Draft 4

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ush. Show ush's posts

    Draft 4

    The #34th pick is the sweetest spot in the draft to pick as far as value is concerned...see Hog's comment a handful or two back...so it will NOT be traded.

    I would venture to guess the pick that gets dealt is 58 or 89. We used a 3rd last year to get a 2nd this year and that's a pretty good deal...especially when SD used it on Jacob Hester...lol.

    As far as who we could take other than the usual suspects that we've been dissecting....my dark horse is Percy Harvin. He is a blend of Faulk, Welker and Moss (because he can stretch the field if needed). He could play in the slot, backfield or split out wide and could create match-up nightmares for opposing defenses.
    I don't buy the whole 'he's a Florida WR=bust' thing in this case. I think there's a chance we surprise everyone and grab him @ 23. At 34 I hope we take Barwin.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from reamer. Show reamer's posts

    Draft 4

    Anyone know anything about Jamar Love? Apparently he was a backup CB for Arkansas, and only saw the field a few timtes, but he put up some GREAT numbers at his pro day today. He's about 6'1, 190, and ran in the low 4.3s. It was his cone drill and shuttle that caught my attention, though, as they test short-area quickness and change of direction skills. Only 10 reps on the bench press worries me a little bit, but that's not terrible for a corner, I guess.

    I know measurables aren't everything, but I'd love to pick him up in the later rounds, maybe with our comp pick in the 6th or 7th. A tall, quick corner is worth spending a couple years developing, in my opinon.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from bobomul. Show bobomul's posts

    Draft 4

    [Quote]Angel,

    I don't understand why BB would trade the 34th pick, #2 in the second round for a 2010 1st when that pick could be as low as 32 overall. To risk moving up only two spots and waiting a year seems foolish. I could see trading #58 or #47 for a 2010 first but I think BB likes having these 2nd round picks.
    [/Quote]

    What?

    Didn't the Pats trade a 1st round choice (#28) in 2007 for Seatle's 1st round choice in 2008? So BB will trade a #28 for a future choice but not a #34 for a future pick? The Patriots did welll with that trade as San Francisco disapointed and NE ended up with the 7th pick in the draft. I'll take that again, thank you very much.

    I also don't think the #47 or #58 gets NE a 1st round choice in 2010 - just too high of a jump. NE traded the high 3rd pick they got from the Raiders last year (#6 in the 3rd) for an expected low pick in the 2nd (Indy) this year. #58 in 2009 for a 1st round pick just ain't happenin.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from mo-42. Show mo-42's posts

    Draft 4

    Faucet,

    In your scenario, I say the Pats pick TE Pettigrew or DL Jackson with pick #23
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from jdcfreshkickz9. Show jdcfreshkickz9's posts

    Draft 4

    By Wes Bunting
    Posted March 11, 2009
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    Behind The Times: The 10 Yard Split
    FROM WES BUNTING:

    One of the biggest misconceptions that emerge from the NFL Combine each year is the importance of 40-yard dash times. The 40 is the considered the glamour event of the Combine, and every year NFL executives, scouts, draftniks and fans (including me) get carried away by some of the mind-boggling times. This often puts too much value on a player’s ability to run fast more than it does his pure football talent. Am I saying that the testing at the Combine isn’t important? No, but the test needs to be evaluated more from a football-related standpoint.

    One of the most important and consistently overlooked measurements at the Combine is the first 10 yards of the 40, known as the 10-yard split. This is simply a measurement to see how fast a prospect can cover 10 yards. It’s great to see how fast someone can run 40 yards, but how often in an NFL game are players required to cover that distance on one play? A more reasonable measurement, and a better indicator of “football speed,” is 10 yards.

    A 10-yard split measures the short-area burst of an NFL prospect and allows scouts to determine if the prospect is a two-stepper (a player who can get up to full speed in two steps) or a strider (a player who needs to hit full stride to reach his top speed). Since football players as a whole are consistently forced to explode in and out of their breaks throughout the game, short-area explosion is a pivotal reflection of a player’s overall “football speed.”

