spot.

     

    One that stands out is signing someone else's No. 2 receiver to be your No. 1. That's where the biggest mistakes are; those almost always fail," one NFC club executive said. "You can go through the list; that, to me, is always the cautionary tale. True No. 1 receivers usually don't become free agents. Same goes for pass rushers who have another really good rusher (to play) with, and get sacks, but their play doesn't match their sack total. It's players on good teams who have better stats because of cumulative team effect."

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The exec pointed to Alvin Harper (Dallas to Tampa Bay), Peerless Price (Buffalo to Atlanta) and David Givens (New England to Tennessee) as examples of receivers who fall into that category. Paul Kruger and Adalius Thomas -- who bolted Baltimore for Cleveland and New England, respectively -- fit that bill as pass rushers. And expected early signee Eric Decker is a guy in this year's class who could fall along those lines.

     

    »  The idea of hoarding compensatory picks might sound trivial, but some of the best (New England, Baltimore) don't view it like that. And sometimes, how a player got free or when he's available can push the pendulum one way or the other.

     

    In other words, if you lose four and sign two, you'll get picks. If it's even or going the other way, you won't. But there's room to maneuver.

     

    If a player is cut, he doesn't count toward the compensatory-pick equation, which explains why thePatriots moved quickly on Cardinals cast-off Adrian Wilson last year. And the same is true of players brought in after June 1, as was the case with the Ravens' signing of Daryl Smith last summer.

     

    »  Some were surprised that Sam Shields received a four-year deal at $9.75 million per year from the Packers over the weekend, but whatever one might think of the contract, it's hard to argue that it represented a shot in the dark for Green Bay, which has had the 26-year-old cornerback in-house for four years. If the Packers had chosen instead to acquire someone from the outside, they would've been bringing in an athlete that they inherently would have had less information about.

     

    "You're probably gonna overpay somewhere, and if you overpay for Peyton Manning or DeMarcus Wareor Richard Sherman, the elite players, that's OK," the AFC personnel exec said. "Where you really get in trouble is when you overpay for Paul Kruger. You set yourself back, because now that guy is making $8 million a year, and he's probably a $4 million-a-year player. ... You have to be strong with your evaluation of the player and avoid getting caught up in need."

     

    As we head into spending season, Adam Scheinidentifies the most hazardous players hitting the NFL's open market. 

     

    Part of the evaluation is, again, figuring out who a guy is and why he's free, whether it's because of financial reasons or something rooted in performance or character. If you're going to shake up your salary structure on anyone, in-house or not -- and other guys on the team will notice -- you have to try to know what you're buying and what message it will send, something that's much easier to do with a player who has been around your block.

     

    ******

     

    And all of this said, it's not like there's any one way to do it.

     

    The two outliers among the 12 teams studied above happened to be the two that made it to the Super Bowl. Seattle traded for Marshawn Lynch, Percy Harvin and Chris Clemons and signed Rice (who hassince been released), leaving Russell Okung as the only home-grown player in its top five last year. Denver counted Manning, Welker and Vasquez as free-agent additions and traded for Champ Bailey (who was also recently released) way back when, making Ryan Clady the lone lifetime Bronco in the high-rent district of the payroll for 2013.

     

    But even with regard to those teams , the situation will correct itself when guys like Sherman , Earl Thomas , Russell Wilson , Demaryius Thomas , Julius Thomas and Von Miller get paid . In fact , the very reason those teams could be so aggressive with  other clubs ' players was because they had a solid core in place , with players still playing on rookie deals

    There outside factors that could drive the market again. There are fewer locales where coaches and GMs are on the hot seat -- owners are quicker to fire these days, meaning some of the would-be "win or else" situations have been eliminated -- but those decision-makers still facing such scenarios might yet spread some money around. Also, the minimum spending threshold could pressure clubs like Oakland, Jacksonville and Cleveland to start playing catch-up soon.

     

     

    For the most part, though, the teams around the league have become wise to the fallacies of free agency. More than two decades in, the moves clubs make are generally more methodical and -- even more so -- marked by the mistakes others have made in the past.

