Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

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    Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    I don't think anyone linked to this articler from Bruschi, which had some pretty substantive analysis.  The part that caught my eye:

    1. Introducing the "pressure" Patriots. The Patriots started the game dialing up pressure calls and never looked back. They sent everything but the kitchen sink. Coach Bill Belichick sent the "Mike" linebacker (middle linebacker), the "Will" linebacker (weakside), the "Sam" linebacker (strongside), and even the corners got in on the action. These pressures were called with mostly man coverage concepts behind them.

    When you do this, you find out a few things about your personnel during the game. First, who can get to the passer when his number is called? Second, who can cover man-to-man when there might be just a single high safety or maybe no safety at all?

    There is also a read-blitzing element to it.

    Read-blitzing is when you have linebackers who have coverage responsibilities on either a tight end or running back. They read the pass-protection responsibilities and the free man enters the rush. So when you look at it as it's happening, it can look like a max blitz at times. But it's really man coverage with linebackers reading coverage responsibilities. That's commonly referred to as a "book" technique.

    Another aspect that stood out was the presence of Andre Carter at defensive end. The Patriots didn't need to call for pressure because of the huge game he had. It was an important showing for him, proving that he can set the edge in the running game and give an offensive tackle fits with a one-on-one rush. He did all that, forcing holding penalties against left tackle Donald Penn, at one point spinning him like a top in pass protection; Carter turned Penn around, and Penn tried to block with his behind. This is important for the entire defense. A presence like that will only make the interior defensive linemen better -- Albert Haynesworth, Vince Wilfork, Mike Wright, Gerard Warren, Myron Pryor and Co. If there is no presence at the defensive end spot, offensive lines will be able to pinch down and use protection schemes that can neutralize the interior linemen. With that type of production from Andre Carter at defensive end, this defense could be very successful.

    Based on what we've seen in the first two preseason games, the old 3-4 days seem to be less of a priority. The best example was when Warren used a quick swim move for a tackle, with Pryor spinning and getting in on the tackle on the same play. That's not something you'd see in the base 3-4 system. When you think of the base 3-4, the idea would be to get your hands in the middle of the blocker, stand your guy up, make the read, shed and make the tackle. Now the Patriots are coming off the ball, doing anything to disregard blockers, and it was never more evident than on that play. While it's different, you're also seeing how the players are embracing it, finding their own way of interpreting what the coaches are looking for when it comes to getting in the backfield.

    Later, Brischu says:

    4. No longer a big philosophical shift between base and sub. Watching a game like that, you could see everything going according to plan for the Patriots. The idea is that the 4-3 defense creates negative plays early that result in a couple of three-and-outs, and the offense puts together a couple of early scoring drives; then the opposing team feels it has to play catch up and pass the ball to score points.

    With the resounding victory, and how everything was working in the first half, you can see the logic behind the defensive shift.

    One of the things that stands out to me with the new 4-3 defense is that you don't have such a big philosophical shift between your base defense and subpackages, where you're trying to generate pressure with a four-man front. When the 3-4 was the Patriots' base defense, it's a two-gapping scheme that didn't produce many negative plays. When offenses brought out regular personnel, as a defender in the 3-4 you're thinking, "I have to be stout, physical and two-gap." Then, when the offense brings out more receivers, you're shifting to more of a penetrating player.

    Now, with a shift to a 4-3, it's the same mentality for the players in the front seven regardless of whether you're in the base or subpackages. You don't have two different concepts to worry about during the game.




    Read the whole article here:http://espn.go.com/boston/nfl/story/_/id/6877638/bruschi-tap-new-england-patriots-embracing-new-defensive-scheme

    So there's been a clear and very fundamental shift (so far) in what we are seeing from the NE Patriots on defense.  We've gotten rid of players that fit one defensive approach, added new ones who fit a new approach, and at least so far in the preseason, we've seen our front seven playing in a new alignment using techniques that sense given this new way. I certainly hope this means increased defensive producion: third down stops, QB pressure, turn-overs, and most importantly low scores for other teams andWs for us. 

    I'm immensely heartened though, by this.  Our coach never stops evaluating, analyzing, and seeking ways to improve the team, and that includes changing how he does things.  It's so difficult for institutions and individuals within them to change, especially after past success.  His willingness to self-scout and change is remarkable.  I can just imagine him and Ernie Adams sitting around, looking at the defensive success teams like Jets and Ravens have had, looking at thier own team/players, and making a bold call to change it up.