    The 10-yard split is a vital time gauge for every position in the NFL, but it’s arguably more important for edge pass rushers than other positions. Pure pass rushing specialists who rely on their first step to gain an advantage on offensive tackles need to display explosive first-step quickness out of the stance. Therefore, the timing of a pass rusher’s 10-yard split is an excellent indicator of how quickly he can explode off the ball and cover the ground needed to get after the quarterback. So to put this into perspective, I broke down some of this year’s top hybrid defensive end/outside linebackers to give you an idea what prospects’ 10-yard splits are NFL-worthy and what prospects’ fast 40 times are simply a mirage.

    To put the 10-yard splits into perspective, I constructed a range of times using only the DE/OLB position.

    Note: NFL Combine times as a whole have gone down dramatically each of the past couple of years, so the most relevant times are those from the past three years.

    A “Great” 10-Yard Split Time (1.55 seconds and under)
    Cliff Avril, Lions: 1.50 (2008)
    Chris Long, Rams: 1.53 (2008)

    A “Good” 10-Yard Split Time (1.56-159)
    Gaines Adams, Buccaneers: 1.58 (2007)
    Derrick Harvey, Jaguars: 1.59 (2008)

    An “Average” 10-Yard Split Time (1.6-1.62)
    Kamerion Wimbley, Browns: 1.6 (2006)
    Bruce Davis, Steelers: 1.62 (2008)

    Below Average 10-Yard Split Times (1.63-1.69)
    Charles Johnson, Panthers: 1.63 (2007)
    Anthony Spencer, Cowboys: 1.64 (2007)

    With an eye toward the 2009 draft class, we can now rank the nation’s top pass rushing DE/OLB hybrids according to their 10-yard split times and break down what each time means.

    1. Clay Matthews, USC (6-3, 240), 10-yard split: 1.49
    Matthews made the jaws of a couple scouts drop after he posted a time of 1.49 seconds in his 10-yard split. To put it into perspective, only nine cornerbacks at the Combine ran faster. Matthews obviously possesses an explosive first step and gets up to speed very quickly. He’s proven he has the burst to rush off the edge, which is one reason he’s considered among the nation’s top 3-4 outside linebacker prospects.

    2. Aaron Maybin, Penn State (6-4, 249), 10-yard split: 1.55
    It’s obvious on tape that Maybin possesses an explosive first step off the edge. However, what makes him even tougher to block is his ability to consistently be the first defensive lineman moving off the snap and consistently firing off the ball on time. Maybin didn’t have the 40 time many expected (4.79), but his 10-yard split proved he has the first step to reach the edge.

    3. Connor Barwin, Cincinnati (6-4, 256), 10-yard split: 1.57
    His 4.59 40 time got all the attention, but Barwin’s ability to coil up in his stance and fire off the ball will make him a success in the NFL. He’s a gifted athlete who has the motor and burst to get after the quarterback. However, his 1.57 split proves he has the first-step explosion to make things happen as a down defensive end.

    4. Everette Brown, Florida State (6-2, 256), 10-yard split: 1.58
    Brown measured in a bit shorter than expected at the Combine but ran well, even though I expected his split to be a bit faster. However, Brown plays so low that it’s tough for offensive tackles to get a good punch on him. Brown isn’t just a straight-line athlete; his ability to bend and dip around the edge coupled with his burst allows him to create a lot of havoc versus the pass.

    5. Clint Sintim, Virginia (6-3, 256), 10-yard split: 1.59
    Sintim displays impressive get-off speed for his size and showcases good explosion from a two-point stance. There isn’t much flash to his game, but he has enough burst to be a solid contributor off the edge and get after the passer.