     

    As the NFC exec says, "Free agents are free for a reason."

     

    So the race might be on when Tuesday comes. But if you want to find the winners, you might want to look for the guys who are waiting to leave the starting blocks.

     

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    BB is brilliant that is not under debate. 

    But: some of us, myself included, believe there is merit in making a more aggressive championship push when your window with your QB is closing - just as Denver looks primed to do. I for one would not mind a drop off for a year or two if we can win another ring. But that's not how Kraft likes to do things, nor BB. 

    Also: some of us, myself included, are concerned that BB's personnel philosophy is not quite in tune with today's NFL. The cornerback position is one prime example, and I'll be watching that closely. Sometimes you do have to pay a premium for talent in areas where your draft was unsuccessful. 

    That said I don't believe in either giving BB a ring for how he manages the cap or condemning him for moves I didn't like either. I'll judge the result on the field. 

    My gut feeling is BB is going to shift a bit in his personnel approach. I"m encouraged about the early news on both Talib and Edelman as one small example. We'll see.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Pats-bilbo. Show Pats-bilbo's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    If you add in that Free Agency is only part of the puzzle of building the team. You have your own guys, guys cut from other teams, Free Agency, Drafting and trades.... there are a lot of moving parts and pieces. So if you think you can get a good pass rusher in the draft, you are probably not going to go in big for one in FA.....

    This is good explanation for this.... another way to think about it... Seattle and 49ers have 2nd or third year QB's that are getting less than 2 Mil per year (I think) and if they had to pay for a top flight QB in FA or by trade it would be costing them 8-10 Mil.... this is a big savings and allows adding in other pieces through trades or FA or signing your own players.... 

    This is not checkers it is 3 dimensional chess with one eye blinded....

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from seattlepat70. Show seattlepat70's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:

    BB is brilliant that is not under debate. 

    But: some of us, myself included, believe there is merit in making a more aggressive championship push when your window with your QB is closing - just as Denver looks primed to do. I for one would not mind a drop off for a year or two if we can win another ring. But that's not how Kraft likes to do things, nor BB. 

    Also: some of us, myself included, are concerned that BB's personnel philosophy is not quite in tune with today's NFL. The cornerback position is one prime example, and I'll be watching that closely. Sometimes you do have to pay a premium for talent in areas where your draft was unsuccessful. 

    That said I don't believe in either giving BB a ring for how he manages the cap or condemning him for moves I didn't like either. I'll judge the result on the field. 

    My gut feeling is BB is going to shift a bit in his personnel approach. I"m encouraged about the early news on both Talib and Edelman as one small example. We'll see.



    1) You believe the Pats' window is closing as TB's career is coming to an end. He does not. Is that really har dto understand?

    2) He has never followed convention for the sake of following convention. They were a win away from hoisting the Lombardi two years ago. They were a win away from playing in teh SB again. Do you really expect him to think there is something wrong with his approach? Do you think other coaches or GMs think he makes the wrong moves a lot?

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kjfitone. Show kjfitone's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to seattlepat70's comment:

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:

    BB is brilliant that is not under debate. 

    But: some of us, myself included, believe there is merit in making a more aggressive championship push when your window with your QB is closing - just as Denver looks primed to do. I for one would not mind a drop off for a year or two if we can win another ring. But that's not how Kraft likes to do things, nor BB. 

    Also: some of us, myself included, are concerned that BB's personnel philosophy is not quite in tune with today's NFL. The cornerback position is one prime example, and I'll be watching that closely. Sometimes you do have to pay a premium for talent in areas where your draft was unsuccessful. 

    That said I don't believe in either giving BB a ring for how he manages the cap or condemning him for moves I didn't like either. I'll judge the result on the field. 

    My gut feeling is BB is going to shift a bit in his personnel approach. I"m encouraged about the early news on both Talib and Edelman as one small example. We'll see.



    1) You believe the Pats' window is closing as TB's career is coming to an end. He does not. Is that really har dto understand?

