Belchick Coaching Tree

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsChowder. Show PatsChowder's posts

    Belchick Coaching Tree

    I saw an article on Yahoo about this and it got me thinking. Why are none of the coaches from the Belichick tree successful?

    I honestly have to think it's because they don't know how to go about earning the respect that Belichick did.  They worked with him when he had already earned his clout in New England. Now, you see Mangini and McDaniels both popping off with big time controversies against some of their respective franchise's best players (Cutler and Cribbs).

    If they would just shut up and prove they can win while they stay quiet they could earn the opportunity to make all of the brash moves that BB can.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from JohnHannahrulz. Show JohnHannahrulz's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    I'd hate to sound like a mafia don, but part of it is respect. Belichick has been coaching for a very long time and won Super Bowls with and without the PAts (see Giants as LB coach etc....) With some on the BB coaching tree they try and make power moves (trading Cutler, signing Favre) to bolster their own egos. If someone that has garnered widespread respect throughout the NFL (Parcells Belichick) pulls the same moves he gets greater latitude and a longer leash from the owners/employers. Mangini and Mc Daniels have limited success and thus are not as respected as Parcells or Belichick. Mangini and Mc Daniels are like 15 win  game winning pitchers that could only win when part of a great team and the jury is still out on both of them. Limited sample; see where these coaches are in five years and then discuss the success or lack thereof the Belichick coaching tree.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsChowder. Show PatsChowder's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    I don't disagree with you that it is still way too early to judge the coaches as a whole, but I think that if we looked at the way Belichick coached as a new coach in New England you would see a very different style coach than you see today. One who conformed to fit the system a little bit more. Once he had established himself, and the Lombardi Trophy never hurt, he shifted significantly into the coach we see today.

    Not that it wasn't in him to begin with, but he made it work with what he had to start.

    Neither of the coaches that I discussed are taking this job on like the early coach Belichick, but they both took on the responsibilities as the current one.  I think that's why we have seen little early success (though McDaniel can change that if he wins in season one with Denver).
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from KyleCleric2. Show KyleCleric2's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    It's the ownership timetable and having to deal with some pathetic GMs. Crennell and Mangini did a good job coaching the team, but they had impatient ownerships that didn't give them the time to put the system together and two huge ego GMs Savage and Tannenbaum.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from prairiemike. Show prairiemike's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    Don't forget that Belichick paid his dues struggling in Cleveland, where nobody was confusing him with any kind of genius. When the correct set of circumstances presented themselves in New England, and Tom Brady magically appeared as if out of nowhere, Belichick proved to have the ability to initially create a winning team that was greater than the sum of its parts and, as the years have gone by, maintain a standard of excellence that is unmatched in the NFL in this century (with a passing nod in the direction of Bitchburgh). Mangini and McDaniels, conversely, are like the proverbial child born with a silver spoon in his mouth. All they knew in New England was winning -- and learning how to do things under Belichick, whose authority is never questioned, has probably given them an inflated sense of entitlement. As has been said, the jury is still out and only time will tell how these guys mature as coaches (if, in fact, they ever do). Mangini failed impressively with Green New Jersey and was awarded the Browns job for his efforts. McDaniels opened his career in Denver with his foot in his mouth via the Cutler debacle and then wedged the other one in there with it during the draft, but I'm sure he's got a plan and, if he gets the time to implement it, maybe he will have the last laugh up there in the mountains.

    My take is that both of these guys (and Weiss and Crennel before them) saw their greatest success as part of a unit masterminded by the true master, and while they may be adequate coaches in their own right, none of them will ever duplicate anything like the success they had as part of one of the greatest dynasties in NFL history.

    Either that, or I am entirely wrong.

