Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from stewart7557. Show stewart7557's posts

    Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    SI Quoting BB:


     


    “He’s played everywhere along the defensive line,” the coach said on May 8, just after the first round wrapped up. “It depends on where you put him. I’ll say you don’t see a lot of guys who do that – who play, I mean, he lines up on the nose, he lines up on the guard, he lines up on the tackle, he lines up out wide at times. You can see him playing all those spots… He does a lot of things well. He’s a smart guy, he’s very instinctive. He’s got a great motor, works hard. Football is very important to him. He’s an all-in guy. There’s not much to not like about him.”


     


    Easley’s most prominent attribute is that he can play convincingly and at a starter level in so many gaps. There are multiple examples of him blowing up protections everywhere. He even has the speed and turn to disrupt from a wide-nine stance. For his size, Easley flashes tremendous upper-body strength — he plays 20 or 30 pounds heavier than he is in that sense, but he has the field speed and agility of a linebacker when he’s in space or covering in short areas. Gets his hands on blockers right off the snap and uses his hands very well — will use hand-strikes, swim and rip moves, and pure bull-rushes to drive through or get past to the backfield. Didn’t do a lot of stunting and looping for the Gators, but he clearly has the skillset to do so. And when he’s lined up in a stunt formation (at a 45-degree angle against the line), Easley is just about unblockable because he gets through with such explosive speed.


     


    And it’s his positional versatility that makes him so appealing to the Patriots in their current defensive iterations.


     


    In two games against the Denver Broncos last season (Week 12 and the AFC Championship Game), the Patriots lined up for 166 total defensive snaps. They sacked Peyton Manning once. They amassed three quarterback hits (none in the conference championship game) and 14 quarterback hurries. And this was a defense that ranked fifth in the league in sacks with 48. But the inability to adjust personnel against no-huddle was one of the things that kept New England out of the Super Bowl. Belichick didn’t forget that Denver had 41 no-huddle snaps in the game that gave it the AFC crown.


     


    “They did a good job of mixing up plays,” Belichick said of the Broncos after that game. “As always, [Manning] did an excellent job of reading the defenses and he got us in some situations that were less than ideal with his astute play-calling and recognition. We disguised, and I think we got him a few times, but he certainly got us a few times, too. And they’ve got a lot of good players. They’re a tough team to match up against with all the skill players they have; backs, tight ends, receivers. They have, obviously a good football team, a good offensive system, and a good quarterback.”


     


    The best way — perhaps the only way — to consistently counter an NFL no-huddle offense is to acquire players who have the ability to affect the passing game without substitutions. On the fly, moving to different gaps, and with multiple techniques. That’s why the Patriots took the gamble on Easley.


     


    http://nfl.si.com/2014/06/06/break-it-down-dominique-easley-could-redefine-new-englands-defensive-fronts/


     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from CRUSTYTHECLOWN. Show CRUSTYTHECLOWN's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to stewart7557's comment:

    SI Quoting BB:

     

     No doubt he is a good player but can he stay healthy? interesting that he might have been rated as the top defensive player on the board had he not had injury issues.

     

    “He’s played everywhere along the defensive line,” the coach said on May 8, just after the first round wrapped up. “It depends on where you put him. I’ll say you don’t see a lot of guys who do that – who play, I mean, he lines up on the nose, he lines up on the guard, he lines up on the tackle, he lines up out wide at times. You can see him playing all those spots… He does a lot of things well. He’s a smart guy, he’s very instinctive. He’s got a great motor, works hard. Football is very important to him. He’s an all-in guy. There’s not much to not like about him.”

