Edelman and Amendola

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from DougIrwin. Show DougIrwin's posts

    Edelman and Amendola

    Apparently, Edelman had Amendola train with him this offseason with some guy named Guerrero who apparently is a specialist who Edelman relies on to stay healthy.


    Without any of us ever being a pro athlete, we have no idea how on top of their body a consistently healthy athlete would need to be, but I would imagine everything from being dilligent and consistent with everything you do is vital.


    Anyway, interesting note here about it:


    Three and out from Patriots camp:


    1) An underrated key to New England's success on offense? A clean slate of health for Danny Amendola. There's reason to believe Amendola, in his second season with the Pats, could follow the path that Julian Edelman blazed last year. Over his first four years in New England, Edelman lost 16 games to injuries, and they always seemed to occur just as he was about to break out. He went to Tom Brady's trainer, Alex Guerrero, for help. What he learned was that, while there's always luck involved, you can tilt the odds in your favor. "Football is not just a job, it is a lifestyle," Edelman told me. "As a professional athlete, that is what you have to try to do, stay as healthy as you can. As you know, it is a rough game. The more you can prevent things from happening, the flexibility, having all your muscles fluid and loose kind of like a rubber band, the best results you can get. ... There is a factor of luck. But there is also a factor of knowing when to take a risk on a certain play, knowing a situation in a game. Do you have to go in and take that big hit? Knowing when the journey is over on getting hit. Knowing not to cut back where the big men are. And there's also rest, recovery and hydration." Edelman played 16 games for the first time in his career last year, and caught 105 passes. He referred the injury-plagued Amendola to Guerrero, and the two worked together this offseason.


     


    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from cyncalpatfan. Show cyncalpatfan's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Apparently, Edelman had Amendola train with him this offseason with some guy named Guerrero who apparently is a specialist who Edelman relies on to stay healthy.

     

    Without any of us ever being a pro athlete, we have no idea how on top of their body a consistently healthy athlete would need to be, but I would imagine everything from being dilligent and consistent with everything you do is vital.

     

    Anyway, interesting note here about it:

     

    Three and out from Patriots camp:

     

    1) An underrated key to New England's success on offense? A clean slate of health for Danny Amendola. There's reason to believe Amendola, in his second season with the Pats, could follow the path that Julian Edelman blazed last year. Over his first four years in New England, Edelman lost 16 games to injuries, and they always seemed to occur just as he was about to break out. He went to Tom Brady's trainer, Alex Guerrero, for help. What he learned was that, while there's always luck involved, you can tilt the odds in your favor. "Football is not just a job, it is a lifestyle," Edelman told me. "As a professional athlete, that is what you have to try to do, stay as healthy as you can. As you know, it is a rough game. The more you can prevent things from happening, the flexibility, having all your muscles fluid and loose kind of like a rubber band, the best results you can get. ... There is a factor of luck. But there is also a factor of knowing when to take a risk on a certain play, knowing a situation in a game. Do you have to go in and take that big hit? Knowing when the journey is over on getting hit. Knowing not to cut back where the big men are. And there's also rest, recovery and hydration." Edelman played 16 games for the first time in his career last year, and caught 105 passes. He referred the injury-plagued Amendola to Guerrero, and the two worked together this offseason.

     

     

     

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014

    [/QUOTE]


    It couldn't hurt!

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

     

     Seems to support the idea that some guys really may be injury prone--maybe not genetically but because of the way they play and how they treat their bodies.

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from DougIrwin. Show DougIrwin's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    I thought Edelman's comments were spot on there. I mentioned this before and used the term "balling up" or making yourself small when the defense is in pursuit.  Troy Brown was a master at it and Welker and Branch were also very good at simply going down while protecting the ball, knowing they had a 1st down.

    People mocked Brandon Lloyd for doing it  here, but I'd rather see conservative YAC activity than fumbling or unnecessary risks, especially with the lead.

    Again, Troy Brown was so good with this, especially on 3rds.  You could just see the opposing D's wind go out of their sails with the sticks with Troy or Welkie knowing where they were and a 1st down captured moving clock and the sticks.

    Edelman is very good at knowing when to concede or get more yards, too.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from digger0862. Show digger0862's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    Edelman, Amendola, Gronk, there's 3,000 yards. Dobson, LaFell, Thompkins and Boyce get to split the other 2,000 yards.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from DougIrwin. Show DougIrwin's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to digger0862's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Edelman, Amendola, Gronk, there's 3,000 yards. Dobson, LaFell, Thompkins and Boyce get to split the other 2,000 yards.

    [/QUOTE]


    And, if that happens?  The Miserables will biyatch and moan that the others that Brady does not throw to as much are crappy players that BB somehow missed on.

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Section136. Show Section136's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I thought Edelman's comments were spot on there. I mentioned this before and used the term "balling up" or making yourself small when the defense is in pursuit.  Troy Brown was a master at it and Welker and Branch were also very good at simply going down while protecting the ball, knowing they had a 1st down.

    People mocked Brandon Lloyd for doing it  here, but I'd rather see conservative YAC activity than fumbling or unnecessary risks, especially with the lead.