    6. Larry English, Northern Illinois (6-2, 255), 10-yard split: 1.64
    I worried about English’s ability to coil up and fire out of his stance on film, and his time confirms my suspicions. He consistently comes off the ball too high for my liking, and I don’t think he has the burst to be successful as a pass rushing defensive end. English needs to stand up in a two-point stance to be effective, but his 4.82 40 time doesn’t do much for teams concerned about his ability to play in space.

    Overall, the 10-yard split is simply another tool to help scouts determine the caliber of player they’re evaluating. Now, I would not consider the 10-yard split to be the end all of evaluations for pass rushers because there are always expectations and other athletic tests to help evaluate them (short shuttle and three-cone drills). However, when scouting pass rushers, I think it’s critical to put more weight on the 10-yard split than a more attractive 40-yard time.

    http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/2009/03/behind-the-times-the-10-yard-split/



    http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/2009/03/diner-morning-news-21/

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from KyleCleric2. Show KyleCleric2's posts

    Draft 4

    [Quote]The #34th pick is the sweetest spot in the draft to pick as far as value is concerned...see Hog's comment a handful or two back...so it will NOT be traded.

    I would venture to guess the pick that gets dealt is 58 or 89. We used a 3rd last year to get a 2nd this year and that's a pretty good deal...especially when SD used it on Jacob Hester...lol.

    As far as who we could take other than the usual suspects that we've been dissecting....my dark horse is Percy Harvin. He is a blend of Faulk, Welker and Moss (because he can stretch the field if needed). He could play in the slot, backfield or split out wide and could create match-up nightmares for opposing defenses.
    I don't buy the whole 'he's a Florida WR=bust' thing in this case. I think there's a chance we surprise everyone and grab him @ 23. At 34 I hope we take Barwin.
    [/Quote]

    I actually like the idea of Harvin if he lasts to 23. If it did happen, it would likely indicate that the Pats won't be trading any of their 2nd round picks. At that point, there would still be some fairly major needs to address on defense, LB at 34, safety/corner at 47, DL at 58, perhaps.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ush. Show ush's posts

    Draft 4

    That's a good post JD...thanks for hoisting that up on the board.

    Sintim seems to be quietly lurking right now...but I think he's a solid pick in the 2nd round.

    Still don't like Maybin...look at him in the pic trying to catch that pass, he looks like he doesn't know how to catch. I know he's not a DB, but I guarantee you Barwin looks much more comfortable catching the football. No way Maybin makes that play James Harrison made in the SB...Barwin at least might.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from angel3781. Show angel3781's posts

    Draft 4

    [Quote]I agree that BB loves to stock pile picks and he will trade a current pick for a sure-to-be higher future pick if he feels there is nobody he wants where he is at and he's happy with where the team is. If you look back two years before we went 18-0 and we just traded for Moss and Welker I was telling everyone that I didn't see how more than 1-3 guys we drafted could make this team. (turns out only Meriweather made the 53 man roster) We were so loaded.

    I can't say that now. Some of these recent signings of our own players will not make the team. BB has been doing this over the past several years. He's plugging holes in free agency so that when he enters the draft he isn't looking to fill holes, he's truly looking for the BPA. He will then go to camp to see who wins out and if a rookie beats out a F/A veteran, the veteran will be cut. I could see guys like Woods, Alexander, Ruud and potentially even TBC cut if we draft some stud LBs.

    My point is we would trade picks for future picks if we feel good about who we have and that there will be value next year. This year however, we have 4 prime picks in the meat of the draft where there is solid talent. There are several good reasons why we shouldn't trade out of this draft and instead use those late round picks to move up to target certain players if need be.

    1. Tom Brady turns 32 this year. He has maybe 2-3 good years left so the future is now.
    2. There is elite talent available at our top 4 picks
    3. We have a ton of players scheduled to become F/A after the season. I expect after the season to be the biggest raid on Pats players ever. Now's the time to start developing some replacements for guys we think we can't resign (Seymour/Green) and guys who will likely retire (Faulk/Bruschi). Our entire offensive line become free agents except Light and Koppen and this is a solid draft for versatile linesmen where we could get 2-3 future starters.
    4. This team is upgradeable via the draft at several positions like SS, OLB, ILB, #3WR, FB, maybe CB and OL.