     

     

     

    Easley’s most prominent attribute is that he can play convincingly and at a starter level in so many gaps. There are multiple examples of him blowing up protections everywhere. He even has the speed and turn to disrupt from a wide-nine stance. For his size, Easley flashes tremendous upper-body strength — he plays 20 or 30 pounds heavier than he is in that sense, but he has the field speed and agility of a linebacker when he’s in space or covering in short areas. Gets his hands on blockers right off the snap and uses his hands very well — will use hand-strikes, swim and rip moves, and pure bull-rushes to drive through or get past to the backfield. Didn’t do a lot of stunting and looping for the Gators, but he clearly has the skillset to do so. And when he’s lined up in a stunt formation (at a 45-degree angle against the line), Easley is just about unblockable because he gets through with such explosive speed.

     

     

     

    And it’s his positional versatility that makes him so appealing to the Patriots in their current defensive iterations.

     

     

     

    In two games against the Denver Broncos last season (Week 12 and the AFC Championship Game), the Patriots lined up for 166 total defensive snaps. They sacked Peyton Manning once. They amassed three quarterback hits (none in the conference championship game) and 14 quarterback hurries. And this was a defense that ranked fifth in the league in sacks with 48. But the inability to adjust personnel against no-huddle was one of the things that kept New England out of the Super Bowl. Belichick didn’t forget that Denver had 41 no-huddle snaps in the game that gave it the AFC crown.

     

     

     

    “They did a good job of mixing up plays,” Belichick said of the Broncos after that game. “As always, [Manning] did an excellent job of reading the defenses and he got us in some situations that were less than ideal with his astute play-calling and recognition. We disguised, and I think we got him a few times, but he certainly got us a few times, too. And they’ve got a lot of good players. They’re a tough team to match up against with all the skill players they have; backs, tight ends, receivers. They have, obviously a good football team, a good offensive system, and a good quarterback.”

     

     

     

    The best way — perhaps the only way — to consistently counter an NFL no-huddle offense is to acquire players who have the ability to affect the passing game without substitutions. On the fly, moving to different gaps, and with multiple techniques. That’s why the Patriots took the gamble on Easley.

     

     

     

    http://nfl.si.com/2014/06/06/break-it-down-dominique-easley-could-redefine-new-englands-defensive-fronts/" rel="nofollow">http://nfl.si.com/2014/06/06/break-it-down-dominique-easley-could-redefine-new-englands-defensive-fronts/

     

     




     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    Well he had better be all we hope, because we need him to be and we drafted him high. I think this is the type of player we need - and been lacking for some time - the type of guy who can potentially ruin a passing game and make players around him better (Chandler Jones comes to mind).

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from agill1970. Show agill1970's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    If Easley recovers fully and gets that off the snap speed back, between him, Collins, Jones and Nink, QB's are going to be in serious trouble. 

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from natesubs. Show natesubs's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to agill1970's comment:

    If Easley recovers fully and gets that off the snap speed back, between him, Collins, Jones and Nink, QB's are going to be in serious trouble. 

     

    don't forget all the time revis, mccourty, browner and dennard will create for our pass rushers!


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  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bustify. Show Bustify's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    I really hope this guy can stay healthy...he seems to have so much potential, and I'd love to see what he can do if he stays on the field.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    It's all up to the recovery. If he returns up to his potential then yes he can but if injures are an issue than this will just be another log tossed on the injury pile for draft picks. It was a roll of the dice by BB that is either going to be boom or bad luck hindsight blinders


    I swear by lil 10 pound bearded baby Jesus

     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    Yeah, if this guy is good, it will be a good pick up, but if this guy is bad.....it will be a bad pick up. If he gets hurt? Well then BB should have damn well known. This is where I firmly stand, right here on the fence ready to lean which ever way best suits me.

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  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    considering he's rehabbing at least one knee, a rookie, and no professional experience, I wonder how much play time he will actually get this season. My guess is little to none.  Collins, even though its a different position, saw very little play time in the first 2/3 of last year - and he was healthy.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from tenace4life. Show tenace4life's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to OnlyDaTruth's comment:

    considering he's rehabbing at least one knee, a rookie, and no professional experience, I wonder how much play time he will actually get this season. My guess is little to none.  Collins, even though its a different position, saw very little play time in the first 2/3 of last year - and he was healthy.