    He's just the best at what he does.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Nice post! I think someone did post a link or qoute it some where on here. I agree with your comments. Hopefully this D will be a beast this year.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"



    In Response to Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]I don't think anyone linked to this articler from Bruschi, which had some pretty substantive analysis.  The part that caught my eye: 1. Introducing the "pressure" Patriots. The Patriots started the game dialing up pressure calls and never looked back. They sent everything but the kitchen sink. Coach Bill Belichick sent the "Mike" linebacker (middle linebacker), the "Will" linebacker (weakside), the "Sam" linebacker (strongside), and even the corners got in on the action. These pressures were called with mostly man coverage concepts behind them. When you do this, you find out a few things about your personnel during the game. First, who can get to the passer when his number is called? Second, who can cover man-to-man when there might be just a single high safety or maybe no safety at all? There is also a read-blitzing element to it. Read-blitzing is when you have linebackers who have coverage responsibilities on either a tight end or running back. They read the pass-protection responsibilities and the free man enters the rush. So when you look at it as it's happening, it can look like a max blitz at times. But it's really man coverage with linebackers reading coverage responsibilities. That's commonly referred to as a "book" technique. Another aspect that stood out was the presence of Andre Carter at defensive end. The Patriots didn't need to call for pressure because of the huge game he had. It was an important showing for him, proving that he can set the edge in the running game and give an offensive tackle fits with a one-on-one rush. He did all that, forcing holding penalties against left tackle Donald Penn , at one point spinning him like a top in pass protection; Carter turned Penn around, and Penn tried to block with his behind. This is important for the entire defense. A presence like that will only make the interior defensive linemen better -- Albert Haynesworth , Vince Wilfork , Mike Wright , Gerard Warren , Myron Pryor and Co. If there is no presence at the defensive end spot, offensive lines will be able to pinch down and use protection schemes that can neutralize the interior linemen. With that type of production from Andre Carter at defensive end, this defense could be very successful. Based on what we've seen in the first two preseason games, the old 3-4 days seem to be less of a priority. The best example was when Warren used a quick swim move for a tackle, with Pryor spinning and getting in on the tackle on the same play. That's not something you'd see in the base 3-4 system. When you think of the base 3-4, the idea would be to get your hands in the middle of the blocker, stand your guy up, make the read, shed and make the tackle. Now the Patriots are coming off the ball, doing anything to disregard blockers, and it was never more evident than on that play. While it's different, you're also seeing how the players are embracing it, finding their own way of interpreting what the coaches are looking for when it comes to getting in the backfield. Later, Brischu says: 4. No longer a big philosophical shift between base and sub. Watching a game like that, you could see everything going according to plan for the Patriots. The idea is that the 4-3 defense creates negative plays early that result in a couple of three-and-outs, and the offense puts together a couple of early scoring drives; then the opposing team feels it has to play catch up and pass the ball to score points. With the resounding victory, and how everything was working in the first half, you can see the logic behind the defensive shift. One of the things that stands out to me with the new 4-3 defense is that you don't have such a big philosophical shift between your base defense and subpackages, where you're trying to generate pressure with a four-man front. When the 3-4 was the Patriots' base defense, it's a two-gapping scheme that didn't produce many negative plays. When offenses brought out regular personnel, as a defender in the 3-4 you're thinking, "I have to be stout, physical and two-gap." Then, when the offense brings out more receivers, you're shifting to more of a penetrating player. Now, with a shift to a 4-3, it's the same mentality for the players in the front seven regardless of whether you're in the base or subpackages. You don't have two different concepts to worry about during the game. Read the whole article here: http://espn.go.com/boston/nfl/story/_/id/6877638/bruschi-tap-new-england-patriots-embracing-new-defensive-scheme So there's been a clear and very fundamental shift (so far) in what we are seeing from the NE Patriots on defense.  We've gotten rid of players that fit one defensive approach, added new ones who fit a new approach, and at least so far in the preseason, we've seen our front seven playing in a new alignment using techniques that sense given this new way. I certainly hope this means increased defensive producion: third down stops, QB pressure, turn-overs, and most importantly low scores for other teams andWs for us.  I'm immensely heartened though, by this.  Our coach never stops evaluating, analyzing, and seeking ways to improve the team, and that includes changing how he does things.  It's so difficult for institutions and individuals within them to change, especially after past success.  His willingness to self-scout and change is remarkable.  I can just imagine him and Ernie Adams sitting around, looking at the defensive success teams like Jets and Ravens have had, looking at thier own team/players, and making a bold call to change it up. He's just the best at what he does.
    Posted by USMCM1A1[/QUOTE]

