Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    ATJ, as I said I can't attribute our increases to Obamacare. I really don't know why they go up, the carriers don't tell us. We've gone to a higher deductible plan and adopted a supplemental plan to help our people with the deductible. That helped keep them down for a while, but they still went up and this year, way up.  Right now, we won't be directly impacted by the ACA because we're less than 50 FTEs, but we do expect to grow.  If we do, we may need to do it with part-timers, we'll see.

    I think everyone will be impacted ultimately one way or another, even if your business is not (for now) directly affected.



    Can't disagree with anything you said here.  What we have done is self-insure the dedcutible.  For most of our employees it's a big savings for us, for a couple of them we've written more than one check that gave me pause before I signed 'em.  We're looking at the numbers now since we're due for a rewewal in the coming months.  

    We're looking to grow as well but it'll be awhile before i'm approaching 50 FTE territory.

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from pcmIV. Show pcmIV's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to LessPhatRex's comment:


    Oooooh...... shorthand.  Because typing growth is so cumbersome.  And what was this dramatic slowing? 75%? 50%? 


    Through most of the 2000's health care costs increased somewhere between 6.2% and 9.7% a year.  The past few years have been in the 3.8% or 3.9% range.  That is a decrease in the rate of growth of anywhere between 38% and 60% depending on how you want to make the comparison.  So yeah that is fairly dramatic.  MORON.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    ATJ, as I said I can't attribute our increases to Obamacare. I really don't know why they go up, the carriers don't tell us. We've gone to a higher deductible plan and adopted a supplemental plan to help our people with the deductible. That helped keep them down for a while, but they still went up and this year, way up.  Right now, we won't be directly impacted by the ACA because we're less than 50 FTEs, but we do expect to grow.  If we do, we may need to do it with part-timers, we'll see.

    I think everyone will be impacted ultimately one way or another, even if your business is not (for now) directly affected.



    this is where contracted/3rd party hires helps a business...straight pay as you go help, no extraneous expenses...unfortunately its not business as we used to know it, but it is reality today.

    Disney recognizes it, and needs to make these unfortunate decisions to stay a healthy company. You have to feel for the 2-3%, but you have to make decisions for the 97-98%. 

     
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  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to ATJ's comment:

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    ATJ, as I said I can't attribute our increases to Obamacare. I really don't know why they go up, the carriers don't tell us. We've gone to a higher deductible plan and adopted a supplemental plan to help our people with the deductible. That helped keep them down for a while, but they still went up and this year, way up.  Right now, we won't be directly impacted by the ACA because we're less than 50 FTEs, but we do expect to grow.  If we do, we may need to do it with part-timers, we'll see.

    I think everyone will be impacted ultimately one way or another, even if your business is not (for now) directly affected.

     



    Can't disagree with anything you said here.  What we have done is self-insure the dedcutible.  For most of our employees it's a big savings for us, for a couple of them we've written more than one check that gave me pause before I signed 'em.  We're looking at the numbers now since we're due for a rewewal in the coming months.  

     

    We're looking to grow as well but it'll be awhile before i'm approaching 50 FTE territory.

     



    That's essentially what we did with the deductible, adopted something called a MERP where the employee pays the first portion and then we cover a much larger part and then they pay the remainder, if it gets to that (which it rarely does). The exposure is a little scary, but our experience has been pretty good cost-wise.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     


    Muzzy, how many full time employees do you employ?

     

    Healthcare costs were the main reason I sold my company..and that was a number of years ago. I know it is much, much worse today.

     




     

    We're at 35. Down from a high of 120, but up from a low of 17 (about a year or so ago). Health costs keep rising, we've tried every trick we can to manage them. Premiums seem to go up 10% or so most years, this year about 30%.

     




    What business is it? I didn't see where you shared that.   Also, that's quite a shift from 17 to 120 now to 35.