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    Little different from Collins who was just a good college player coming into  the pros . . . this guy was either the best or 2nd best defensive lineman coming out of college . . . IF HEALTHY,  I know that is a big "if he will be a pro bowler within three years  . . . Seattle was certainly going to take him a couple of picks later as this guy is worth the gamble when you are drafting late in the first round.  If I were the Pats I take it slow and easy with him maybe even putting him on PUP for the first six weeks but by the playoff he will be a starter.  He is a late first round pick that could end up being as good a top 5 pick . . . certainly worth the gamble in the spot they were drafting.

     
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  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bustify. Show Bustify's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    Yeah, if this guy is good, it will be a good pick up, but if this guy is bad.....it will be a bad pick up. If he gets hurt? Well then BB should have damn well known. This is where I firmly stand, right here on the fence ready to lean which ever way best suits me.

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    Sounds about right, lol.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    Yeah, if this guy is good, it will be a good pick up, but if this guy is bad.....it will be a bad pick up. If he gets hurt? Well then BB should have damn well known. This is where I firmly stand, right here on the fence ready to lean which ever way best suits me.

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    Actually I don't think you need to do that on this one, unlike the Dowling pick - where everyone made excuses for the guy for two years - with Easley there will be no tolerance because we rolled the dice big time. If it doesn't work out there can be no excuse making. See with Dowling most of us knew he was an injury waiting to happen - the guy got hurt running his 40 during his pro day - but yet the homers made excuses for him. It won't be that way with Easley. And yet as fans we have the right to root for him because he's our first round pick and that's what we do. Sorry to break that to you truechump.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to tenace4life's comment:

    In response to OnlyDaTruth's comment:

    considering he's rehabbing at least one knee, a rookie, and no professional experience, I wonder how much play time he will actually get this season. My guess is little to none.  Collins, even though its a different position, saw very little play time in the first 2/3 of last year - and he was healthy.




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    Little different from Collins who was just a good college player coming into  the pros . . . this guy was either the best or 2nd best defensive lineman coming out of college . . . IF HEALTHY,  I know that is a big "if he will be a pro bowler within three years  . . . Seattle was certainly going to take him a couple of picks later as this guy is worth the gamble when you are drafting late in the first round.  If I were the Pats I take it slow and easy with him maybe even putting him on PUP for the first six weeks but by the playoff he will be a starter.  He is a late first round pick that could end up being as good a top 5 pick . . . certainly worth the gamble in the spot they were drafting.



    Point taken. But Easley is still rehabbing.  IMO, yeah, pro athletes might be able to get back on the field in as little as 6 months, but based on observations, it really takes them 2 years to move like they did pre-injury. So,my expectations of Easley is low.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:

    In response to OnlyDaTruth's comment:

    considering he's rehabbing at least one knee, a rookie, and no professional experience, I wonder how much play time he will actually get this season. My guess is little to none.  Collins, even though its a different position, saw very little play time in the first 2/3 of last year - and he was healthy.



    Umm, LB asks FAR MORE of his LBs than his DTs, unless he's running a 3-4.  The only one not brought along slowly was Mayo and that;s because BB convinced Brsuchi to play one more year to tutor him.

    That's why Collins was brought along slowly.  



    yep, already understood.  If you read the full context of my post - Easley is still a rookie - and recovering not from one, but really two knee injuries. To me, his total circumstances isn't a glowing position for him to contribute on day one.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Paul_K. Show Paul_K's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    I'll assume that Easley gets back to normal and stays there.  I guess that the Patriots' medical staff gave the ok.

    Easley is a brand new chess piece on the board.  Imagine playing only with pawns, rooks and bishops and then your opponent comes up with a "knight".  Suddenly your pawn structure can't keep the guy out of the backfield.