    I'm hoping we come out of this draft with 5-6 now or future starters.

    4.[/Quote]

    Faucetman,

    1. I'm willing to bet that Tom Brady has more than just 2-3 good years left. In fact, I'd say that it's more closer to at least 5 good seasons, because he's a pocket quaterback and doesn't rely on being this great athlete.

    2. I don't think that this draft has any elite talent. This is widely considered by scouts to be a weak draft. Sure, there's some really good players available (especially were we will be selecting), but to call them elite is a big stretch.

    3. We do have lots of players scheduled for free agency after next season, however we aren't in a good position this year to get an adequate replacement for Seymour, plus we have the ability to just franchise him if need be (although it would be expensive). More than likely, We may be looking at inexpensive free agent pickups as replacements, because I doubt very seriously that BB want's to trot out a team comprised of 40-50% first or second year players. BB tends to favor vets if anything.

    4. Just becuase I feel that BB will deal at least one or more picks doesn't mean we can't get an OLB, S, or OL etc..., we have plenty of picks in the top 60 in addition to plenty of lower picks in the 3rd and 4th round to deal in case we decide to try and move up the board.

    My point is that you can't just fill every need at once because it never works out that way. You cant make a guy fit ust because you need him to. I would be happy if we have 3-4 starters out of this draft, and hopeully have extra picks next year to keep filling even more holes. Honestly what we need more than anything are playmakers. The past few seasons we have really been de-void of big play capability due to a purge in talent, coaching, and injuries. Faucet to worry, 32 years old is hardly ancient for a QB, and I've personally heard Tom in interviews this year stating that he want to play 'til 40. So even if a 39-40 is 80% of what he is now, that's still pretty damn good/SB caliber.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from angel3781. Show angel3781's posts

    Draft 4

    Sorry for the typos, my keyboard is acting weird.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from _008_. Show _008_'s posts

    Draft 4

    Although we have an obvious void to fill at OLB, BB has proven time after time that he is unpredictable. I really think he will take the best player available at #23, regardless of the position. Taking OLB is too easy! Which leads me to think it'll either be the second running back off the board or the first tight end. Chris Wells(not sure he'll be there at 23) or Brandon Pettigrew. Don't see him taking a WR here, don't see anyone jump out at that spot.

    Then I totally see him trading #34 for next year's picks. Probably next year's 2nd and 4th/5th round. He'll then take a safety or LB at #47. #58 or #89 will be a OL/DL, wide receiver in the later rounds.

    Personally I would love to see him take a OLB or ILB at #23 but I can see him looking for a raw talent in the later rounds.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from reamer. Show reamer's posts

    Draft 4

    Because I'm borderline O/C about the draft, I've been going over new scenarios in my head the past couple days, and I think I've hammered out a respectible, reasonable draft. It's not as flashy or star-studded as I'd like, but it's solid, realistic, and gives us great depth for the future.

    According to recent reports, we ought to receive comp picks in the third, fifth, and sixth, giving us a staggering total of eleven picks in the upcoming draft. I've tried to target players who could have good long-term success in our program

    Round One - William Beatty.
    Matt Light's replacement, Beatty is instantly the top backup tackle on the line while he spends a year gaining weight/strength and refining his technique. I like that speed won't beat him off the edge.

    Round Two (a) - Connor Barwin.
    Tough. Fast. Versatile. Iintelligtent. There's nothing I don't like about Barwin.

    Round Two (b) - Patrick Chung. Seems to be slipping a bit in comparison with the other safety prospects, but I don't see one I like better. I'd prefer to get a corner here so as to invest in the future, but the ones I like (Davis, S. Smith, Butler) will probably be gone by now, so this pick has good value.