    2) He has never followed convention for the sake of following convention. They were a win away from hoisting the Lombardi two years ago. They were a win away from playing in teh SB again. Do you really expect him to think there is something wrong with his approach? Do you think other coaches or GMs think he makes the wrong moves a lot?


    yeah thats a good way to look at it. bb doesnt think the window closes when brady retires. hes building the team to continue being elite with who ever plays qb next. not bad thinking because if they go overboard now they could suffer for years. 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to kjfitone's comment:

    In response to seattlepat70's comment:

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:

    BB is brilliant that is not under debate. 

    But: some of us, myself included, believe there is merit in making a more aggressive championship push when your window with your QB is closing - just as Denver looks primed to do. I for one would not mind a drop off for a year or two if we can win another ring. But that's not how Kraft likes to do things, nor BB. 

    Also: some of us, myself included, are concerned that BB's personnel philosophy is not quite in tune with today's NFL. The cornerback position is one prime example, and I'll be watching that closely. Sometimes you do have to pay a premium for talent in areas where your draft was unsuccessful. 

    That said I don't believe in either giving BB a ring for how he manages the cap or condemning him for moves I didn't like either. I'll judge the result on the field. 

    My gut feeling is BB is going to shift a bit in his personnel approach. I"m encouraged about the early news on both Talib and Edelman as one small example. We'll see.



    1) You believe the Pats' window is closing as TB's career is coming to an end. He does not. Is that really har dto understand?

    2) He has never followed convention for the sake of following convention. They were a win away from hoisting the Lombardi two years ago. They were a win away from playing in teh SB again. Do you really expect him to think there is something wrong with his approach? Do you think other coaches or GMs think he makes the wrong moves a lot?


    yeah thats a good way to look at it. bb doesnt think the window closes when brady retires. hes building the team to continue being elite with who ever plays qb next. not bad thinking because if they go overboard now they could suffer for years. 




    Once Brady is gone, BB is toast.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from fourjays30. Show fourjays30's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:

    In response to kjfitone's comment:

    In response to seattlepat70's comment:

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:

    BB is brilliant that is not under debate. 

    But: some of us, myself included, believe there is merit in making a more aggressive championship push when your window with your QB is closing - just as Denver looks primed to do. I for one would not mind a drop off for a year or two if we can win another ring. But that's not how Kraft likes to do things, nor BB. 

    Also: some of us, myself included, are concerned that BB's personnel philosophy is not quite in tune with today's NFL. The cornerback position is one prime example, and I'll be watching that closely. Sometimes you do have to pay a premium for talent in areas where your draft was unsuccessful. 

    That said I don't believe in either giving BB a ring for how he manages the cap or condemning him for moves I didn't like either. I'll judge the result on the field. 

    My gut feeling is BB is going to shift a bit in his personnel approach. I"m encouraged about the early news on both Talib and Edelman as one small example. We'll see.



    1) You believe the Pats' window is closing as TB's career is coming to an end. He does not. Is that really har dto understand?

    2) He has never followed convention for the sake of following convention. They were a win away from hoisting the Lombardi two years ago. They were a win away from playing in teh SB again. Do you really expect him to think there is something wrong with his approach? Do you think other coaches or GMs think he makes the wrong moves a lot?


    yeah thats a good way to look at it. bb doesnt think the window closes when brady retires. hes building the team to continue being elite with who ever plays qb next. not bad thinking because if they go overboard now they could suffer for years. 




    Once Brady is gone, BB is toast.