    The first issue is that Easley can start anywhere on the line, not typically attacking a lineman's strength but his foot speed.  He can stunt and loop too, dropping into coverage on uncommon occasions. 

    The other ten Patriot defensive players have to cobble together a reasonable defense while Easley takes the Blue Line to Wonderland, sort of the first 3-3 defensive front with a wild card.

    Offensive coordinators need to admit to themselves, "you're going to have this defensive guy swimming in your backfield half the time." Often as not the QB needs to get rid of the ball immediately and the RB needs to hit the hole immediately.  Dancing Maroney and waiting for the tackle to plow ahead arent' tactics that will work any more.  If you can figure out which side Easley lines up on, call an audible to run the play wide in the other direction, or else double team Easley out of the play and run through the hole where he's just been. 

    If it's third and ten, never mind the running option.  Get a big H-back and put him right beside the QB to block out Easley as he comes crashing through.

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from soxrockursox. Show soxrockursox's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    Gee wiz people can he make.it out of camp first?He could get hurt/cut no one knows.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from CRUSTYTHECLOWN. Show CRUSTYTHECLOWN's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to soxrockursox's comment:

    Gee wiz people can he make.it out of camp first?He could get hurt/cut no one knows.



    YEAH -BUT PEOPLE ARE EXCITED BECAUSE WE HAVE NEVER HAD A PLAYER LIKE EASLEY BEFORE ON THE PATRIOTS. ASSUMING HE DOES STAY HEALTHY HE SHOULD HELP TAKE THE PRESSURE OFF JONES - WILL BE HARD TO DOUBLE TEAM JONES WITH A HEALTHY EASLEY TO CONTEND WITH.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    Yeah, if this guy is good, it will be a good pick up, but if this guy is bad.....it will be a bad pick up. If he gets hurt? Well then BB should have damn well known. This is where I firmly stand, right here on the fence ready to lean which ever way best suits me.

    [object HTMLDivElement]




    Actually I don't think you need to do that on this one, unlike the Dowling pick - where everyone made excuses for the guy for two years - with Easley there will be no tolerance because we rolled the dice big time. If it doesn't work out there can be no excuse making. See with Dowling most of us knew he was an injury waiting to happen - the guy got hurt running his 40 during his pro day - but yet the homers made excuses for him. It won't be that way with Easley. And yet as fans we have the right to root for him because he's our first round pick and that's what we do. Sorry to break that to you truechump.




    Wow, you knew Dowling would be hurt? That's amazing man. Could you let us know what will happen with Easley? I'd rather not wait to find out. Also if you have any insight on whether or not Lebron will cramp up in the clutch again we would all love to hear about it. You must have cleaned up at the Belmont yesterday, what are we talking about...hundreds?  Thousands? Which was it you motor boatin sob! 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    Yeah, if this guy is good, it will be a good pick up, but if this guy is bad.....it will be a bad pick up. If he gets hurt? Well then BB should have damn well known. This is where I firmly stand, right here on the fence ready to lean which ever way best suits me.

    [object HTMLDivElement]




    Actually I don't think you need to do that on this one, unlike the Dowling pick - where everyone made excuses for the guy for two years - with Easley there will be no tolerance because we rolled the dice big time. If it doesn't work out there can be no excuse making. See with Dowling most of us knew he was an injury waiting to happen - the guy got hurt running his 40 during his pro day - but yet the homers made excuses for him. It won't be that way with Easley. And yet as fans we have the right to root for him because he's our first round pick and that's what we do. Sorry to break that to you truechump.




    Wow, you knew Dowling would be hurt? That's amazing man. Could you let us know what will happen with Easley? I'd rather not wait to find out. Also if you have any insight on whether or not Lebron will cramp up in the clutch again we would all love to hear about it. You must have cleaned up at the Belmont yesterday, what are we talking about...hundreds?  Thousands? Which was it you motor boatin sob! 