    Round Two (c) - Jarron Gilbert. We need to develop better linemen behind Seymour and Warren, as our backups don't exactly inspire confidence. Gilbert is massively talented and freakishly athletic for a man his size. He's in great shape, and could probably add 10 - 15 pounds over the next couple years without sacrificing agility and quicknesss.

    Round Three - James Casey. Possibly the most intriuging and versatile offensive player in the draft, Casey has exceptional hands, toughness, and mature athleticism. He's played TE, FB, RB, QB, WR, and even a bit of defense. Oh, and he has a 95 mph fastball. Cool guy.

    Round Three (comp) - Fenuki Tupou. Huge, quick, powerful run-blocker, Tupou instantly upgrades the right tackle spot for the next decade. He's surprisingly nimble for a big right tacle, and I just really like his game for some reason.

    Round Four - Jasper Brinkley. Big thumper in the middle. He's on the rebound from a knee injury, and appears to be regaining his athleticism, but his injury may help depress his stock. This is the biggest gamble of my mock, I think; he could end up going a lot earlier than this.

    Round Five (com) - Everette Pedescleaux. He's bigger, faster, and more athletic than Ty Warren, and from the looks of this video has great instincts and fluidity for a man his size. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GH9lJT3lK8

    Round Six - Andy Kemp. Seems to be the consensus guard on this board. I've seen many sites project him as undrafted, but I'd dance in the street if we pick him up in the sixth.

    Round Six (comp) - Devin Moore. Kevin Faulk replacement in a couple years. He's an excellent returner as well as third-down back.

    Round Seven - Jamar Love. I'm taking him based purely on three arbitrary critieria: 1) his exceptional size/speed workout numbers, 2) the inflated value of CB contracts and thus the increased value of drafting CBs, and 3) so our last two picks could be Moore Love, which is an absolutely terrible pun but makes me laugh anyway.


    This gives us two DL, three OL, two LBs (outside, inside), two DBs (safety, corner), a TE/FB/WR, and a RB. This seems to be the best mix of linemen and skill players, and I think would be an incredibly strong though not exactly flashy draft. I know this is similiar to a few of the drafts I've already seen on here, but I think I focus on a different philosophy/order in the draft.

    April 25th can't get here fast enough!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from reamer. Show reamer's posts

    Draft 4

    Between the time I leave the house and head to school, I've already debated, rejected, changed, and finally returned to my draft. How pathetic is that? *grin*
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from JohnHannahrulz. Show JohnHannahrulz's posts

    Draft 4

    One of Kiper's mocks has RM at #23. I gotta be honest, I still can't see him there and I like it when the Pats draft players that are rising (Mayo, Wilfork,Seymour) more than guys that are falling. With possible exception being Chad Jackson. Still with RM and Mayo at ILB the Pats would be set for the next 5 years.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from zbellino. Show zbellino's posts

    Draft 4

    [Quote]The talk of Rey as just a 2 down linebacker doesn't scare me at all. That's pretty much what I want from him, someone who will dominate the first couple of downs next to Mayo. He'll just make Mayo and the other LBs so much better. On third down, we have both Bruschi and Guyton who can do that job really well. At 34, we can take the best pass rusher or we could move up for one. Maualuga opens up that pick to any of them as Maybin (gone), English, and Mathews all would have great roles as pass rushers at the ROLB spot. The goal would then be pass rushing and not the versatility necessary of the OLBs to stop inside runs.[/Quote]


    Except when the Colts (or some other team for that matter) decides to run no huddle. Then you are a victim of mistmatches. Or maybe they just decide to throw at RM on first down and invert the order.

    Platooning linebackers is not the way to go, for obvious reasons. Only in certain cirumstances (like short yardage or nickel/dime situations) is it realy beneficial.