    Cool
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JohnHannahrulz. Show JohnHannahrulz's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    Nice post Prairie Mike. Let's not forget BB was with the SB Giants as LB coach. You have to have good ownership and good management to succeed. Sorry for the Dale Carnegie quote.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Trox1. Show Trox1's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    It's the ownership timetable and having to deal with some pathetic GMs. Crennell and Mangini did a good job coaching the team, but they had impatient ownerships that didn't give them the time to put the system together and two huge ego GMs Savage and Tannenbaum.
    Posted by KyleCleric2


    I'm surprised to see you say Romeo did a good job in Cleveland.  You're generally one of the best and most knowledgeable posters on this site.  I strongly disagree with you here though.  Romeo was horrible in Cleveland.  His clock management and use of timeouts was pathetic.  He was way to conservative as well.  I think it was against Pitt last year where he elected to kick a FG with 4 minutes left down 21.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonBobBlowhard. Show BostonBobBlowhard's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    I saw an article on Yahoo about this and it got me thinking. Why are none of the coaches from the Belichick tree successful? I honestly have to think it's because they don't know how to go about earning the respect that Belichick did.  They worked with him when he had already earned his clout in New England. Now, you see Mangini and McDaniels both popping off with big time controversies against some of their respective franchise's best players (Cutler and Cribbs). If they would just shut up and prove they can win while they stay quiet they could earn the opportunity to make all of the brash moves that BB can.
    Posted by PatsChowder


    Mangini is a joke. Why Cleveland immediately hired him is incredible...remember when the JESTS ran out and hired Rich Kotite after he lost his last seven games in Philly and was bounced? The guy ended up 1-15, 1-22 for his last 23 NFL coaching games. This is a good record for Mangini to shoot for.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from KyleCleric2. Show KyleCleric2's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    I'm surprised to see you say Romeo did a good job in Cleveland.  You're generally one of the best and most knowledgeable posters on this site.  I strongly disagree with you here though.  Romeo was horrible in Cleveland.  His clock management and use of timeouts was pathetic.  He was way to conservative as well.  I think it was against Pitt last year where he elected to kick a FG with 4 minutes left down 21.
    Posted by Trox1


    Well, it was just my opinion of Romeo. He had far too much going against him with the team he inherited and the choices and arrogance of his GM and the pressures of the ownership and fans to succeed right away. Under the circumstances, he was able to pull off a 10 win season. When it comes to rating coaches, I generally leave clock management, use of timeouts, philosophy, and game decision judgements to the playoffs. Coaches should have different goals in the regular season.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from patpscyho. Show patpscyho's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    With some on the BB coaching tree they try and make power moves (trading Cutler, signing Favre) to bolster their own egos. 
    Posted by JohnHannahrulz


    Mangini did not sign Favre.. that was all Woody and a little Tannebaum. Woody wanted to fill the seats, especially the PSL's.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonBobBlowhard. Show BostonBobBlowhard's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    I'm surprised to see you say Romeo did a good job in Cleveland.  You're generally one of the best and most knowledgeable posters on this site.  I strongly disagree with you here though.  Romeo was horrible in Cleveland.  His clock management and use of timeouts was pathetic.  He was way to conservative as well.  I think it was against Pitt last year where he elected to kick a FG with 4 minutes left down 21.
    Posted by Trox1


    Romeo Crennel and Eric Mangini are two of the biggest bozos ever to head coach in the NFL. Cleveland was supposed to be a major contender last year. Not. GM Tannenbaum has done a great job taking the good players left from Herm Edwards and adding more. Mangini has no excuses.  They had what, 9 Pro Bowlers last year? Typically, Mangini punts on 4th and 1 from the other team's 40, and goes for it on 4th and 6 from his own 35. He is truly an idiot, and has some sense that players are supposed to fear and respect him as they do BB. Not. Watch him dismantle Cleveland and derail any comeback hopes they have.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Kmaxx. Show Kmaxx's posts

    Re: Belchick Coaching Tree

    I don't understand the conventional wisdom that just because you coached under a great Head coach that will somehow make you a great Head coach.

    Unless you share the same DNA the two have nothing to do with each other.
     
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