     

     



    We're in financial services, we have a call center in FL and a smaller one in NJ. Almost everything we do is heavily regulated. Our industry was almost closed down by the feds, because of abuse by some d-bags.  But we did what we had to and now we're on the way back. Took a while, not 100% sure it was worth the aggravation but we're still here.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    ATJ, as I said I can't attribute our increases to Obamacare. I really don't know why they go up, the carriers don't tell us. We've gone to a higher deductible plan and adopted a supplemental plan to help our people with the deductible. That helped keep them down for a while, but they still went up and this year, way up.  Right now, we won't be directly impacted by the ACA because we're less than 50 FTEs, but we do expect to grow.  If we do, we may need to do it with part-timers, we'll see.

    I think everyone will be impacted ultimately one way or another, even if your business is not (for now) directly affected.

     



    this is where contracted/3rd party hires helps a business...straight pay as you go help, no extraneous expenses...unfortunately its not business as we used to know it, but it is reality today.

     

    Disney recognizes it, and needs to make these unfortunate decisions to stay a healthy company. You have to feel for the 2-3%, but you have to make decisions for the 97-98%. 

     




    Dude, it's called greed.  It's not like they;re hemorraging for cash or anything.  They're just being lazy.

     

    Of course having 1099 contractors, maybe even paying more per hour than you would for salary to avoid healthcare overhead is a better move cost-wise, but you act like ESPN is offering every person laid off a contractor role and it's not the case.

     



    Of course that is not the case. But 50% of the people will be offered re-lo jobs or contracting jobs. Cold hearted, but reality today.

    Its funny, I dont see any blame heaped on the NFL or MLB for the fees they are rcving from ESPN or FOX...every team is rolling in cash...yet blame is only aimed at ESPN

     
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  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    ATJ, as I said I can't attribute our increases to Obamacare. I really don't know why they go up, the carriers don't tell us. We've gone to a higher deductible plan and adopted a supplemental plan to help our people with the deductible. That helped keep them down for a while, but they still went up and this year, way up.  Right now, we won't be directly impacted by the ACA because we're less than 50 FTEs, but we do expect to grow.  If we do, we may need to do it with part-timers, we'll see.

    I think everyone will be impacted ultimately one way or another, even if your business is not (for now) directly affected.

     



    this is where contracted/3rd party hires helps a business...straight pay as you go help, no extraneous expenses...unfortunately its not business as we used to know it, but it is reality today.

     

    Disney recognizes it, and needs to make these unfortunate decisions to stay a healthy company. You have to feel for the 2-3%, but you have to make decisions for the 97-98%. 

     




    Dude, it's called greed.  It's not like they;re hemorraging for cash or anything.  They're just being lazy.

     

    Of course having 1099 contractors, maybe even paying more per hour than you would for salary to avoid healthcare overhead is a better move cost-wise, but you act like ESPN is offering every person laid off a contractor role and it's not the case.

     

     



    Of course that is not the case. But 50% of the people will be offered re-lo jobs or contracting jobs. Cold hearted, but reality today.

     

    Its funny, I dont see any blame heaped on the NFL or MLB for the fees they are rcving from ESPN or FOX...every team is rolling in cash...yet blame is only aimed at ESPN

     




    Not blaming just ESPn, but 10% of the workforce after a record revenue year is pretty bad.  Unless you want to show us where Fox or NBC or anyone else, please provide the data/story.

     

    Sure sounds like ESPN is the one looking to manuever on the backs of a layoff to free up cash to handle the expensive contracts they signed.

     



    I have not heard or seen offcial numbers. Unofficially, I am told there are approx 7600 employees. Approx 250 positions were eliminated (not all positions were currently filled). about 125 could be contracted. about 75 were offered re lo.   

    before you go on about profits, you have to understand Disneys business has not been great, while ESPN's has. ESPN is driving the profits for the total company. Disney had cut backs last year, ESPN is "realigning" positions now, eliminating duplication. (I dont know it as fact, but I understand an entire office was closed in Denver due to duplication)

    lastly, profits or record profits are a thing of the past...it is all about shareholder expectations today. Record profits could be attained, but still not meet the street numbers, resulting in a lowered stock price. Disney is trading up today, very close to the 52 week high, so the market reacted favorably to the moves...