    And even though I don't think he will end up as a two down guy, using a #23 on a two down linebacker just isn't part of the conversation. You can get those guys on day two or cheap in FA.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from zbellino. Show zbellino's posts

    Draft 4

    Please. Don't say that was BS, not when you are essentially arguing against the most common football logic.

    I mean really. I have been watching the draft for years.

    Two down linebackers go on day two, or sometimes not at all. It is the kiss of death for inside linebackers,and universally diminishes their stock.

    Or do you think they put him in "potential bust" category because scouts are thrilled to draft a running down linebacker in the first?

    And who is "we"? If by we you mean you then ok. But if by we you mean NE that isn't true at all. Ne has constantly resorted to getting dirt cheap big ILBs to fill that role (and more), often times more effectively than Johnson.

    Johnson retired. He was injured all the time anyway. Did Ne start getting gashed in the run? Am I missing something? They miss Johnson? Excpet for when they had Brian Cox, Roman Phifer and Junior Seau of course. They can't keep up with Johnson's towering 60-70 tackles per season, when healthy of course.

    With the exception of last season they have never finished outside the top 10 in rush defense. And their best season against the run in 2003, Ted Johnson missed half of the entire year. Roman Phifer was the everydown guy. And stuffed the run perfectly fine while Johnson sat on the IR.

    The statistics simply don't support this arguement that a.) a dedicated run stuffer is hard to find, and b.) Ted Johnson was integral to anything considering the seasons NE had its best defense and won superbowls were the seasons he was sidelined with various neck and back injuries.

    In fact, every statistic points to the rush defense improving with the addition of Warren and Ted Washington and later Wilfork. And a dip this season most likely being attributed to Warren missing serious time, as teams started really pounding the ball at Wright.

    And your Colts scenario is reductive at best. How about the Bills who can run Marshawn Lynch or throw to any of their two pro-bowl caliber wideouts? Or the Steelers? Etc, etc, etc. Or how about the plain fact that a healthy RB crew in Indy will make their running game better than it was last season?

    Two down doesn't mean they play every two downs, it usually means a guy who can only stack the run and is brought in in obvious situations. And Guyton is a two down linebacker himself. That is the big knock on him. He doesn't get pass coverage. He is almost the exact same size as Maualuga, and has very similar strengths. Just use him on rushing downs, and hope he can develop the inconsistent areas of his game

    NE got him for free last season, and he did his job very well. Why would they spend a frist rounder on a guy to do the same thing?

    TJ was drafted as a every down linebacker and forced into limited duty because of injuries and a lack of skill. If any team thought he would have turned out to be what he was they would have taken him on day two.

    If Ne is drafting an ILB anywhere in the first two rounds it is because they think he is an every down guy.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from zbellino. Show zbellino's posts

    Draft 4

    [Quote]I'm not worried about RM in coverage. He's faster than the 4.81 injury timed 40. I've seen him look decent in coverage and besides, he has to be faster than Bruschi. If a team goes no huddle, leave him in. We'll have Mayo in there and help from the safety. I'm more worried about our starting strongside LB. Who will it be and how will they be in coverage?[/Quote]

    Faucet,

    At #23 Idon't worry about it because he has shown the ability to be a quick handed zone defender. And yes, I am sure he is faster than his 4.81 time, and most of the concerns about his overall range as a defender are overblown at this point, mainly because of the combine.

    I spent so long playing devil's advocate against him, and now his stock is lower than where I would put it, so it is time to build him back up.

    I still think #16-#20 is where he comes off the board. If he has a great pro-day, then he can get back in the #10-15 area. If he cannot work out, he might slip a little more.

    I think it just scares people who would be looking at him in the #10-15 range, because the money is greater,and if he doesn't pan out, you are stuck with a spare part type player at a starting salary. Even at #23 that is a major concern, but he isn't so dense that it is paramount.