    as usual, good read Laughing
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Nice.  Tedy breaks it down well.  
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Excellent read, Carter is a beast.  Correct me if i'm wrong but ellis and carter both are DEs.  I'm interested to see how Ellis plays against the lions (assuming he plays)  it would be nice to have 2 beasts to play at the position. 

    Im also fascinated that BB went from the bend don't break defense designed to NOT give up the big play,  to a Def that is going to make great plays behind the LOS but also on occasion give up huge gains.  I'm interested to see how it works against elite qbs like Manning (Eli of course lol) that usually can release the ball b4 the blitz and also Big ben and Vick who can sidestep or break a tackle on a blitz.
     
    It will be a chess match to watch and I'm really excited to see it in action.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]Excellent read, Carter is a beast.  Correct me if i'm wrong but ellis and carter both are DEs.  I'm interested to see how Ellis plays against the lions (assuming he plays)  it would be nice to have 2 beasts to play at the position.  Im also fascinated that BB went from the bend don't break defense designed to NOT give up the big play,  to a Def that is going to make great plays behind the LOS but also on occasion give up huge gains.  I'm interested to see how it works against elite qbs like Manning (Eli of course lol) that usually can release the ball b4 the blitz and also Big ben and Vick who can sidestep or break a tackle on a blitz.   It will be a chess match to watch and I'm really excited to see it in action.
    Posted by Michael02127[/QUOTE]

    1. Carter is an end.  Ellis usually plays end, but has also lined up in NY as an interior sub-rusher.

    2. Matt Bowen had a piece in the NFP about the shift in Dallas to an attacking, disruptive defense, that I think could just as easily been written about the Patriots:

    "If you aren’t familiar with Ryan, think of what we see from the Ravens, Saints, Packers, Steelers and Jets. Top-tier units that live by pressure-based schemes. Much different than the style of football we might watch in Chicago or Indy. Tampa 2 teams that force the ball to go underneath, limiting the big play in zone based schemes.

    In Dallas, you are going to see a defense that attacks the line of scrimmage and protection schemes. Plus, coaching that will polish and improve the play of the secondary."

    We appear to be shifting from a read and react defense with a Cover 2 sheel over the front seven, to a pressure based scheme.

     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Carter and Ellis can both play "ends" but they are two different types of players with different styles.  Carter is more a speed guy and Ellis more a power guy.  That's why Ellis can be moved inside more than Carter and play like a 4-3 DT or stay outside and play more like a 3-4 end.  Carter is more a 4-3 style end or even a 4-3 OLB.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"


    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : 1. Carter is an end.  Ellis usually plays end, but has also lined up in NY as an interior sub-rusher. 2. Matt Bowen had a piece in the NFP about the shift in Dallas to an attacking, disruptive defense, that I think could just as easily been written about the Patriots: "If you aren’t familiar with Ryan, think of what we see from the Ravens, Saints, Packers, Steelers and Jets. Top-tier units that live by pressure-based schemes . Much different than the style of football we might watch in Chicago or Indy. Tampa 2 teams that force the ball to go underneath, limiting the big play in zone based schemes. In Dallas, you are going to see a defense that attacks the line of scrimmage and protection schemes. Plus, coaching that will polish and improve the play of the secondary." We appear to be shifting from a read and react defense with a Cover 2 sheel over the front seven, to a pressure based scheme.
    Posted by USMCM1A1[/QUOTE]

    Well, the 3-4 of the past focused more on gap control and covering - and less about applying pressure on the QB.

    BB blitzed quite a bit during the game vs. Bucs...just to see what would happen.