     
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  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to BassFishingII's comment:

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    ATJ, as I said I can't attribute our increases to Obamacare. I really don't know why they go up, the carriers don't tell us. We've gone to a higher deductible plan and adopted a supplemental plan to help our people with the deductible. That helped keep them down for a while, but they still went up and this year, way up.  Right now, we won't be directly impacted by the ACA because we're less than 50 FTEs, but we do expect to grow.  If we do, we may need to do it with part-timers, we'll see.

    I think everyone will be impacted ultimately one way or another, even if your business is not (for now) directly affected.

     



    this is where contracted/3rd party hires helps a business...straight pay as you go help, no extraneous expenses...unfortunately its not business as we used to know it, but it is reality today.

     

    Disney recognizes it, and needs to make these unfortunate decisions to stay a healthy company. You have to feel for the 2-3%, but you have to make decisions for the 97-98%. 

     




    Dude, it's called greed.  It's not like they;re hemorraging for cash or anything.  They're just being lazy.

     

    Of course having 1099 contractors, maybe even paying more per hour than you would for salary to avoid healthcare overhead is a better move cost-wise, but you act like ESPN is offering every person laid off a contractor role and it's not the case.

     

     



    Of course that is not the case. But 50% of the people will be offered re-lo jobs or contracting jobs. Cold hearted, but reality today.

     

    Its funny, I dont see any blame heaped on the NFL or MLB for the fees they are rcving from ESPN or FOX...every team is rolling in cash...yet blame is only aimed at ESPN

     




    Not blaming just ESPn, but 10% of the workforce after a record revenue year is pretty bad.  Unless you want to show us where Fox or NBC or anyone else, please provide the data/story.

     

    Sure sounds like ESPN is the one looking to manuever on the backs of a layoff to free up cash to handle the expensive contracts they signed.

     

     



    I have not heard or seen offcial numbers. Unofficially, I am told there are approx 7600 employees. Approx 250 positions were eliminated (not all positions were currently filled). about 125 could be contracted. about 75 were offered re lo.   

     

    before you go on about profits, you have to understand Disneys business has not been great, while ESPN's has. ESPN is driving the profits for the total company. Disney had cut backs last year, ESPN is "realigning" positions now, eliminating duplication. (I dont know it as fact, but I understand an entire office was closed in Denver due to duplication)

    lastly, profits or record profits are a thing of the past...it is all about shareholder expectations today. Record profits could be attained, but still not meet the street numbers, resulting in a lowered stock price. Disney is trading up today, very close to the 52 week high, so the market reacted favorably to the moves...

     



    As stated above, if you read better, I am well aware of Wall St.  It doesn't really change the fact that Disney's poor overall outlook is now being picked up by ESPN under the Disney umbrella, on the backs of people who have nothing to do with the expectations or decision making of the people at Disney.

     

    You keep spinning and spinning, but the facts are the facts. Dick move by Disney/ESPN.

    GM used to do this same crap and everyone knew they were full of it.  Bad deals or a bad model should be at the feet of the leadership, not the underlings.

    Fire the morons who give themselves a 25 million dollar bonus and had bad ideas or bad plans for growth in this sluggish economy.

    That's really what should happened. Ask the leadership at Disney to step down if you want to cut costs.

    That'll do it.



    isnt that the same leadership that produced record profits, have maintained a very healthy company, and made ESPN a model to work for for 98% of their workforce?

    Dont you think the President of the character division who was at Disney that did not secure the Hello Kitty movie or what ever is no longer employed at Disney? To think that high level employees were spared is a mistake

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    There's an academic side to this discussion and a real life side. If you are in business (but not the CEO of Disney) you make decisions based on the information you have and based on how much money is in your operating account and how much you need to make payroll and your expected cash flow and all of that.