    The BIG thing that is good in that department is that he is a loose natural athlete, and typically the "two down" guys (like Brinkley for instance) are knocked for being really stiff and monodirectional. With RM it is more a question of range, and I think the film will show that he has more range than his timed speed indicates.

    And I like your mock beneath. Although I still am nt sure RM slips that much, and would want to use 48 to do something other than RB.

    CB/S or WR might be my selection if things fell that way.

    Unger is a tricky propect, because I see him go high and low. I think (IIRC) that #47 is splitting the difference of where scouts have ranked him. So it might be solid. I would prefer Mack myself, but I really like both kids.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from pyegian. Show pyegian's posts

    Draft 4

    Count me among the minority that doesn't want Maualuga. He scares the hell out of me as another "hype" player who's flashy plays mask glaring weaknesses that will show up in the NFL.

    Guyton is much, much faster than Maualuga. His potential in the passing game is better because of that speed, even if he'll never be the hitter Maualuga is.

    A dominant edge rusher is with out question the #1 need on this entire team.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from pyegian. Show pyegian's posts

    Draft 4

    Letting Seymour go would just be stupid. You can resign Wilfork, all the cornerbacks, and anyone else, and the defense would still be worse.

    Seymour needs to be back unless they can steal an absolute stud somewhere in the draft. This 3-4 defense is dependent on dominant defensive line play.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from MVPkilla. Show MVPkilla's posts

    Draft 4

    ok so im not reading through 63 other posts lol so whats the hot topic right now so i can jump in lol
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from bobomul. Show bobomul's posts

    Draft 4

    Zbel,

    Who's saying that Maualaga is just a 2 down back? And, athough I like Guyton, everything written about RM indicate he's got better instincts, is more fluid and has better range than Guyton.

    But how much will any of them play on 3rd downs/passing downs? NE pobably played a majority of those downs in Nickel packages. That trend is only growing with the prominance of the 3WR sets we're seeing. Mayo stays in but the other ILB is removed.

    So even if RM is good in coverage, he's mostly going to be used as a 2 down LB anyways.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from MVPkilla. Show MVPkilla's posts

    Draft 4

    m
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from MVPkilla. Show MVPkilla's posts

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    Unless he is better then Mayo in coverage....
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from angel3781. Show angel3781's posts

    Draft 4

    All this talk of Maualuga not being a good prospect due to a 4.8 40 reminds me of when Terrell Suggs was coming out. The year that he was drafted, he was considered a top 3 prospect but he too ran a 4.8 40 and all of a sudden scouts started making comments like he will not be able to get to the QB at the next level because he's too slow etc... What happend....he slid all the way down to about the 12th pick to the Ravens. Needless to say the scouts and the talking heads on ESPN were wrong. So, I hope history repeats itself again, and Maualuga slips to #23.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from bunchofpixels. Show bunchofpixels's posts

    Draft 4

    I think we need another blue chip talent on the LB corps. We need another safety. Besides that just draft for depth.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from zbellino. Show zbellino's posts

    Draft 4

    bobomul,

    That isn't necessarily true. While one linebacker is used in nickel packages, the 3-4 set hangs around on passing downs quite frequently. Especially near the goal line. It offers a tremendous versatility that Nickel does not.

    So getting a starting every down Mike only adds to that effect. Junior Seau showed flashes in 2007 of being that guy, but most of the time was a bit slow. Having a guy who can get it done adds wonders.

    Also, having two ILBs that can cover and stuff helps confuse the offense. Any time you can make them guess who the MIKE is before the play, you are already winning.

    Lastly, I don't think anyone thinks that seriously. They just look at the downside of the player. I think it is almost a bonus for an ILB, simply because it at least gives him an NFL caliber floor. A lot of prospects have stratospheric ceilings and a floor that puts them out of the leauge after a two or three year meet and greet. LOL.

    I think in 3-4 Maualuga can be a star. A bonafide star. But he has some downside that scares people high.
     

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