    What kind of a role do you see Haynesworth playing?
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : 1. Carter is an end.  Ellis usually plays end, but has also lined up in NY as an interior sub-rusher. 2. Matt Bowen had a piece in the NFP about the shift in Dallas to an attacking, disruptive defense, that I think could just as easily been written about the Patriots: "If you aren’t familiar with Ryan, think of what we see from the Ravens, Saints, Packers, Steelers and Jets. Top-tier units that live by pressure-based schemes . Much different than the style of football we might watch in Chicago or Indy. Tampa 2 teams that force the ball to go underneath, limiting the big play in zone based schemes. In Dallas, you are going to see a defense that attacks the line of scrimmage and protection schemes. Plus, coaching that will polish and improve the play of the secondary." We appear to be shifting from a read and react defense with a Cover 2 sheel over the front seven, to a pressure based scheme.
    Posted by USMCM1A1[/QUOTE]

    I got it.  I think it's going to be much more exciting from a pure entertainment view and hopefully allow us to get of the field on 3rd down with  much higher efficency.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Coach has learned that "Bend Don't Break" doesn't/hasn't worked. 

    Thank God....now bring the Pressure boys.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Football is football, you still have to tackle someone and score points, but man I would think most would prefer to play in a system like this over what we usually play. If you're a defensive lineman, why would you want to just hold up the guy in front of you and let linebackers make plays or fight off a block and throw your body into a lane? Could you imagine how much it sucks to be a nose tackle? Talk about the pain and rick involved with taking on a guard and center. The thing is, the system worked...when we had the players. It took some big time playoff loses, by some bad QB's to understand we didn't have the horses...wish we had done it sooner.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]Our coach never stops evaluating, analyzing, and seeking ways to improve the team, and that includes changing how he does things.  It's so difficult for institutions and individuals within them to change, especially after past success.  His willingness to self-scout and change is remarkable.  I can just imagine him and Ernie Adams sitting around, looking at the defensive success teams like Jets and Ravens have had, looking at thier own team/players, and making a bold call to change it up. He's just the best at what he does.
    Posted by USMCM1A1[/QUOTE]

    I think it largely has to do with BB adjusting to the evolution of the league. Used to be only a handful of 3-4 teams, so the Pats could cherry pick from the best DE/OLB talent for the scheme, and most opponents' offenses had little practice against the various 3-4 schemes. Now, there are a significant number of teams running some flavor of 3-4, so the talent pool is diminished and a glut of 4-3 lineman have become available.

    I actually think having a bend-but-don't-break defense is a worthwhile strategy for a team with an anemic offense that has trouble putting points on the board; keep 'em off the field, and don't let 'em commit turnovers. But with our offense, we can afford to be much more aggressive, much more risky--even if it results in more big plays by the opponent's offense--because no one in the league can put up points like the Pats offense. If the Pats D can move up into the top-12 or better on 3rd down efficiency, this is going to be one scary team.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : Well, the 3-4 of the past focused more on gap control and covering - and less about applying pressure on the QB. BB blitzed quite a bit during the game vs. Bucs...just to see what would happen. What kind of a role do you see Haynesworth playing?
    Posted by BubbaInHawaii[/QUOTE]

    Haynesworth is going to play the "Seymour" role, so three, four and five tech. I also wouldn't be surprisd to see him set up at seven based on how BB played around with an "inside out" defensive line last season, possibly shifting lighter DEs inside.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : Haynesworth is going to play the "Seymour" role, so three, four and five tech. I also wouldn't be surprisd to see him set up at seven based on how BB played around with an "inside out" defensive line last season, possibly shifting lighter DEs inside.
    Posted by zbellino[/QUOTE]