    You can talk academically about Disney and other companies like that and it's interesting, but I am to the CEO of Disney what a single engine Cessna pilot is to Captain Kirk. I'm worried about the wind speed and the conditions on the ground because one little slipup and I'm dead. I'm not thinking about Starfleet or Uhuru's legs, I don't have that luxury.

    Our health insurance carrier was charging us about $11K/month and quoted us almost $15K to renew.  And they basically said that next year it might double. So we have to see if there's a cheaper way to insure our people, or if there are other ways to reduce that cost like pass some of it on to the employees. Or do we make up the $4K a month by letting someone go. I don't want to do any of that, but if you want to keep the doors open it's that type of stuff that you have to consider.  

    I can't tell you whether Obamacare is the cause of those increases, I only know it isn't getting any cheaper. And if you think business is just going to absorb those kinds of increased costs for the good of the country, well good luck with that. You're going to pay for it, with your job, your pay, in the cost of goods, in higher taxes.  



    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Philskiw1. Show Philskiw1's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    There's an academic side to this discussion and a real life side. If you are in business (but not the CEO of Disney) you make decisions based on the information you have and based on how much money is in your operating account and how much you need to make payroll and your expected cash flow and all of that.

    You can talk academically about Disney and other companies like that and it's interesting, but I am to the CEO of Disney what a single engine Cessna pilot is to Captain Kirk. I'm worried about the wind speed and the conditions on the ground because one little slipup and I'm dead. I'm not thinking about Starfleet or Uhuru's legs, I don't have that luxury.

    Our health insurance carrier was charging us about $11K/month and quoted us almost $15K to renew.  And they basically said that next year it might double. So we have to see if there's a cheaper way to insure our people, or if there are other ways to reduce that cost like pass some of it on to the employees. Or do we make up the $4K a month by letting someone go. I don't want to do any of that, but if you want to keep the doors open it's that type of stuff that you have to consider.  

    I can't tell you whether Obamacare is the cause of those increases, I only know it isn't getting any cheaper. And if you think business is just going to absorb those kinds of increased costs for the good of the country, well good luck with that. You're going to pay for it, with your job, your pay, in the cost of goods, in higher taxes.  

     



    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     



    Maybe it's because the government can't run anything.  Motor vehicles is a perfect example.  Giving that much money to the government it will get squandered, stolen, wasted and most likely what services they offer won't be as good as we get now.  The government can't run anything, its really not about understanding. 

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to Philskiw1's comment:

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    There's an academic side to this discussion and a real life side. If you are in business (but not the CEO of Disney) you make decisions based on the information you have and based on how much money is in your operating account and how much you need to make payroll and your expected cash flow and all of that.

    You can talk academically about Disney and other companies like that and it's interesting, but I am to the CEO of Disney what a single engine Cessna pilot is to Captain Kirk. I'm worried about the wind speed and the conditions on the ground because one little slipup and I'm dead. I'm not thinking about Starfleet or Uhuru's legs, I don't have that luxury.

    Our health insurance carrier was charging us about $11K/month and quoted us almost $15K to renew.  And they basically said that next year it might double. So we have to see if there's a cheaper way to insure our people, or if there are other ways to reduce that cost like pass some of it on to the employees. Or do we make up the $4K a month by letting someone go. I don't want to do any of that, but if you want to keep the doors open it's that type of stuff that you have to consider.  

    I can't tell you whether Obamacare is the cause of those increases, I only know it isn't getting any cheaper. And if you think business is just going to absorb those kinds of increased costs for the good of the country, well good luck with that. You're going to pay for it, with your job, your pay, in the cost of goods, in higher taxes.  

     



    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     

     



    Maybe it's because the government can't run anything.  Motor vehicles is a perfect example.  Giving that much money to the government it will get squandered, stolen, wasted and most likely what services they offer won't be as good as we get now.  The government can't run anything, its really not about understanding. 

     



    Yet Americans seem to love their military which is, after all, a government organization, no?