    Maybe he read it in PFW's scouting report when Dowling was drafted?  See below. His expansive injury history was well known.    

     

    With the 33rd overall pick, and the first pick of the second round, the Patriots decided to hold onto the pick and select Virginia Tech CB Ras-I Dowling, a big, physical corner. There was a thought that the Patriots could address the secondary. Leigh Bodden's health is in question after he missed all of 2010, Kyle Arrington struggled in his time as the starter and Darius Butler has yet to prove himself. Dowling's physicality matches up well with 2010 first-round CB Devin McCourty. It's likely the Patriots were hoping to move down, as Dowling could have been available later, but clearly a potential trade with the Raiders fell through. Here is PFW draft expert Nolan Nawrocki's scouting report on Dowling from the 2011 Draft Preview book:

    Notes: Also played basketball and ran track as a Virginia prep, in addition to playing safety, receiver and some quarterback, though he broke his right hand as a junior and suffered a knee injury as a senior. Failed to qualify academically out of high school and attended Hargrave Military Academy (Va.) in 2006. Played in 12 games in '07, starting two in place of the injured starter, and recorded 44 tackles (16 on kickoff coverage), nine pass breakups and two interceptions with two forced fumbles. Did not play in the '08 season opener vs. USC (strained right hamstring) but started 9-of-11 games played and logged 43-11-3 with five tackles for loss. Was forced out of the North Carolina contest because of back pain. Started all 12 games in '09, totaling 58-8-3 with 2½ tackles for loss, one sack and two forced fumbles. Had an injury-plagued season in '10, playing in five games with two starts at cornerback - managed 15-1-0 despite missing time because of a hamstring strain, right knee injury and left ankle fracture. Team captain. Strained his right hamstring running the 40-yard dash at the Combine.

    Positives: Excellent body length. Quick feet and loose hips. Good athletic ability, movement skills and body control for a tall corner. Flips his hips and runs effortlessly downfield (see Clemson '09 vs. Raiders WR Jacoby Ford). Transitions efficiently. Plants and drives quickly and breaks on throws. Has leaping ability and good hands to make plays in the air and highpoint interceptions. Has special-teams experience. Solid personal and football character. Motivated and hardworking.

    Negatives: Inconsistent. Long strider who lacks elite top-end speed. Can better use his length and be more physical rerouting receivers off the line. Soft supporting the run. Average tackler. Durability is a concern - has been hurt dating all the way back to high school, missing significant action, and could always be snakebitten.

    Summary: Tall, narrow-framed, injury-prone corner who stood out, showing more talent than Vikings '10 second-rounder Chris Cook, last season when healthy, though he has not been able to escape injuries and may never. Has the length, athletic ability and ball skills desired to match up with big receivers at the next level and could be an asset in a cover-2 defense.

    NFL projection: Third- to fourth-round pick.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    BB won't give Easley anything. Easley has to take snaps away from other players. The Pats have a nice luxury of not needing Easley to step in starting with day 1. I expect at some point Easley to play his way into approx 40% of the snaps year 1, with the bulk of them coming after the schedule break. 

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from mellymel3. Show mellymel3's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In terms of Dowling it was well known the kid had a serious injury history dating back to HS days. His middle name should have been "INDATUB". I'm sure he'll do no better for the lames in NY Green.

    Watching the films of Easley it's pretty obvious he's got a unique talent set that  will make him special - IF - his knees hold up. If they do, he'll be great. Otherwise he'll be just another wasted draft pick. Big gamble, big potential reward.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Dominique Easley could redefine New England’s defensive fronts

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:

    Yeah, if this guy is good, it will be a good pick up, but if this guy is bad.....it will be a bad pick up. If he gets hurt? Well then BB should have damn well known. This is where I firmly stand, right here on the fence ready to lean which ever way best suits me.