    Again, Troy Brown was so good with this, especially on 3rds.  You could just see the opposing D's wind go out of their sails with the sticks with Troy or Welkie knowing where they were and a 1st down captured moving clock and the sticks.

    Edelman is very good at knowing when to concede or get more yards, too.

    [/QUOTE]


    Like to see Gronk meet this guy! Thanks, Doug.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Section136. Show Section136's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to digger0862's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Edelman, Amendola, Gronk, there's 3,000 yards. Dobson, LaFell, Thompkins and Boyce get to split the other 2,000 yards.

    [/QUOTE]


    From your mouth to God's ears!

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bungalow-Bill. Show Bungalow-Bill's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to digger0862's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Edelman, Amendola, Gronk, there's 3,000 yards. Dobson, LaFell, Thompkins and Boyce get to split the other 2,000 yards.

    [/QUOTE]


    And, if that happens?  The Miserables will biyatch and moan that the others that Brady does not throw to as much are crappy players that BB somehow missed on.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    And when those guys get shutdown in the playoffs by a team that isn't in the s**tbird afc east, youll blame Brady. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from DougIrwin. Show DougIrwin's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    ^Sounds great, Bustchise aka "Bingo Billy".

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

     Seems to support the idea that some guys really may be injury prone--maybe not genetically but because of the way they play and how they treat their bodies.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I think Amendola is a good example of this.

    There has been a lot of speculation that if Dobson and Lafell can step up, that Amendola would be much more effective and obviously healthy with managed snaps. Less is more if you will.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to cyncalpatfan's comment:

    It couldn't hurt!

    [/QUOTE]

    Exactly the way I see it.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I thought Edelman's comments were spot on there. I mentioned this before and used the term "balling up" or making yourself small when the defense is in pursuit.  Troy Brown was a master at it and Welker and Branch were also very good at simply going down while protecting the ball, knowing they had a 1st down.

    People mocked Brandon Lloyd for doing it  here, but I'd rather see conservative YAC activity than fumbling or unnecessary risks, especially with the lead.

    Again, Troy Brown was so good with this, especially on 3rds.  You could just see the opposing D's wind go out of their sails with the sticks with Troy or Welkie knowing where they were and a 1st down captured moving clock and the sticks.

    Edelman is very good at knowing when to concede or get more yards, too.

    [/QUOTE]


    I think professional hockey players are a good example of guys avoiding serious injury almost every night, these guy almost never take a direct hit. Every NHL defense man is in tune with avoiding those hits along the boards, it's a thing of beauty really and takes skill/quickness/body control. I think it's the same way with these receivers and runners, when they contort their bodies just enough, or hold up just a bit...they can avoid so much damage and stay on the field consistently.

    There are other factors too - you hear about "flexible" athletes all the time - those guys seem to have a huge asset over a "stiff" athlete. The stiff athletes just don't bend well, they're tight in their hips, knees and they end up getting something torn on a play that doesn't look like it would lead to anything more than a sprain...or nothing at all. I think that is part of the problem with Amendola, he looks stiff out there to me. None of his movements look real smooth or fluid to me. He looks like a guy that is working very very hard on that field, where it looks like it is coming very easy to others...it's tough to explain really.

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from crazy-world-of-troybrown. Show crazy-world-of-troybrown's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to digger0862's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Edelman, Amendola, Gronk, there's 3,000 yards. Dobson, LaFell, Thompkins and Boyce get to split the other 2,000 yards.

    [/QUOTE]

    Actually I like to see 1,000 yards to Running Backs, then I know the Defense has to Defend the whole field. That's when an Offense really works.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Apparently, Edelman had Amendola train with him this offseason with some guy named Guerrero who apparently is a specialist who Edelman relies on to stay healthy.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    Alex Guerrero is TFB's trainer, helped Brady recover from ACL/MCL and get ready for the 2009 season.  Helped Welker recover so quickly from his ACL injury. Edelman used him prior to last season and remained healthy all last season.  Amendola used him this past off season. I have high hopes it will help Amendola to remain healthy all season. 

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from DoNotSleepOnThePats. Show DoNotSleepOnThePats's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    Thanks for the read, Russ.  Good stuff!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from bostatewarrior. Show bostatewarrior's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    Amendola looks a bit reckless sometimes.  He needs to step out of bounds or go down once in a while. Let Devlin blow up the linebackers.  Little guys need to avoid them.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from digger0862. Show digger0862's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to crazy-world-of-troybrown's comment:

    Actually I like to see 1,000 yards to Running Backs, then I know the Defense has to Defend the whole field. That's when an Offense really works.

    Doh! I forgot the running backs. Hooman too. Brady is just going to have to throw more.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from DougIrwin. Show DougIrwin's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to bostatewarrior's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Amendola looks a bit reckless sometimes.  He needs to step out of bounds or go down once in a while. Let Devlin blow up the linebackers.  Little guys need to avoid them.

    [/QUOTE]

    I agree. Like the hit he took vs NOs.  Everyone knows he's tough, he just needs to play smart.  As does Gronk.