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ma6dragon9. Show ma6dragon9's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    An aside about 1099 employees...

    For people that know how to do it, it can be very profitable. Here's a personal example:

    Was a Company Driver for a pharmacy. The decision came down that they were now going to outsource all deliveries, and would be laying off all drivers (6 of us). I was the new guy, and had been there only a few months.

    I took a position (route) with the transportation company. It was the exact same work I did while an employee. 1 other driver made the same move. Except, now:

    -I make MORE money

    -I do LESS work

    Why does it work out this way for me? 

    1) My significant other works in healthcare, and I am covered on her insurance.

    2) I drive 2 station wagons, a 1996 Volvo 850, and a 2000 Subaru Legacy. THey have about 165k, and 172k miles, respectively. They cost me a total of $4300. THey have been running for a combined 18 months and helped me make around 75k. Only upkeep has been an exhaust repair, and rear brake job on the subaru. They both run well, and I should see them each well into their 200s. THey are basically printing money for me.

    I went from making roughly 28k a year, to now 50k (after factoring in gas). The ONLY difference is I have to drive my own car. As noted above, I've put myself in a position to not lose money on that end. Many other couriers I see drive FAR newer cars, and whine all day about maintenance costs, insurance, and car payments. They aren't doing it right, not even close.

    I once lost a job 2 weeks after my 5 month old daughter had open heart surgery. It's a cruel, cold-hearted world. You do the best you can, and if you have a conscience, you don't do it to anyone else.

    It's frightening and intimidating to be 'self employed' when all you've known is a comfortable W2 paycheck. After educating myself, feeling stupid, and making some early mistakes...it's been fine. In fact, I've come out WAY ahead. My former coworkers at the pharmacy are all a mix of happy for me, and jealous.

    As for the other driver? He'd been there for 15 years, and was making WAY more than any other company driver I've ever heard of. So, for him, it represented a slight paycut, but almost a lateral move.

    1099 contractors are where many companies are turning. It's very low cost to get yourself a DBA (Does Business As), which then makes it possible for you to do contracting work. LLCs are decidedly more expensive and inclusive, but not usually needed for contract work. So, even if some of you have regular jobs...might not be a bad idea to go spend the $20 or so it would cost to file your DBA in case anything ever presents itself, or forces you to change.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     



    Yeah, the federal government running health care featuring the IRS, what could go wrong?

    Nobody knows what Obamacare means. Give me some numbers I can put on an excel spreadsheet and project. Don't give me the theory, what's the reality? I have no idea what it's going to cost our company to insure our employees or how any of that is going to work, and we're less than a year away from this thing being implemented. Nobody knows.

    Nobody expects that the government will get it right. Like it or not, the government is the enemy of business and the present administration's attitude toward business does not breed confidence.  

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Philskiw1. Show Philskiw1's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    In response to Philskiw1's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    There's an academic side to this discussion and a real life side. If you are in business (but not the CEO of Disney) you make decisions based on the information you have and based on how much money is in your operating account and how much you need to make payroll and your expected cash flow and all of that.

    You can talk academically about Disney and other companies like that and it's interesting, but I am to the CEO of Disney what a single engine Cessna pilot is to Captain Kirk. I'm worried about the wind speed and the conditions on the ground because one little slipup and I'm dead. I'm not thinking about Starfleet or Uhuru's legs, I don't have that luxury.

    Our health insurance carrier was charging us about $11K/month and quoted us almost $15K to renew.  And they basically said that next year it might double. So we have to see if there's a cheaper way to insure our people, or if there are other ways to reduce that cost like pass some of it on to the employees. Or do we make up the $4K a month by letting someone go. I don't want to do any of that, but if you want to keep the doors open it's that type of stuff that you have to consider.  

    I can't tell you whether Obamacare is the cause of those increases, I only know it isn't getting any cheaper. And if you think business is just going to absorb those kinds of increased costs for the good of the country, well good luck with that. You're going to pay for it, with your job, your pay, in the cost of goods, in higher taxes.  