    [object HTMLDivElement]




    Actually I don't think you need to do that on this one, unlike the Dowling pick - where everyone made excuses for the guy for two years - with Easley there will be no tolerance because we rolled the dice big time. If it doesn't work out there can be no excuse making. See with Dowling most of us knew he was an injury waiting to happen - the guy got hurt running his 40 during his pro day - but yet the homers made excuses for him. It won't be that way with Easley. And yet as fans we have the right to root for him because he's our first round pick and that's what we do. Sorry to break that to you truechump.




    Wow, you knew Dowling would be hurt? That's amazing man. Could you let us know what will happen with Easley? I'd rather not wait to find out. Also if you have any insight on whether or not Lebron will cramp up in the clutch again we would all love to hear about it. You must have cleaned up at the Belmont yesterday, what are we talking about...hundreds?  Thousands? Which was it you motor boatin sob! 



    Maybe he read it in PFW's scouting report when Dowling was drafted?  See below. His expansive injury history was well known.    

     

    With the 33rd overall pick, and the first pick of the second round, the Patriots decided to hold onto the pick and select Virginia Tech CB Ras-I Dowling, a big, physical corner. There was a thought that the Patriots could address the secondary. Leigh Bodden's health is in question after he missed all of 2010, Kyle Arrington struggled in his time as the starter and Darius Butler has yet to prove himself. Dowling's physicality matches up well with 2010 first-round CB Devin McCourty. It's likely the Patriots were hoping to move down, as Dowling could have been available later, but clearly a potential trade with the Raiders fell through. Here is PFW draft expert Nolan Nawrocki's scouting report on Dowling from the 2011 Draft Preview book:

    Notes: Also played basketball and ran track as a Virginia prep, in addition to playing safety, receiver and some quarterback, though he broke his right hand as a junior and suffered a knee injury as a senior. Failed to qualify academically out of high school and attended Hargrave Military Academy (Va.) in 2006. Played in 12 games in '07, starting two in place of the injured starter, and recorded 44 tackles (16 on kickoff coverage), nine pass breakups and two interceptions with two forced fumbles. Did not play in the '08 season opener vs. USC (strained right hamstring) but started 9-of-11 games played and logged 43-11-3 with five tackles for loss. Was forced out of the North Carolina contest because of back pain. Started all 12 games in '09, totaling 58-8-3 with 2½ tackles for loss, one sack and two forced fumbles. Had an injury-plagued season in '10, playing in five games with two starts at cornerback - managed 15-1-0 despite missing time because of a hamstring strain, right knee injury and left ankle fracture. Team captain. Strained his right hamstring running the 40-yard dash at the Combine.

    Positives: Excellent body length. Quick feet and loose hips. Good athletic ability, movement skills and body control for a tall corner. Flips his hips and runs effortlessly downfield (see Clemson '09 vs. Raiders WR Jacoby Ford). Transitions efficiently. Plants and drives quickly and breaks on throws. Has leaping ability and good hands to make plays in the air and highpoint interceptions. Has special-teams experience. Solid personal and football character. Motivated and hardworking.

    Negatives: Inconsistent. Long strider who lacks elite top-end speed. Can better use his length and be more physical rerouting receivers off the line. Soft supporting the run. Average tackler. Durability is a concern - has been hurt dating all the way back to high school, missing significant action, and could always be snakebitten.

    Summary: Tall, narrow-framed, injury-prone corner who stood out, showing more talent than Vikings '10 second-rounder Chris Cook, last season when healthy, though he has not been able to escape injuries and may never. Has the length, athletic ability and ball skills desired to match up with big receivers at the next level and could be an asset in a cover-2 defense.

    NFL projection: Third- to fourth-round pick.




    So.....you KNEW he was going to be injured? I wish Bill was as smart as you guys. Perhaps he doesn't know how to read? 

    Gronk is another great example of BB really screwing up. If he read Gronks draft report about his back injury he would have known he was going to shatter his forearm, and get his knee caved in at full speed by a safety. The guy is so shallow.

     
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