    Too bad you have no data to back up that assumption. Seeing what he did with a backup like Cassel I would say the odds of him not being sucessfull are pretty long.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    Well written piece that pretty much lays it out.  I am also of the opinion that although the window may be closing on Brady, it is not necessarily closing on the Pats. 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from seawolfxs. Show seawolfxs's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    This whole article supports what I have agreed with BB on, ( see post on how Bb values) Don't overpay for Brand name FAs

    And Seattle Pat, you are right Bb  is not a slave to conventional wisdom, He sets C W as he has here

    Someone posted howBb pays more to the lower tiered players and more of them than others. If we want to debate something we should debate that strategy

    There was another post on how a talent website, had a chart with the current players under contract, evaluated by position the level of the player, I would love to see the top teams that way

    But getting hi priced FAs doesnot mean you are going to win the SB. If you can find them.There is no FA this year that floats my boat at elite money. only Oline would make me think twice. It's why Wendell is gone,Connoly is still here as he may be an upgrade at center to move cannon to guard , maybe I don't know

    And again the pats lost two SBs by two all pros dropping passes, Samuels spick six and WW ( seen that play so much, he should have caught the ball, but if you think not than it was another all pro HoF who missed it)

    Just because TB is coming to the end BB shouldn't be chasing rainbows and spending on hi priced FA

    Besides, BB is the best coach in developing players there is. and that includes both sides of the ball, and that includes TB. Hecknew his value as a pick, kept him as 4th qb, wouldn't trade him and has had a weekly meeting since the beginning.And TB has worked hard at it

    And in the end great coaches need great players.The players have to make plays to win the game.My bugaboo this year is Oline. parcels told us the most important RE is behind the center and our olone has not been it's best in most if not all our playoff losses against good Ds. 

    I had thought with all of the really good front sevens we played last year, that we would be okay, but we weren't against the donkeys

     

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to fourjays30's comment:

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:

    In response to kjfitone's comment:

    In response to seattlepat70's comment:

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:

    BB is brilliant that is not under debate. 

    But: some of us, myself included, believe there is merit in making a more aggressive championship push when your window with your QB is closing - just as Denver looks primed to do. I for one would not mind a drop off for a year or two if we can win another ring. But that's not how Kraft likes to do things, nor BB. 

    Also: some of us, myself included, are concerned that BB's personnel philosophy is not quite in tune with today's NFL. The cornerback position is one prime example, and I'll be watching that closely. Sometimes you do have to pay a premium for talent in areas where your draft was unsuccessful. 

    That said I don't believe in either giving BB a ring for how he manages the cap or condemning him for moves I didn't like either. I'll judge the result on the field. 

    My gut feeling is BB is going to shift a bit in his personnel approach. I"m encouraged about the early news on both Talib and Edelman as one small example. We'll see.



    1) You believe the Pats' window is closing as TB's career is coming to an end. He does not. Is that really har dto understand?

    2) He has never followed convention for the sake of following convention. They were a win away from hoisting the Lombardi two years ago. They were a win away from playing in teh SB again. Do you really expect him to think there is something wrong with his approach? Do you think other coaches or GMs think he makes the wrong moves a lot?


    yeah thats a good way to look at it. bb doesnt think the window closes when brady retires. hes building the team to continue being elite with who ever plays qb next. not bad thinking because if they go overboard now they could suffer for years. 




    Once Brady is gone, BB is toast.




    Too bad you have no data to back up that assumption. Seeing what he did with a backup like Cassel I would say the odds of him not being sucessfull are pretty long.




    No data hunh?

    What did he do with Cassel again? Oh yeah, missed the playoffs against the weakest schedule he has ever played.

    The data shows without Brady he has one playoff berth in 7 seasons.

    The data also shows he has made the playoffs 11 times in 12 seasons with Brady.

     

    Is that enough data for you, or would you like more?

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to ATJ's comment:

    Well written piece that pretty much lays it out.  I am also of the opinion that although the window may be closing on Brady, it is not necessarily closing on the Pats. 




    You're wrong. I guarantee it.

     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    How come you didn't highlight this paragraph?

    The two outliers among the 12 teams studied above happened to be the two that made it to the Super Bowl. Seattle traded for Marshawn Lynch, Percy Harvin and Chris Clemons and signed Rice (who hassince been released), leaving Russell Okung as the only home-grown player in its top five last year. Denver counted Manning, Welker and Vasquez as free-agent additions and traded for Champ Bailey (who was also recently released) way back when, making Ryan Clady the lone lifetime Bronco in the high-rent district of the payroll for 2013.