     



    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     

     



    Maybe it's because the government can't run anything.  Motor vehicles is a perfect example.  Giving that much money to the government it will get squandered, stolen, wasted and most likely what services they offer won't be as good as we get now.  The government can't run anything, its really not about understanding. 

     

     



    Yet Americans seem to love their military which is, after all, a government organization, no?

     


    Sure we do. The military is a volunteer organization, they don't shove it down our throat. The military isn't run by the IRS. 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to Philskiw1's comment:

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    In response to Philskiw1's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    There's an academic side to this discussion and a real life side. If you are in business (but not the CEO of Disney) you make decisions based on the information you have and based on how much money is in your operating account and how much you need to make payroll and your expected cash flow and all of that.

    You can talk academically about Disney and other companies like that and it's interesting, but I am to the CEO of Disney what a single engine Cessna pilot is to Captain Kirk. I'm worried about the wind speed and the conditions on the ground because one little slipup and I'm dead. I'm not thinking about Starfleet or Uhuru's legs, I don't have that luxury.

    Our health insurance carrier was charging us about $11K/month and quoted us almost $15K to renew.  And they basically said that next year it might double. So we have to see if there's a cheaper way to insure our people, or if there are other ways to reduce that cost like pass some of it on to the employees. Or do we make up the $4K a month by letting someone go. I don't want to do any of that, but if you want to keep the doors open it's that type of stuff that you have to consider.  

    I can't tell you whether Obamacare is the cause of those increases, I only know it isn't getting any cheaper. And if you think business is just going to absorb those kinds of increased costs for the good of the country, well good luck with that. You're going to pay for it, with your job, your pay, in the cost of goods, in higher taxes.  

     



    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     

     



    Maybe it's because the government can't run anything.  Motor vehicles is a perfect example.  Giving that much money to the government it will get squandered, stolen, wasted and most likely what services they offer won't be as good as we get now.  The government can't run anything, its really not about understanding. 

     

     



    Yet Americans seem to love their military which is, after all, a government organization, no?

     

     


    Sure we do. The military is a volunteer organization, they don't shove it down our throat. The military isn't run by the IRS. 

     



    No one drafts IRS agents either so that's a nonsequitur. No denying the military is a government-run org. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

     

    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     

     



    Yeah, the federal government running health care featuring the IRS, what could go wrong?

     

    Nobody knows what Obamacare means. Give me some numbers I can put on an excel spreadsheet and project. Don't give me the theory, what's the reality? I have no idea what it's going to cost our company to insure our employees or how any of that is going to work, and we're less than a year away from this thing being implemented. Nobody knows.

    Nobody expects that the government will get it right. Like it or not, the government is the enemy of business and the present administration's attitude toward business does not breed confidence.  

     



    Try running a business in a country without a functioning government! There are plenty of those in Africa and Central Asia if you want to move your business.

     

    It would be nice if life were completely predictable, but it isn't.  The cost of healthcare is based ultimately on the cost of the healthcare services and products provided and how heavily those services and products are used.  The only way to lower healthcare costs is reduce the cost or utilization of the services and products. That's not going to happen in the American private system unless companies just stop paying for it so no one can afford it. Government systems are a bit more effective because the government can force prices down and ration care.  That changes the market, reducing healthcare services and products developed, but so far it seems not to affect quality of care.  People get fewer high-tech services, but health outcomes don't seem to be substantially worse.  The American insured and profit-driven system seems to result in more services and products that may be unnecessay being sold.  You could take away insurance and no one would be able to afford services, which would also change the market, but probably not in a desirable way.

    As far as Obama care, it does little to address underlying cost, so it's unlikely to significantly change your near-term costs or the growth rate in your costs.  However, the health insurance exchanges give you a way to just give your employees a fixed dollar contribution to their healthcare insurance and then go out and buy it themselves on an exchange.  It's sort of like a 401(k) for healthcare.  I think that will help make your costs more predictable.  There are challenges no doubt, but it's an interesting idea that may take some pressure off your business down the road.