    I wouldn't mind seeing Gronk concede a bit here and there.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Apparently, Edelman had Amendola train with him this offseason with some guy named Guerrero who apparently is a specialist who Edelman relies on to stay healthy.

     

    Without any of us ever being a pro athlete, we have no idea how on top of their body a consistently healthy athlete would need to be, but I would imagine everything from being dilligent and consistent with everything you do is vital.

     

    Anyway, interesting note here about it:

     

    Three and out from Patriots camp:

     

    1) An underrated key to New England's success on offense? A clean slate of health for Danny Amendola. There's reason to believe Amendola, in his second season with the Pats, could follow the path that Julian Edelman blazed last year. Over his first four years in New England, Edelman lost 16 games to injuries, and they always seemed to occur just as he was about to break out. He went to Tom Brady's trainer, Alex Guerrero, for help. What he learned was that, while there's always luck involved, you can tilt the odds in your favor. "Football is not just a job, it is a lifestyle," Edelman told me. "As a professional athlete, that is what you have to try to do, stay as healthy as you can. As you know, it is a rough game. The more you can prevent things from happening, the flexibility, having all your muscles fluid and loose kind of like a rubber band, the best results you can get. ... There is a factor of luck. But there is also a factor of knowing when to take a risk on a certain play, knowing a situation in a game. Do you have to go in and take that big hit? Knowing when the journey is over on getting hit. Knowing not to cut back where the big men are. And there's also rest, recovery and hydration." Edelman played 16 games for the first time in his career last year, and caught 105 passes. He referred the injury-plagued Amendola to Guerrero, and the two worked together this offseason.

     

     

     

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014

    [/QUOTE]


    Good stuff, thanks

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from freediro. Show freediro's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to crazy-world-of-troybrown's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to digger0862's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Edelman, Amendola, Gronk, there's 3,000 yards. Dobson, LaFell, Thompkins and Boyce get to split the other 2,000 yards.

    [/QUOTE]

    Actually I like to see 1,000 yards to Running Backs, then I know the Defense has to Defend the whole field. That's when an Offense really works.

    [/QUOTE]

    I see Edelman, AD, Gronk,all with 800-900 yards, while LaFell, Dobson and Thompkins split up 2000 yards and Vereen gets around 300 or so

     

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from agill1970. Show agill1970's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    The problem with Amendola is he still has the type of mindset he had in college.  At 5'11", 195lbs and very powerfully built, that's how he played, powerfully.  While he's never been a big guy, he could out power most people he came in contact with and he relished contact.  In the pros, that has been a disadvantage to him and he's never quite adjusted. 

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Quagmire3. Show Quagmire3's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    [/QUOTE]

    It couldn't hurt!

    [/QUOTE]

    Pun intended?! Lol

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from portfolio1. Show portfolio1's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to agill1970's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The problem with Amendola is he still has the type of mindset he had in college.  At 5'11", 195lbs and very powerfully built, that's how he played, powerfully.  While he's never been a big guy, he could out power most people he came in contact with and he relished contact.  In the pros, that has been a disadvantage to him and he's never quite adjusted. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Im not sure about who gets what yardage but I think you are underestimating the mismatches with Vereen. I would think 500 is more of a reasonable but conservative number if he is healthy and who knows what the top might be... 

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheRealBustchise. Show TheRealBustchise's posts

    Re: Edelman and Amendola

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:


    Apparently, Edelman had Amendola train with him this offseason with some guy named Guerrero who apparently is a specialist who Edelman relies on to stay healthy.


     


    Without any of us ever being a pro athlete, we have no idea how on top of their body a consistently healthy athlete would need to be, but I would imagine everything from being dilligent and consistent with everything you do is vital.


     


    Anyway, interesting note here about it:


     


    Three and out from Patriots camp:


     


    1) An underrated key to New England's success on offense? A clean slate of health for Danny Amendola. There's reason to believe Amendola, in his second season with the Pats, could follow the path that Julian Edelman blazed last year. Over his first four years in New England, Edelman lost 16 games to injuries, and they always seemed to occur just as he was about to break out. He went to Tom Brady's trainer, Alex Guerrero, for help. What he learned was that, while there's always luck involved, you can tilt the odds in your favor. "Football is not just a job, it is a lifestyle," Edelman told me. "As a professional athlete, that is what you have to try to do, stay as healthy as you can. As you know, it is a rough game. The more you can prevent things from happening, the flexibility, having all your muscles fluid and loose kind of like a rubber band, the best results you can get. ... There is a factor of luck. But there is also a factor of knowing when to take a risk on a certain play, knowing a situation in a game. Do you have to go in and take that big hit? Knowing when the journey is over on getting hit. Knowing not to cut back where the big men are. And there's also rest, recovery and hydration." Edelman played 16 games for the first time in his career last year, and caught 105 passes. He referred the injury-plagued Amendola to Guerrero, and the two worked together this offseason.


     


     


     


    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014" rel="nofollow">http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000376639/article/new-england-patriots-poised-for-defensive-renaissance-in-2014




    Or in your case, ever allowed to play a pickup game of any sport due to the clear hatred directed toward you that you have become used to your entire life.

     

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