     

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    The reality, as I've said plenty of times, is there is a lot of merit to preserving flexibility and, of course, building through the draft.  Young, good, inexpensive players are great to have on your team.

    But to win championships you also need good talent.  It's really hard to get top talent through the draft when you're picking late in the first round and in the mid or lower rounds.  If you also refuse to invest in any good free agents, you run a very big risk of ending up with a talent-deficient team.

    Look, I go by what I see in the games.  The Pats starting line up on defense in the 2011 Super Bowl included Love and Deaderick on the D line, Tracy White at LB, Arrington at right corner, and Chung and Ihedigbo at safety.  The good players were Wilfork and Mayo.  McCourty was struggling at corner that year, and the other two starters (Nink and Spikes) are just okay.  The back-ups included Sterling Moore, Antwaun Molden, Sergio Brown, Malcolm Williams, Fletcher, Koutouvides, Ellis, Anderson, and Warren. Of that group, only Anderson wasn't a total scrub or washed-up old person. 

    Does anyone really want to argue that that was a talented defense? A championship defense? Please, look at the team without the rose-coloured homer specs on.  That was a crappy, talent-deficient defense and it played like one, allowing the Giants to average over 4 minutes a drive (twice the NFL average) and score on half of their drives. 

     

     

     

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    How come you didn't highlight this paragraph?

    The two outliers among the 12 teams studied above happened to be the two that made it to the Super Bowl. Seattle traded for Marshawn Lynch, Percy Harvin and Chris Clemons and signed Rice (who hassince been released), leaving Russell Okung as the only home-grown player in its top five last year. Denver counted Manning, Welker and Vasquez as free-agent additions and traded for Champ Bailey (who was also recently released) way back when, making Ryan Clady the lone lifetime Bronco in the high-rent district of the payroll for 2013.

     

     



    As they showed. Seattle was the exception not the rule. This is what has confused you guys and got you all "jacked up on mountain dew". They note earlier that seattle will not have the luxury to over spend on a bunch of average players after next season...like they did the last 2 years.

    It is ok to be wrong, as long as you can learn from your mistakes. The majority of succesful teams in this league are built one way...through their own core, not " making a splash" or "going for it".

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    The only thing that counts is that talent you have on the team.  It's no doubt best if you can get that talent through the draft and fill your team with young, good, inexpensive players. 

    But you need the talent.  If you're not getting enough of it through the draft, you've got to get it through free agency.  You only have two choices: draft and free agency.  If one ain't working, you better have success in the other.  If both ain't working, you're playing Sterling Moore in the Super Bowl. 

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from tanbass. Show tanbass's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to seattlepat70's comment:

    Do you think other coaches or GMs think he makes the wrong moves a lot?



    No, that only happens here on this forum......with Babe leading the parade.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    One other thing, I agree with the article's premise that free agency is best to augment your team, assuming you have a strong core of signed players and good players on rookie contracts.  But you do need to augment the team. San Francisco and the Patriots both needed augmentation at the receiver position.  San Francisco did that well when they traded for Boldin, a big accomplished receiver who had proven playmaking ability. The Pats, meanwhile, went with an oft-injured Amendola who had had only one decent NFL season and really wasn't the big receiver the Pats desperately needed.  In fact, Amendola was only needed because the Pats failed to work something out with Welker, so Amendola wasn't really a step up, but rather a lateral move, filling a hole left by a lost player. 

    People will make all sorts of excuses, but since Moss left, Belichick has tried to fill the outside receiver position with late round draft picks and lower cost free agents, none of whom has worked out.  And now with Welker gone, he tried to fill the slot position with another guy whose quality and durability wasn't proven.  This isn't augmenting your team.  It's just filling roster slots with JAGs.

     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from agcsbill. Show agcsbill's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to BabeParilli's comment:

    In response to kjfitone's comment:

    In response to seattlepat70's comment:

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:

     

    Once Brady is gone, BB is toast.



    Replace Brady's name with Manning, Brees, Rodgers.  BB's initials with their respective team's HC initials and this statement applies to any NFL team who has an elite QB at the helm. IT is oft said, so goes your QB, so goes your team.