    You think Haynesworth is going to be playing a Seymore type of spot? I can't see him playing right defensive end in a 34 defense. At tackle in a 43? Yeah. I just don't think he'd want to tie up blockers and I'm not sure I see this guy coming around the edge, like Seymore used to do on occasion with that burst and wingspan. 
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Translation: The Pats will f*ck some people up....Peyton! Tongue out
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]I don't think anyone linked to this articler from Bruschi, which had some pretty substantive analysis.  The part that caught my eye: 1. Introducing the "pressure" Patriots. The Patriots started the game dialing up pressure calls and never looked back. They sent everything but the kitchen sink. Coach Bill Belichick sent the "Mike" linebacker (middle linebacker), the "Will" linebacker (weakside), the "Sam" linebacker (strongside), and even the corners got in on the action. These pressures were called with mostly man coverage concepts behind them. When you do this, you find out a few things about your personnel during the game. First, who can get to the passer when his number is called? Second, who can cover man-to-man when there might be just a single high safety or maybe no safety at all? There is also a read-blitzing element to it. Read-blitzing is when you have linebackers who have coverage responsibilities on either a tight end or running back. They read the pass-protection responsibilities and the free man enters the rush. So when you look at it as it's happening, it can look like a max blitz at times. But it's really man coverage with linebackers reading coverage responsibilities. That's commonly referred to as a "book" technique. Another aspect that stood out was the presence of Andre Carter at defensive end. The Patriots didn't need to call for pressure because of the huge game he had. It was an important showing for him, proving that he can set the edge in the running game and give an offensive tackle fits with a one-on-one rush. He did all that, forcing holding penalties against left tackle Donald Penn , at one point spinning him like a top in pass protection; Carter turned Penn around, and Penn tried to block with his behind. This is important for the entire defense. A presence like that will only make the interior defensive linemen better -- Albert Haynesworth , Vince Wilfork , Mike Wright , Gerard Warren , Myron Pryor and Co. If there is no presence at the defensive end spot, offensive lines will be able to pinch down and use protection schemes that can neutralize the interior linemen. With that type of production from Andre Carter at defensive end, this defense could be very successful. Based on what we've seen in the first two preseason games, the old 3-4 days seem to be less of a priority. The best example was when Warren used a quick swim move for a tackle, with Pryor spinning and getting in on the tackle on the same play. That's not something you'd see in the base 3-4 system. When you think of the base 3-4, the idea would be to get your hands in the middle of the blocker, stand your guy up, make the read, shed and make the tackle. Now the Patriots are coming off the ball, doing anything to disregard blockers, and it was never more evident than on that play. While it's different, you're also seeing how the players are embracing it, finding their own way of interpreting what the coaches are looking for when it comes to getting in the backfield. Later, Brischu says: 4. No longer a big philosophical shift between base and sub. Watching a game like that, you could see everything going according to plan for the Patriots. The idea is that the 4-3 defense creates negative plays early that result in a couple of three-and-outs, and the offense puts together a couple of early scoring drives; then the opposing team feels it has to play catch up and pass the ball to score points. With the resounding victory, and how everything was working in the first half, you can see the logic behind the defensive shift. One of the things that stands out to me with the new 4-3 defense is that you don't have such a big philosophical shift between your base defense and subpackages, where you're trying to generate pressure with a four-man front. When the 3-4 was the Patriots' base defense, it's a two-gapping scheme that didn't produce many negative plays. When offenses brought out regular personnel, as a defender in the 3-4 you're thinking, "I have to be stout, physical and two-gap." Then, when the offense brings out more receivers, you're shifting to more of a penetrating player. Now, with a shift to a 4-3, it's the same mentality for the players in the front seven regardless of whether you're in the base or subpackages. You don't have two different concepts to worry about during the game. Read the whole article here: http://espn.go.com/boston/nfl/story/_/id/6877638/bruschi-tap-new-england-patriots-embracing-new-defensive-scheme So there's been a clear and very fundamental shift (so far) in what we are seeing from the NE Patriots on defense.  We've gotten rid of players that fit one defensive approach, added new ones who fit a new approach, and at least so far in the preseason, we've seen our front seven playing in a new alignment using techniques that sense given this new way. I certainly hope this means increased defensive producion: third down stops, QB pressure, turn-overs, and most importantly low scores for other teams andWs for us.  I'm immensely heartened though, by this.  Our coach never stops evaluating, analyzing, and seeking ways to improve the team, and that includes changing how he does things.  It's so difficult for institutions and individuals within them to change, especially after past success.  His willingness to self-scout and change is remarkable.  I can just imagine him and Ernie Adams sitting around, looking at the defensive success teams like Jets and Ravens have had, looking at thier own team/players, and making a bold call to change it up. He's just the best at what he does.
    Posted by USMCM1A1[/QUOTE]