    But no one can give you a definitive cost, any more than you can definitively predict your sales five years from now.  Uncertainty is part of business . .  and life in general.

     

     

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from pcmIV. Show pcmIV's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    I am amused by the number of people complaining about "government-run healthcare".  With the exception of England as far as I know there is no such thing as "government-run healthcare".  Even in most single payer systems the doctors and other medical professionals are not government employees.  And Obamacare is certainly not "government-run healthcare".  Unless you consider the government obligating people to purchase insurance from private sector companies so they can pay for medical services provided by the private sector "government-run".  Even all the obsession over "death panels" was ludicrous.  There is no law that won't allow you to pay out of your own pocket for any whacko treatment you want.  The IPAB was meant to decide what treatments/procedures that the government will pay for via Medicare.  That isn't "death panels".  That is fiscal responsbility and is similar to what insurance companies already do except the difference is people at insurance companies who make those decisions get compensated based on how much they can turn you down and not for evaluating cases based on the merits.  Nothing about Obamacare makes healthcare in this country "government-run". 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    So Obamacare mandates that everyone must have health insurance, and if they do not, they will face a penalty. This will be monitored by a beefed up Department of Internal Revenue Service. While this maybe is not "government run", certainly "government involved" is an apt phrase

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Philskiw1. Show Philskiw1's posts

    Re: Can't Say I Am Surprised (ESPN)

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    In response to Philskiw1's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    In response to Philskiw1's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    There's an academic side to this discussion and a real life side. If you are in business (but not the CEO of Disney) you make decisions based on the information you have and based on how much money is in your operating account and how much you need to make payroll and your expected cash flow and all of that.

    You can talk academically about Disney and other companies like that and it's interesting, but I am to the CEO of Disney what a single engine Cessna pilot is to Captain Kirk. I'm worried about the wind speed and the conditions on the ground because one little slipup and I'm dead. I'm not thinking about Starfleet or Uhuru's legs, I don't have that luxury.

    Our health insurance carrier was charging us about $11K/month and quoted us almost $15K to renew.  And they basically said that next year it might double. So we have to see if there's a cheaper way to insure our people, or if there are other ways to reduce that cost like pass some of it on to the employees. Or do we make up the $4K a month by letting someone go. I don't want to do any of that, but if you want to keep the doors open it's that type of stuff that you have to consider.  

    I can't tell you whether Obamacare is the cause of those increases, I only know it isn't getting any cheaper. And if you think business is just going to absorb those kinds of increased costs for the good of the country, well good luck with that. You're going to pay for it, with your job, your pay, in the cost of goods, in higher taxes.  

     



    This I agree with.  In any business, but particularly small ones, cash flow is critical, and healthcare costs are a huge problem because they put such pressure on both cash flow and profits. What I don't really get, though, is why American business men hate the idea of government healthcare.  I guess I'd love to see the government take it off my bottom line.  Obama care with exchanges is a path toward that actually, though relying on the private sector to provide the coverage rather than handing it over to the government.  This seems like a win for business, so I'm not sure where all the anti Obama vitriol is coming from.  Maybe people just don't understand it well enough.

     

     

     



    Maybe it's because the government can't run anything.  Motor vehicles is a perfect example.  Giving that much money to the government it will get squandered, stolen, wasted and most likely what services they offer won't be as good as we get now.  The government can't run anything, its really not about understanding. 

     

     



    Yet Americans seem to love their military which is, after all, a government organization, no?

     

     


    Sure we do. The military is a volunteer organization, they don't shove it down our throat. The military isn't run by the IRS. 

     

     



    No one drafts IRS agents either so that's a nonsequitur. No denying the military is a government-run org. 

     



    Many IRS personnel are appointed.  I assume that you renounced your us citizenship when you moved to Canada ?  My wife is Canadian, and a dr aswell. Your health care up there isn't that great. 

     
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