    BB survived without Brady in 2008, so, what does that do to your statement? Look what happened to the Colts without Manning ONE year!  BB, more than most NFL HCs can probably survive better because he is the best coach.  Not saying it would be easy, but, he knows how to build a TEAM.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    Great article True, couple things to note:

    As pro pointed out teams use FA to augment their teams filling holes that the draft has not. Well how many years in the draft did we search for CB's and WR's? And how long have SS, DT, and depth at certain positions been an issue year in and year out? Augmenting means the positions you couldn't find in the draft you need to go out and get via FA. Would you say the Pats have been adepth at getting those players?

    The article also points out that 10 of the top 5 paid players for playoff teams were FA's. Now I can tell you the Pats don't have any so what's the bigger outliar, the Pats having none in the top 5 or pretty much every playoff team having at least 1 FA as a top 5 paid guy. In otherwords almost every playoff team has had to augment their team with 1 higher priced FA. I'd be curious what the top 10 players from each team looks like.

    I find it odd you think we want shopping sprees when it's not true at all. Actually the one who wants the highest paid FA (or so to be) is in fact True with Revis. The rest of us want 1 or 2 players that get paid starting caliber funds but aren't top 5 paid at their positions.

    Here's some interesting other things True forgot to highlight:

    One that stands out is signing someone else's No. 2 receiver to be your No. 1. That's where the biggest mistakes are; those almost always fail," one NFC club executive said. 

    as in Amendola

    Part of the evaluation is, again, figuring out who a guy is and why he's free, whether it's because of financial reasons or something rooted in performance or character.


    As in don't sign red flag players ie Lloyd, Haynesworth, A. Wilson, Amendola

    "You're probably gonna overpay somewhere, and if you overpay for Peyton Manning or DeMarcus Wareor Richard Sherman, the elite players, that's OK," the AFC personnel exec said. "Where you really get in trouble is when you overpay for Paul Kruger. You set yourself back, because now that guy is making $8 million a year, and he's probably a $4 million-a-year player. ... You have to be strong with your evaluation of the player and avoid getting caught up in need."

    As in pay for talent don't overpay for someone who isn't, ie see Arrington and Amendola

    It's funny you highlight "But even with regard to those teams , the situation will correct itself when guys like Sherman , Earl Thomas , Russell Wilson , Demaryius Thomas , Julius Thomas and Von Miller get paid . In fact , the very reason those teams could be so aggressive with  other clubs ' players was because they had a solid core in place , with players still playing on rookie deals"


    Are you trying to say the Pats don't have a solid core and don't have good players with rook deals as to why they can't be aggressive? Because if you think the Pats have a solid core and have good rooks then according to this article you posted there is no reason they can't be aggressive.

     

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    I dont agree that without TB, BB will be toast

    I do understand the philosophy of "the cook needs to shop for the groceries", and I do agree with this philosophy

    I 100% want BB as the coach, and understand that if he is to coach here, he must have 100% control

    If the Pats over the past decade performed as the Red Sox had, 3 WS but also a last place finish which changed the way management does business, would that philosophy work for BB, and if he did not make the playoffs this year, would he change his philosophy?

    Would the PAts fan base, like the RS fan base, accept a non playoff year in order to win SB's in the next decade?

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from rtuinila. Show rtuinila's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    One other thing, I agree with the article's premise that free agency is best to augment your team, assuming you have a strong core of signed players and good players on rookie contracts.  But you do need to augment the team. San Francisco and the Patriots both needed augmentation at the receiver position.  San Francisco did that well when they traded for Boldin, a big accomplished receiver who had proven playmaking ability. The Pats, meanwhile, went with an oft-injured Amendola who had had only one decent NFL season and really wasn't the big receiver the Pats desperately needed.  In fact, Amendola was only needed because the Pats failed to work something out with Welker, so Amendola wasn't really a step up, but rather a lateral move, filling a hole left by a lost player. 