    i commented on these cahnges last week and referred to 2 years begging for this. pass defense/pass rush being the only thing keeping us from more esuper bowl titles, particularly with brady getting up ther in years and that we need to go for 2 in next 3 years.  bb looks liek hes all in.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]Excellent read, Carter is a beast.  Correct me if i'm wrong but ellis and carter both are DEs.  I'm interested to see how Ellis plays against the lions (assuming he plays)  it would be nice to have 2 beasts to play at the position.  Im also fascinated that BB went from the bend don't break defense designed to NOT give up the big play,  to a Def that is going to make great plays behind the LOS but also on occasion give up huge gains.  I'm interested to see how it works against elite qbs like Manning (Eli of course lol) that usually can release the ball b4 the blitz and also Big ben and Vick who can sidestep or break a tackle on a blitz.   It will be a chess match to watch and I'm really excited to see it in action.
    Posted by Michael02127[/QUOTE]


    with albert and vince on th efield it will be 4 beasts.
    if ras i steps up, we may have enough in the secondary to do ok and not be weak there. if we have enough top guys healthy it looks like fun finally going  into the playoffs (instead of fear about our de)
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]Football is football, you still have to tackle someone and score points, but man I would think most would prefer to play in a system like this over what we usually play. If you're a defensive lineman, why would you want to just hold up the guy in front of you and let linebackers make plays or fight off a block and throw your body into a lane? Could you imagine how much it sucks to be a nose tackle? Talk about the pain and rick involved with taking on a guard and center. The thing is, the system worked...when we had the players. It took some big time playoff loses, by some bad QB's to understand we didn't have the horses...wish we had done it sooner.
    Posted by mthurl[/QUOTE]

    exactly!
    and guys seem to be buoyed whit this really excited and getting a lot of energy up.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : Haynesworth is going to play the "Seymour" role, so three, four and five tech. I also wouldn't be surprisd to see him set up at seven based on how BB played around with an "inside out" defensive line last season, possibly shifting lighter DEs inside.
    Posted by zbellino[/QUOTE]


    z,
     how goes it? started a thread looking for you and seattle pat.
    great to see you posting! been looking for your thoughts and also responses to some stuff i posted over past several days.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    Maybe that was just one pre-season game and BB will continue to use a different defense (and offense) each game depending on the opponent?
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : I think this depends. It worked to the tune of 3 SBs, almost 4, and many wins, so you can't say it doesn't work. It works great with a veteran defense, one that is instictual and works well as a whole. The problem has been experience and continuity in recent years. BB saw cheap 4-3 veterans on the market, so he's making a switch to use more 4-3 and attack, but it's also nice to have the trusty 3-4 with players who at least can execute pretty well in it. I am sure we'll see the 3-4 as well this year. Depends on matchups and the team they are playing.
    Posted by RidingWithTheKing[/QUOTE]

    I'd go one step further and say that it's not a "bend but don't break" defense if you've got the players who can execute it to near-perfection. In 2003 the Pats allowed fewer than 15 PPG and the defense rarely got pushed around or gave up a ton of yards--even though early in the season they had lost a lot of key guys, like Colvin, to injury. I mean, when McGinest, Vrabel, Jarvis Green and Seymour were in their primes, as they were in '03, opposing QBs didn't have all that much time to scan the field on third down; and, even if they did, that secondary, with Law, Harrison, Wilson and Poole, made plays.

    The "bend but don't break" thing became the term to describe what the Pats' defense was doing after a lot of those guys got older and less productive. At that point, giving up yards but not points did become the main philosophy on defense, especially after BB decided to allow McDaniels to change to a more wide-open and higher-scoring offensive approach in the years after Weis left.

    Clearly, in today's NFL, the "bend but don't break" thing is not going to be as effective a system, and so after seeing the evidence and surveying the landscape over the past couple of seasons, BB has once again adapted to the times and shifted gears.
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    We just dont have the back 7 to do bend but dont break any more.  We did once, but it's just not happening any more.  I am excited about the 4 fatboys of the apocalypse being unleashed.  
     
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    Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme"

    In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme":
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Bruschi: "Patriots Are Embracing New Scheme" : Haynesworth is going to play the "Seymour" role, so three, four and five tech. I also wouldn't be surprisd to see him set up at seven based on how BB played around with an "inside out" defensive line last season, possibly shifting lighter DEs inside.
    Posted by zbellino[/QUOTE]He definitely will not play the Seymour role. How ridiculous. Haynesworth will play the "3" Technique which is outside foot or shoulder of the Offensive Guard on the TE side or "5" Tech which is outside shoulder of Tackle on the other side.He will not be on the field when BB goes to a 3-4 Base alignment.
     

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