    People will make all sorts of excuses, but since Moss left, Belichick has tried to fill the outside receiver position with late round draft picks and lower cost free agents, none of whom has worked out.  And now with Welker gone, he tried to fill the slot position with another guy whose quality and durability wasn't proven.  This isn't augmenting your team.  It's just filling roster slots with JAGs.

     




    If you continue to AUGMENT the WR position, how are your rookies ever going to develope? They won't.

    How many superbowls have the Pats won with a true #1 receiver? 0. Not one superbowl out of three.

    Do you think BB knows that? Yes. Does this prove that you don't need a true, splashy, #1 wide receiver to win? Yes.

    How many superbowls have the Pats won with just JAGs? 3. All of them were won with just JAGs.

    BB's job is to make players into household names, not buy them.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from teegee. Show teegee's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!


    Terrific article; thanks for the post.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to rtuinila's comment:

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    One other thing, I agree with the article's premise that free agency is best to augment your team, assuming you have a strong core of signed players and good players on rookie contracts.  But you do need to augment the team. San Francisco and the Patriots both needed augmentation at the receiver position.  San Francisco did that well when they traded for Boldin, a big accomplished receiver who had proven playmaking ability. The Pats, meanwhile, went with an oft-injured Amendola who had had only one decent NFL season and really wasn't the big receiver the Pats desperately needed.  In fact, Amendola was only needed because the Pats failed to work something out with Welker, so Amendola wasn't really a step up, but rather a lateral move, filling a hole left by a lost player. 

    People will make all sorts of excuses, but since Moss left, Belichick has tried to fill the outside receiver position with late round draft picks and lower cost free agents, none of whom has worked out.  And now with Welker gone, he tried to fill the slot position with another guy whose quality and durability wasn't proven.  This isn't augmenting your team.  It's just filling roster slots with JAGs.

     

     




    If you continue to AUGMENT the WR position, how are your rookies ever going to develope? They won't.

     

    How many superbowls have the Pats won with a true #1 receiver? 0. Not one superbowl out of three.

    Do you think BB knows that? Yes. Does this prove that you don't need a true, splashy, #1 wide receiver to win? Yes.

    How many superbowls have the Pats won with just JAGs? 3. All of them were won with just JAGs.

    BB's job is to make players into household names, not buy them.



    You mean Taylor Price?  Sure developing rookies is great . . . if you have any.  Going into a season with just untested rookies because you haven't developed any young talent before losing your old talent, though, leaves you pretty vulnerable--particularly when you're a passing team.

    And actually Deon Branch and Troy Brown and David Givens were pretty effective receivers back then.  Branch was Super Bowl MVP.  

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from DanishPastry. Show DanishPastry's posts

    Re: A brilliant article explaining why BB builds the way he does. prolate must read!

    In response to rkarp's comment:

    I dont agree that without TB, BB will be toast

    I do understand the philosophy of "the cook needs to shop for the groceries", and I do agree with this philosophy

    I 100% want BB as the coach, and understand that if he is to coach here, he must have 100% control

    If the Pats over the past decade performed as the Red Sox had, 3 WS but also a last place finish which changed the way management does business, would that philosophy work for BB, and if he did not make the playoffs this year, would he change his philosophy?

    Would the PAts fan base, like the RS fan base, accept a non playoff year in order to win SB's in the next decade?



    Sure, if it were a sure thing, win this year, miss the playoffs the year after or vice versa, I'd take it. But it doesn't work that way.

    Once you get to the conference championship games, there are only the elite teams left, and at that point it's a question of 1) being healthy, 2) gameplanning, 3) homefield-advantage, 3) the referees, 4) good old luck.

    The all-in approach may or may not get you the results, but I don't see evidence that the SB-winners of the last decade have gone that road. Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Green Bay, Giants, and now the Seahawks. I readilly admit my ignorance to the details of their teambuilding, but my general take on them is that they try to build for sustained succes. With varying degrees of succes.

    The Patriots do the same, and have had great succes, only they haven't gotten the job done in the SB. Frustrating. Absolutely. Reason to change philosophy. Absolutely not.

     

     

     
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